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Ketanji Brown Jackson hearings: Tillis takes stand against expanding Supreme Court

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  • Senate Judiciary Chairman Dick Durbin says Tuesday’s questions had Republicans playing politics.
  • Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, pushes back on Durbin’s fact-checking of GOP comments.
  • Sen. Chuck Grassley says Democrats withheld information on Jackson’s sentencing.
  • Sen. Jon Ossoff asked about Jackson’s ruling saying ‘presidents are not kings.’

WASHINGTON – Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson faces another day of questions from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, as hearings continue over her historic nomination to be the first Black woman on the Supreme Court. 

Senators asked the judge about a wide range of topics Tuesday, including about her judicial philosophy, her faith, her work as a former federal public defender and sentences she handed down as a District Court judge in Washington. 

Many of the same themes are likely to emerge again Wednesday as the same 22 members of the committee get a second – slightly shorter – round of questions. Democrats are planning to finish the hearings on Thursday and hope to move Jackson to a final confirmation vote by early April. 

Jackson’s first day:Jackson fights back against GOP criticism over sentencing, Gitmo 

Supreme Court Associate Justice nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during her confirmation hearing on March 23, 2022 in Washington. Judge Jackson was nominated by President Joe Biden to replace Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, who plans to retire at the end of the term. If confirmed, Judge Jackson will be the first Black woman to sit on the United States Supreme Court.

Tillis rails against court packing

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., started his line of questioning by asking Jackson to describe the different sides of the debate over adding justices to the Supreme Court.

He then pivoted to discuss the “ecosystem” of groups supporting Jackson’s nomination, including Demand Justice, a left-leaning activist group that has called for adding at least four justices to the high court and eliminating the Senate’s 60-vote filibuster.

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Razzies royally torch 'Diana' musical and 'Space Jam 2,' show love to Oscar favorite Will Smith

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As more marijuana dispensaries get targeted by robbers, SAFE Banking Act lingers in Congress

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Weed dispensaries targeted by robbers: Will SAFE Banking Act help?

A bill that could allow electronic transactions at weed dispensaries nationwide is again make its way through Congress but the SAFE Banking Act might not be the cure-all that supporters envision.

In over a decade of operating cannabis shops in Washington, Shea Hynes never once worried about his stores getting robbed at gun point – until recently: In a span of three weeks, his stores were robbed three different times at gun point.

Reports of armed robberies at cannabis dispensaries like Hynes’ have nearly doubled in the first quarter of this year compared with all of last year, according to data maintained by the Craft Cannabis Coalition. The group, which represents more than 50 stores in Washington, has recorded more than 65 armed robberies so far this year, compared with 35 in 2021 and 29 in 2020. 

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Takeaways from Friday's Sweet 16: North Carolina looks like national title contender

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