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Biden in Brussels, SCOTUS hearings end, NCAA Sweet 16: 5 things to know Thursday

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Biden in Brussels for NATO summit on Ukraine

President Joe Biden will attend a special NATO summit in Brussels and a European Council meeting Thursday as leaders seek to reaffirm their unity amid Russia’s ongoing assault on Ukraine. NATO is expected to discuss enhancements of the military, humanitarian, and financial support they are giving Ukraine, officials said, while stiffening economic sanctions on President Vladimir Putin and Russia. Poland has proposed creation of a peacekeeping force in Ukraine, but officials said Sunday they do not know if NATO is willing to take such a provocative action. On Friday, Biden will meet with Polish President Andrzej Duda in Warsaw, Poland, to discuss the Western response to the humanitarian and human rights crisis from the war, according to the White House.

Legal experts to weigh in on final day of Ketanji Brown Jackson’s hearings

On Thursday, legal experts and interest groups will weigh in on Ketanji Brown Jackson as the Senate Judiciary Committee wraps up four days of hearings on her historic nomination to become the first Black woman on the Supreme Court. Interest groups including the American Bar Association and civil rights organizations will testify about Jackson’s suitability for the court. Witnesses chosen by Republican senators will also speak. The American Bar Association, which evaluates judicial nominees, already gave Jackson its highest rating, unanimously “well qualified,” last week. Brown Jackson defended her record during a third round of hearings Wednesday as Republicans coalesced around themes that she is soft on crime and vague about her approach to the Constitution. She went on to defend her sentencing practices and her views on expanding the Supreme Court. At one point, the judge said – if she’s confirmed – she will recuse herself in a case about the use of race in the admissions process at Harvard University.

Miami Beach instates curfew to curb spring break violence 

A temporary midnight curfew in the city of Miami Beach will go into effect Thursday after five people were wounded in two shootings over the weekend in the spring break destination. Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber declared a state of emergency Monday, saying in a news conference that tourists who came for a few days of uncontrolled fun have created an “unacceptable” environment in South Beach. The rule went into effect Thursday at 12:01 a.m. and it will remain until 6 a.m. on Monday, March 28. Miami Beach officials announced a similar curfew last year in an effort to curb excessive drinking and violence, which led to the arrest of more than 1,000 people. 

Men’s NCAA tournament resumes with Sweet 16

The NCAA men’s basketball tournament picks back up Thursday with the Sweet 16 and a pair of No. 1 seeds and two No. 2 seeds are among the eight teams in action.Gonzaga, the No. 1 overall seed, gets the evening’s slate of games started when the Bulldogs face off against No. 4 seed Arkansas (7:09 p.m. ET, CBS).Staying in the West Region, No. 2 seed Duke will look to extend Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching career the Blue Devils face No. 3 Texas Tech (9:39 p.m. ET, CBS). Both games will be played in San Francisco. In the South Region, No. 2 seed Villanova will look to end No. 11 seed Michigan’s surprise run in the tournament, as the two teams square off for the chance to advance (7:29 p.m. ET, TBS). And in the final game of the evening, Arizona, the top seed in the South Region, will take on No. 5 Houston (9:59 p.m. ET, TBS). Both of those games will be played in San Antonio, Texas. 

NYC to lift mandate, paving way for unvaccinated Nets, Yankees, Mets to play home games 

New York City mayor Eric Adams plans to lift the private-sector COVID-19 vaccine mandate for professional athletes Thursday, a person familiar with the situation told USA TODAY Sports. The Associated Press reports the mandate will be lifted for performers as well. This will pave the way for unvaccinated NBA star Kyrie Irving to play in home games for the Brooklyn Nets and for unvaccinated New York Yankees and Mets players to also play in home games when the MLB season begins next month. The city’s sweeping vaccine mandate for workers will still apply to people with other types of jobs, including government employees. Adams had said he felt the vaccine rule was unfair when it came to athletes and performers because a loophole in the measure, imposed under his predecessor, Bill de Blasio, allowed visiting players and performers who don’t work in New York to still play or perform even if they are unvaccinated. “We’re going to make the right decision,” Adams said Wednesday. 

Contributing: The Associated Press

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Ruud van Nistelrooy makes next job decision as Man Utd plan coaching appointment

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That decision failed to pay off, however, with the Red Devils sacking Moyes after just 10 months in charge.

After the current West Ham boss came Van Gaal, who arrived with big things expected due to his past success at the likes of Barcelona and Ajax.

Giggs was hoping to get the Red Devils job himself, which was why he stayed, but both ended up leaving nearly six years ago.

When Jose Mourinho took over, he opted to maintain his close relationship with Rui Faria – who had previously worked under him at clubs such as Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Fair departed in the summer of 2018, though, with Michael Carrick then given a place on Mourinho’s bench.

Carrick stayed to work under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, with the Norwegian also regularly picking up the thoughts of Phelan and Kieran McKenna throughout his spell in the dugout.

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High cholesterol: Blood pressure drug linked to significant reduction in good cholesterol

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“Though they’re commonly used to treat different forms of heart disease, beta-blockers can significantly reduce HDL levels.”

Among the beta-blockers that cause this are Corgard (nadolol), Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol), Zebeta (bisoprolol).

These drugs are widely used in the treatment of angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, heart attack and high blood pressure.

But despite concerns about their effect on cholesterol, scientists stress that the benefits of beta-blockers far outweigh the risks.

VeryWell Health adds: “If your beta-blocker affects your cholesterol significantly, your doctor may lower your dose or switch you to a different medication.”



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Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez not on same page over Saudi Arabia GP after missile attack

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However, after a four-hour meeting between race officials and the teams, it was confirmed the race would go ahead despite the attack. It had been reported that a number of the competing drivers were concerned for their safety following the nearby explosion.

Despite this, an agreement was finally reached to race at 2:30am local time, after team chiefs left the lengthy meeting to confirm: “We will be racing.” A statement from Formula 1 confirmed Sunday’s race would go ahead as planned. It read: “Formula 1 has been in close contact with the relevant authorities following the situation that took place today. The authorities have confirmed that the event can continue as planned and we will remain in close contact with them and all the teams and closely monitor the situation.”

Unsurprisingly, there were a number of mixed views on whether the race should go ahead, and this is clearly apparent in the Red Bull setup. This comes after advisor Helmut Marko revealed that drivers Verstappen and Perez are not on the same page when it comes to racing.

JUST IN: F1 drivers ‘had concerns’ about Saudi Arabia GP as new details emerge after missile attack

On the issue, Marko told Sky Germany: “Max is a bit more relaxed about it. Perez is a little bit scared, but when you live in Mexico City there’s not much more security. We have the pandemic, we have the war in Europe and now we have a missile attack 20 kilometres away. This is no longer normal or pleasant.”

Ahead of tomorrow’s race though, the Austrian advisor is firmly on the side of Verstappen and the race officials, supporting the idea of the race taking place. He commented: “I really think it’s the right thing to do. As I said, these drone attacks are common, I think. They have a very good defence system. Why this one didn’t work remains to be seen. It’s not the first drone, after all. But it’s the first one to strike on such a scale.”

The attack took place during Friday’s first practice session, and it was Red Bull’s star man Verstappen who was one of the first to realise something was wrong after reporting on his team radio that he could ‘smell burning’. Initially, the Dutchman thought the smell was coming from either his or one of his rival’s cars, however it then became clear that an explosion had taken place just a few miles from the track.

Giving an insight into Verstappen’s initial worries, Marko said: “Max radioed us, he thought his car had caught fire because there was an intense burning smell. We were informed a drone had been sent from Yemen. The Saudis have a defence system and for some reason the drone was not intercepted.”



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