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Live updates: Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation hearings begin

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WASHINGTON – Less than a month after President Joe Biden introduced her as his Supreme Court nominee, Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson took her seat in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday for the first in what will be a whirlwind week of hearings.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Dick Durbin quickly noted the historic nature of Jackson’s nomination. She would be the first Black woman confirmed to the Supreme Court in its 233-year history.

“You, Judge Jackson, can be the first,” Durbin said, noting that being first isn’t always easy. “Today is a proud day for America.”

Hearings will last through Thursday, with introductions on Monday, and committee questioning taking up the following two days.

If confirmed, Jackson would be the 116th justice on the nation’s highest court. While Jackson’s confirmation wouldn’t change the ideological makeup of the court, her background as a former federal public defender and a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission may have a big influence.

But first, Jackson, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, has to navigate the kind of politics jurists generally like to avoid. Monday’s hearing will be all talk and no questions, with senators – and Jackson herself – offering carefully scripted opening statements that may offer some clues about how the next few days will go. 

Supreme Court Associate Justice nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during her confirmation hearing on March 21, 2022, in Washington. Jackson was nominated by President Joe Biden to replace Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, who plans to retire at the end of the term. If confirmed, she will be the first Black woman to sit on the United States Supreme Court.

Hearing preview:What to watch for in Ketanji Brown Jackson’s hearing

Grassley: Jackson hearing will be more respectful than Kavanaugh

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, used his opening statement to set the GOP tone for how they plan to interrogate Jackson’s legal thinking and decision making.

The ranking Republican noted how this week’s hearings will be an “exhaustive examination” Jackson’s record and views, but will be much different than the raucous tone of the hearings that confirmed Justice Brett Kavanaugh in 2018.



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As more marijuana dispensaries get targeted by robbers, SAFE Banking Act lingers in Congress

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Weed dispensaries targeted by robbers: Will SAFE Banking Act help?

A bill that could allow electronic transactions at weed dispensaries nationwide is again make its way through Congress but the SAFE Banking Act might not be the cure-all that supporters envision.

In over a decade of operating cannabis shops in Washington, Shea Hynes never once worried about his stores getting robbed at gun point – until recently: In a span of three weeks, his stores were robbed three different times at gun point.

Reports of armed robberies at cannabis dispensaries like Hynes’ have nearly doubled in the first quarter of this year compared with all of last year, according to data maintained by the Craft Cannabis Coalition. The group, which represents more than 50 stores in Washington, has recorded more than 65 armed robberies so far this year, compared with 35 in 2021 and 29 in 2020. 

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