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Dementia is the 'most feared' health condition

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One in four admits being anxious talking about symptoms, a fifth will not see a GP for a diagnosis and one in five would not recognise symptoms.

The incurable brain-wasting disease affects 900,000 in the UK – enough to fill Wembley stadium 10 times over.

Kate Lee, the charity’s chief executive, said: “These statistics lay bare the fear and stigma that still surrounds dementia.”

She added: “It is crucial that we raise awareness about the symptoms of dementia and help to make people more confident in talking about it, so they seek the crucial diagnosis which unlocks all the advice and support they need.”

England play Switzerland on Saturday at Wembley, where the 1966 World Cup was lifted by Bobby Moore, who died in 1993 aged 51.

The Football Association and Alzheimer’s Society are promoting awareness of the disease after it hit the winning team – five developed Alzheimer’s and it has killed four.

Ray Wilson was first to succumb, in 2018. Martin Peters died a year later while Jack Charlton and Nobby Stiles both passed away in 2020 – Sir Bobby Charlton is battling the condition.

Writing exclusively for the Express, hat-trick hero Sir Geoff Hurst, 80, said: “It’s no surprise dementia is the most worrying condition for millions.

“It’s an awful condition that has impacted so many of the unforgettable team of 1966. Talk about dementia – it could make a real difference to someone’s life.”

Analysis of the poll of 2,000 adults shows people are more concerned about dementia than by heart disease and stroke.

Ex-Health Secretary Matt Hancock told this newspaper just days before the 2019 general election he would plough £1.6billion into research in the next decade – an extra £83million a year. That promise has not been kept.

Mr Hancock said the funds would be part of a “Dementia Moonshot” – the hunt for a cure. The boost was meant to see research in Britain receive around £166million a year, administered through the National Institute for Health Research.

Cash was promised for more clinical research academics and researchers in innovative techniques, such as neurotechnologies and advanced therapeutics. Researchers started to consider seriously a link between dementia and football after ex-West Bromwich Albion and England striker Jeff Astle died in 2002 at 59.

An inquest ruled he was killed by an “industrial disease” arising from heading – the first such verdict.

Current players are thought to be at greater risk of developing dementia as there is more heading of the ball and it travels faster. The FA has promised to ensure employees, players and fans get dedicated dementia help.

The charity in turn will provide the FA with research and expertise so it can better understand the causes.

Everton fan Tommy Dunne, 70, of Liverpool was diagnosed aged 58 in 2011. He said: “My wife encouraged me to join a social club for fans living with dementia and I loved it. I was around people who understood.”

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COMMENT BY SIR GEOFF HURST

It’s no surprise dementia is the most worrying condition for millions – it impacted so many of the unforgettable team of 1966.

Memories of that day are still so fresh in my mind – Wembley stadium, crowds cheering and the lap of honour, trophy thrust into the air. For so many fans affected by dementia, those nail-biting, edge of your seat moments can drift away. It’s why I support Alzheimer’s Society’s partnership with the FA.

I had the honour of sitting down with three England players to talk about this and heard about Ben Chilwell’s moving experiences with his grandfather.

Football is all about support – from team-mates, your country, the fans. We can harness this support to really bring dementia out of the shadows and help ensure no one faces it alone in the football community.

It’s brilliant Gareth Southgate and the squad are championing this important cause. I’m looking forward to attending England v Switzerland which has been dedicated an Alzheimer’s Society International on Saturday.

Season-ticket holder, past or present player, fan… we all need to do more. To create a society that understands people with dementia and makes sure everyone facing a diagnosis can get the support they need. Talk about dementia. It could make a real difference to someone’s life.

  • Sir Geoff Hurst – World Cup Hero



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Ruud van Nistelrooy makes next job decision as Man Utd plan coaching appointment

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That decision failed to pay off, however, with the Red Devils sacking Moyes after just 10 months in charge.

After the current West Ham boss came Van Gaal, who arrived with big things expected due to his past success at the likes of Barcelona and Ajax.

Giggs was hoping to get the Red Devils job himself, which was why he stayed, but both ended up leaving nearly six years ago.

When Jose Mourinho took over, he opted to maintain his close relationship with Rui Faria – who had previously worked under him at clubs such as Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Fair departed in the summer of 2018, though, with Michael Carrick then given a place on Mourinho’s bench.

Carrick stayed to work under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, with the Norwegian also regularly picking up the thoughts of Phelan and Kieran McKenna throughout his spell in the dugout.

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High cholesterol: Blood pressure drug linked to significant reduction in good cholesterol

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“Though they’re commonly used to treat different forms of heart disease, beta-blockers can significantly reduce HDL levels.”

Among the beta-blockers that cause this are Corgard (nadolol), Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol), Zebeta (bisoprolol).

These drugs are widely used in the treatment of angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, heart attack and high blood pressure.

But despite concerns about their effect on cholesterol, scientists stress that the benefits of beta-blockers far outweigh the risks.

VeryWell Health adds: “If your beta-blocker affects your cholesterol significantly, your doctor may lower your dose or switch you to a different medication.”



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Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez not on same page over Saudi Arabia GP after missile attack

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However, after a four-hour meeting between race officials and the teams, it was confirmed the race would go ahead despite the attack. It had been reported that a number of the competing drivers were concerned for their safety following the nearby explosion.

Despite this, an agreement was finally reached to race at 2:30am local time, after team chiefs left the lengthy meeting to confirm: “We will be racing.” A statement from Formula 1 confirmed Sunday’s race would go ahead as planned. It read: “Formula 1 has been in close contact with the relevant authorities following the situation that took place today. The authorities have confirmed that the event can continue as planned and we will remain in close contact with them and all the teams and closely monitor the situation.”

Unsurprisingly, there were a number of mixed views on whether the race should go ahead, and this is clearly apparent in the Red Bull setup. This comes after advisor Helmut Marko revealed that drivers Verstappen and Perez are not on the same page when it comes to racing.

JUST IN: F1 drivers ‘had concerns’ about Saudi Arabia GP as new details emerge after missile attack

On the issue, Marko told Sky Germany: “Max is a bit more relaxed about it. Perez is a little bit scared, but when you live in Mexico City there’s not much more security. We have the pandemic, we have the war in Europe and now we have a missile attack 20 kilometres away. This is no longer normal or pleasant.”

Ahead of tomorrow’s race though, the Austrian advisor is firmly on the side of Verstappen and the race officials, supporting the idea of the race taking place. He commented: “I really think it’s the right thing to do. As I said, these drone attacks are common, I think. They have a very good defence system. Why this one didn’t work remains to be seen. It’s not the first drone, after all. But it’s the first one to strike on such a scale.”

The attack took place during Friday’s first practice session, and it was Red Bull’s star man Verstappen who was one of the first to realise something was wrong after reporting on his team radio that he could ‘smell burning’. Initially, the Dutchman thought the smell was coming from either his or one of his rival’s cars, however it then became clear that an explosion had taken place just a few miles from the track.

Giving an insight into Verstappen’s initial worries, Marko said: “Max radioed us, he thought his car had caught fire because there was an intense burning smell. We were informed a drone had been sent from Yemen. The Saudis have a defence system and for some reason the drone was not intercepted.”



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