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All 93 Oscar best picture winners (yes, all of them), ranked from worst to best

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Everybody has their own idea of what makes a best picture winner at the Oscars. Perhaps a biopic or a war movie, or something huge in scale such as a “Dances With Wolves” or “Titanic.”

What’s pretty clear if you undertake watching all 93 (so far) films to take that vaunted prize – and it’s not for the fainthearted, trust us – is that you come out of it changed. You love movies a little bit more. 

All of these films bear Hollywood’s highest honor – but how do they compare with one another? To celebrate Sunday’s 94th Academy Awards ceremony (ABC, 8 EDT/5 PDT), we’re ranking every best picture winner, from iffy stuff where a recount seems in order to the very best of the best.

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Thandie Newton and Matt Dillon cross paths for a second time in an emotional scene from "Crash."

93. ‘The Broadway Melody’ (1928/29)

The second best picture winner, it’s a musical dud with vaudevillian sisters and romantic malarkey that could have won worst picture, too.

92. ‘Crash’ (2005)

A mess of interwoven stories centered on social and xenophobic tensions in LA, it has a good cast (Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle) and little else.

91. ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ (1952)

Jimmy Stewart’s a clown and Charlton Heston also signs up for this ostentatious and loathsome three-ring ode to P.T. Barnum’s circus.

90. ‘Cimarron’ (1930/31)

The rocky drama about an 1800s Oklahoma family was the first Western to win the category, yet it has aged badly with unfortunate racist stereotypes.

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89. ‘Cavalcade’ (1932/33)

This sentimental tale of family, friends and servants experiencing ups and downs of life from 1899 to 1933 is like “Downton Abbey” but not good.

88. ‘Driving Miss Daisy’ (1989)

Morgan Freeman plays a Black driver and Jessica Tandy is his elderly white charge in an emotionally manipulative dramedy made for random cable TV showings.

87. ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ (1956)

An English dude (David Niven) travels the globe and meets colorful characters in a flighty three-hour affair. It’s no “Cannonball Run,” though.

86. ‘The English Patient’ (1996)

The pretentious World War II melodrama has Ralph Fiennes as a burned man, Juliette Binoche as his nurse and Kristin Scott Thomas as his already-married love.

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"Shakespeare in Love" imagines a romance between Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) and a woman (Gwyneth Paltrow) who inspires the Bard to write “Romeo and Juliet.”

85. ‘Out of Africa’ (1985)

Meryl Streep’s married Danish writer falls for Robert Redford’s big-game hunter over 160 snoozy minutes of Oscar-bait romance.

84. ‘Shakespeare in Love’ (1998)

The biopic rom-com gone wrong finds Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) wooing the woman (Gwyneth Paltrow) who helps him write “Romeo and Juliet.”

83. ‘The Great Ziegfeld’ (1936)

William Powell plays the infamous title Broadway producer in an arduous and showy musical that is, suffice it to say, less than great.

82. ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)

Hilary Swank packed on muscle to play an up-and-coming boxer trained by an aging coach (director Clint Eastwood) in a film as depressing as “Rocky” is uplifting.

81. ‘How Green Was My Valley’ (1941)

One of the Oscars’ greatest unsolved mysteries is how this maudlin Welsh family coal drama upset “Citizen Kane.”

‘Brave enough to be out in Hollywood’:What Ariana DeBose, Kristen Stewart’s Oscar nods mean

Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen, right) is driver, confidante and security for famous pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) on a 1962 concert tour of the South in "Green Book."

80. ‘Chariots of Fire’ (1981)

Vangelis’ catchy theme is the most memorable aspect of this emotionally deep but sluggish British sports drama that follows runners racing toward the 1924 Paris Olympics.

79. ‘Green Book’ (2018)

Mahershala Ali plays a Black pianist touring the Jim Crow South and Viggo Mortensen is his uncouth driver in a feel-good film about race relations with a whitewashed perspective.

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I'm among the rideshare drivers living in fear, demanding safer work conditions

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Uber, Lyft safety: I’m mom of three. I need to know I’ll make it home.

Uber, Lyft made safety improvements, but many of those protect riders more than drivers. But drivers are also in danger.

Naomi Ogutu is a member of Justice for App Workers.

Naomi Ogutu

Opinion contributor

I’ve been a rideshare driver in New York City for six years, and I take pride in my job and helping my passengers get where they need to go safely. But my safety is not a guarantee. I’m a mom of three. I need to know that I’ll make it home to my kids at the end of each night. 

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'A bad déjà vu': Under the crush of Western sanctions, Russians fear a return to dark economic days

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Russians fear toll of sanctions triggered by Putin’s Ukraine invasion

Harsh sanctions from Western nations on Russia have reminded citizens of the country’s 1998 debt crisis.

By Anna Nemtsova

USA TODAY

  • McDonalds and other American businesses have closed in Russia amid its invasion into Ukraine.
  • One expert estimates more than 200,000 Russians have left the country since the start of the war.
  • To counter economic turmoil, Putin has demand “unfriendly” countries pay for natural gas exports in rubles.

The once bustling corner of Moscow’s central Tverskaya Street looked deserted on Wednesday, as Russia’s first-ever McDonald’s franchise – opened in 1990 in a move that symbolized the Soviet Union’s opening to the West – shut its doors.

A large mural depicting a giant, Soviet-era medal – the Order of Victory, the highest military decoration awarded in World War II — loomed over over the empty sidewalk.

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Saint Peter's embodies wackiness and uncertainty of this NCAA Tournament | Opinion

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