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Denise Van Outen health: Star on her 'difficult' eczema – 'It flares up quite badly'

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The star, who is appearing on today’s episode of James Martin’s Saturday Morning recently took to her social media channels to share an insight into her battle with eczema, and how the condition has been “difficult” to manage. The National Eczema Association explains that eczema is an inflammatory skin condition that causes dry, itchy skin as well as rashes, scaly patches, blisters and skin infections. There are in fact seven different types of eczema to be aware of including: atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, nummular eczema, seborrheic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis.

Speaking about her own personal experience with the condition, Outen shared this with her 645,000 Instagram followers: “I have had eczema for as long as I can remember.

“I used to think it was because of the food I was eating but I realised that my eczema appears mostly when it’s cold.

“It flares up quite badly on my arms, I’ll get dry patches and my skin will occasionally crack if I don’t get it under control.

“It’s difficult when you have a flare-up and I admit my eczema has made me feel self-conscious.”

READ MORE: Susanna Reid health: ‘There is no cure’ – presenter on her battle with ‘bad’ condition

The star went on to say that the condition became so bad at some point that it affected her career.

She said: “Even times when I was performing at my cabaret show I had to amend my costume to have long sleeves to cover it up.”

Eczema can develop at any time during an individual’s life, from childhood to adulthood and can either be mild or severe.

Many people with eczema use the phrase “flare-up” to describe a phase of eczema when they are experiencing one or more acute symptoms.

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The NHS explains that symptoms of atopic eczema – the most common type of eczema – can include more than itchy, dry and cracked skin.

For some individuals, their skin will become inflamed, meaning skin will either turn red or grey depending on their skin tone.

This most often affects the hands, insides of the elbows, the backs of the knees and the face and scalp.

Many factors can contribute to the development of the skin condition, including an interaction between your environment and your genes.

The National Eczema Association adds: “When an irritant or an allergen from outside or inside the body ‘switches on’ the immune system, it produces inflammation, or a flare-up, on the surface of the skin.

“This inflammation causes the symptoms common to most types of eczema.

“There is also a potential genetic component to eczema that includes a protein called ‘filaggrin’ that helps maintain moisture in your skin; a filaggrin deficiency can lead to drier, itchier skin.”

In some cases household items can also be a potential irritant and can cause not only an eczema flare-up but also an allergic reaction. Common eczema triggers include:

  • Extended exposure to dry air, extreme heat or cold
  • Some types of soap, shampoo, bubble bath, body wash, facial cleansers
  • Laundry detergents and fabric softeners with chemical additives
  • Certain fabrics like wool or polyester in clothing and sheets
  • Surface cleaners and disinfectants
  • Natural liquids like the juice from fruit, vegetables and meats
  • Fragrances in candles
  • Metals, especially nickel, in jewellery or utensils
  • Formaldehyde, which is found in household disinfectants, some vaccines, glues and adhesives
  • Isothiazolinone, an antibacterial found in personal care products like baby wipes
  • Cocamidopropyl betaine, which is used to thicken shampoos and lotions
  • Paraphenylene-diamine, which is used in leather dyes and temporary tattoos.

Although there is no cure for eczema, there are effective treatments available, which Outen has found herself. In an Instagram post she added: “I’m delighted to be partnered with @doublebaseuk, who’s research has revealed three-quarters (74 percent) of eczema sufferers felt self-conscious about their eczema and 92 percent of eczema sufferers said the stress caused by their eczema, made the condition worse.

“I have been using the Dry Skin Emollient from @doublebaseuk for the last month or so and I can honestly say the difference in my skin has been incredible.”

Typical treatments for eczema depend on how bad the condition is. The NHS recommends the following for helping to control symptoms:

  • Self-care techniques, such as reducing scratching and avoiding triggers
  • Emollients (moisturising treatments) – used on a daily basis for dry skin
  • Topical corticosteroids – used to reduce swelling, redness and itching during flare-ups.

Many people with eczema also find success with specific natural and alternative treatments, including cryotherapy, medical-grade honey, meditation and acupuncture.



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Ruud van Nistelrooy makes next job decision as Man Utd plan coaching appointment

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That decision failed to pay off, however, with the Red Devils sacking Moyes after just 10 months in charge.

After the current West Ham boss came Van Gaal, who arrived with big things expected due to his past success at the likes of Barcelona and Ajax.

Giggs was hoping to get the Red Devils job himself, which was why he stayed, but both ended up leaving nearly six years ago.

When Jose Mourinho took over, he opted to maintain his close relationship with Rui Faria – who had previously worked under him at clubs such as Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Fair departed in the summer of 2018, though, with Michael Carrick then given a place on Mourinho’s bench.

Carrick stayed to work under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, with the Norwegian also regularly picking up the thoughts of Phelan and Kieran McKenna throughout his spell in the dugout.

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High cholesterol: Blood pressure drug linked to significant reduction in good cholesterol

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“Though they’re commonly used to treat different forms of heart disease, beta-blockers can significantly reduce HDL levels.”

Among the beta-blockers that cause this are Corgard (nadolol), Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol), Zebeta (bisoprolol).

These drugs are widely used in the treatment of angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, heart attack and high blood pressure.

But despite concerns about their effect on cholesterol, scientists stress that the benefits of beta-blockers far outweigh the risks.

VeryWell Health adds: “If your beta-blocker affects your cholesterol significantly, your doctor may lower your dose or switch you to a different medication.”



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Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez not on same page over Saudi Arabia GP after missile attack

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However, after a four-hour meeting between race officials and the teams, it was confirmed the race would go ahead despite the attack. It had been reported that a number of the competing drivers were concerned for their safety following the nearby explosion.

Despite this, an agreement was finally reached to race at 2:30am local time, after team chiefs left the lengthy meeting to confirm: “We will be racing.” A statement from Formula 1 confirmed Sunday’s race would go ahead as planned. It read: “Formula 1 has been in close contact with the relevant authorities following the situation that took place today. The authorities have confirmed that the event can continue as planned and we will remain in close contact with them and all the teams and closely monitor the situation.”

Unsurprisingly, there were a number of mixed views on whether the race should go ahead, and this is clearly apparent in the Red Bull setup. This comes after advisor Helmut Marko revealed that drivers Verstappen and Perez are not on the same page when it comes to racing.

JUST IN: F1 drivers ‘had concerns’ about Saudi Arabia GP as new details emerge after missile attack

On the issue, Marko told Sky Germany: “Max is a bit more relaxed about it. Perez is a little bit scared, but when you live in Mexico City there’s not much more security. We have the pandemic, we have the war in Europe and now we have a missile attack 20 kilometres away. This is no longer normal or pleasant.”

Ahead of tomorrow’s race though, the Austrian advisor is firmly on the side of Verstappen and the race officials, supporting the idea of the race taking place. He commented: “I really think it’s the right thing to do. As I said, these drone attacks are common, I think. They have a very good defence system. Why this one didn’t work remains to be seen. It’s not the first drone, after all. But it’s the first one to strike on such a scale.”

The attack took place during Friday’s first practice session, and it was Red Bull’s star man Verstappen who was one of the first to realise something was wrong after reporting on his team radio that he could ‘smell burning’. Initially, the Dutchman thought the smell was coming from either his or one of his rival’s cars, however it then became clear that an explosion had taken place just a few miles from the track.

Giving an insight into Verstappen’s initial worries, Marko said: “Max radioed us, he thought his car had caught fire because there was an intense burning smell. We were informed a drone had been sent from Yemen. The Saudis have a defence system and for some reason the drone was not intercepted.”



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