Connect with us

Nation

Biden's Poland visit, Oklahoma service, NCAA's March Madness: 5 things to know Friday

Published

on

[ad_1]

Biden heads to Poland for meetings on Ukraine war’s humanitarian crisis

President Joe Biden will travel to Poland Friday for a briefing on the humanitarian crisis sparked by the month-old war in Ukraine and to possibly meet with Ukrainian refugees displaced by the conflict. More than 2 million Ukrainians have fled to Poland since the start of Russia’s invasion of their country. In Brussels on Thursday, Biden pledged $1 billion in U.S. humanitarian assistance to refugees fleeing the invasion and hinted that he may meet with some of them. In the Polish city of Rzeszów, Biden will receive a briefing on the response to the suffering of civilians inside Ukraine and the response to the flow of refugees fleeing the country. Afterward, he will meet with U.S. services members in the 82nd Airborne Division who have been deployed to Poland in recent weeks to help bolster NATO’s eastern flank. Biden will close the day by heading to Warsaw, where on Saturday he will meet with Polish President Andrzej Duda.

Memorial service scheduled for the 6 Oklahoma teens who died in car crash

A memorial service for the six Oklahoma teenagers killed Tuesday afternoon when the car they were riding in was hit by a large truck has been scheduled Friday night at the football stadium of the high school they all attended. The girls were students at Tishomingo High School and were on a lunch break at the time of the accident, according to district Superintendent Bobby Waitman. Those who died included the 16-year-old driver, three 15-year-olds and two 17-year-old passengers, the patrol said. Their names were not released because they are juveniles. The six girls were in a 2015 Chevrolet Spark that is designed to carry four passengers and only two of the six were wearing seat belts, according to a report by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol. The car also reportedly failed to come to a full stop before entering an intersection where it was hit by the truck that was hauling rocks, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday.

March Madness: NCAA’s Sweet 16 becomes the Elite Eight

By the time Friday is over, we’ll be down to the Elite Eight in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. The slate begins with the field’s last true Cinderella in action: Saint Peter’s of the MAAC has a chance to do what no other No. 15 seed has done and reach the regional final. But they will need to beat No. 3 Purdue, a former No. 1 team in the nation, which has a great chance to reach the Final Four for the first time since 1980 (7:09 p.m. ET, CBS). Also in the East Region, traditional college basketball stalwarts will face off when No. 4 seed UCLA takes on No. 8 North Carolina (9:39 p.m. ET, CBS). Both games will be played in Philadelphia.  In the Midwest Region in Chicago, No. 4 Providence meets the only No. 1 seed remaining in Kansas (7:29 p.m. ET, TBS). The last game of the night will see two surprising teams match up when No. 11 Iowa State faces No. 10 Miami (9:59 p.m. ET, TBS).    Head to our men’s and women’s college basketball pages for more on the Friday matchups.

Prince William, Duchess Kate to take part in several events in the Bahamas

Prince William and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, arrived in the Bahamas Thursday for the final leg of their weeklong trip to Central America and the Caribbean designed to strengthen Britain’s ties with Commonwealth nations as Queen Elizabeth II marks 70 years on the throne. The royal couple are scheduled to take part in several events and attend a dinner featuring community leaders Friday. William also will give a speech at the dinner. But protests have clouded the royal couple’s three-nation visit and that will continue Friday when a demonstration will be held by Rastafarian groups in the Bahamas demanding reparation payments by Great Britain and an apology from the monarchy for its role in the slave trade. Local opposition also forced the couple to cancel a visit to a cacao farm in Belize and the Jamaica trip angered some. William expressed his “profound sorrow” for slavery during a speech Wednesday in Jamaica, though he stopped short of offering the apology protesters demanded.

‘Bridgerton’ burns bright in Season 2 

Dear readers, Lady Whistledown returned to your Netflix queue Friday with the much anticipated Season 2. Netflix’s addictive romantic drama, set in 19th century Regency era England and produced by Shonda Rhimes, lit the streaming service on fire when it premiered on Christmas in 2020.. Mirroring Julia Quinn’s books, this sophomore outing focuses on eldest Bridgerton sibling Anthony (Jonathan Bailey) and his quest for a wife. “The main narrative arc of this season is this question of head versus heart, or duty versus love, and which one wins,” says creator Chris Van Dusen. In her ★★★ (out of four) review, TV critic Kelly Lawler says that thanks to Anthony’s “electric love interest, Lady Whistledown, drama and the continued excellence of the cast, ‘Bridgerton’ has a strong sophomore season that should keep its fans happy, even if they might wonder where all the sex scenes went.”  

Contributing: The Associated Press

[ad_2]

Nation

I'm among the rideshare drivers living in fear, demanding safer work conditions

Published

on

[ad_1]

Uber, Lyft safety: I’m mom of three. I need to know I’ll make it home.

Uber, Lyft made safety improvements, but many of those protect riders more than drivers. But drivers are also in danger.

Naomi Ogutu is a member of Justice for App Workers.

Naomi Ogutu

Opinion contributor

I’ve been a rideshare driver in New York City for six years, and I take pride in my job and helping my passengers get where they need to go safely. But my safety is not a guarantee. I’m a mom of three. I need to know that I’ll make it home to my kids at the end of each night. 

Subscribe to continue reading

Access all subscriber-only stories free for 2 months

Subscribe Now

Help Terms of Service Privacy Policy Your California Privacy Rights / Privacy Policy Our Ethical Principles Site Map

© 2022 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

[ad_2]

Continue Reading

Business

'A bad déjà vu': Under the crush of Western sanctions, Russians fear a return to dark economic days

Published

on

[ad_1]

Russians fear toll of sanctions triggered by Putin’s Ukraine invasion

Harsh sanctions from Western nations on Russia have reminded citizens of the country’s 1998 debt crisis.

By Anna Nemtsova

USA TODAY

  • McDonalds and other American businesses have closed in Russia amid its invasion into Ukraine.
  • One expert estimates more than 200,000 Russians have left the country since the start of the war.
  • To counter economic turmoil, Putin has demand “unfriendly” countries pay for natural gas exports in rubles.

The once bustling corner of Moscow’s central Tverskaya Street looked deserted on Wednesday, as Russia’s first-ever McDonald’s franchise – opened in 1990 in a move that symbolized the Soviet Union’s opening to the West – shut its doors.

A large mural depicting a giant, Soviet-era medal – the Order of Victory, the highest military decoration awarded in World War II — loomed over over the empty sidewalk.

Subscribe to continue reading

Access all subscriber-only stories free for 2 months

Subscribe Now

Help Terms of Service Privacy Policy Your California Privacy Rights / Privacy Policy Our Ethical Principles Site Map

© 2022 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

[ad_2]

Continue Reading

Nation

Saint Peter's embodies wackiness and uncertainty of this NCAA Tournament | Opinion

Published

on

[ad_1]



[ad_2]

Continue Reading

Trending