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New Hampshire students launched a boat in 2020. It was found last month 8,000 miles away in Norway

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Karel Nuncic, a sixth-grade student in Norway, seen with the recovered Rye Riptides miniature boat which was set to sea in October 2020.
  • Students send off mini-boat filled with gifts in 2020
  • Mini-boat GPS tracker goes offline
  • A sixth-grader finds the damaged boat off of a small island in Norway

RYE, New Hampshire — After a group of New Hampshire students built a roughly six-foot-long miniature boat and filled it with gifts in late 2020, they set it out in the Atlantic Ocean, hoping it would eventually wash ashore and be opened by someone across the globe.

While some students at Rye Junior High School wished for it to drift to Europe, then-sixth grader Solstice Reed wasn’t as convinced the voyage would be successful. “Honestly, I thought it would sink,” she admitted. 

Fortunately, to her and her peers’ pleasant surprise, Reed’s initial skepticism turned out to be unfounded.

The Rye Riptides boat, equipped with a tracking device, spent 462 days at sea and registered its coordinates at different points throughout its journey. And this month, at long last, a curious sixth-grader in Smøla, a small island near Dyrnes, Norway, found the semi-dismantled boat, later bringing it to his school and opening it with his own delighted classmates. 

Retired Rye Junior High School teacher Sheila Adams, left, students Caitlin Tabit, Solstice Reed, Molly Flynn, Keira Hagen and Jack Facella and Educational Passages Executive Director Cassie Stymiest show off the map they used to track their miniature boat.

The cross-continent trek for Rye Riptides, which students and now-retired Rye Junior High School science teacher Sheila Adams stuffed with photos of the Rye students, a facemask with their signatures on it, fall leaves, acorns and state quarters, was conducted with the help of Educational Passages. The Maine-based nonprofit’s goal is to teach students about the ocean and its global impacts. It first began working with Adams on the project in 2018.

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Razzies royally torch 'Diana' musical and 'Space Jam 2,' show love to Oscar favorite Will Smith

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As more marijuana dispensaries get targeted by robbers, SAFE Banking Act lingers in Congress

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Weed dispensaries targeted by robbers: Will SAFE Banking Act help?

A bill that could allow electronic transactions at weed dispensaries nationwide is again make its way through Congress but the SAFE Banking Act might not be the cure-all that supporters envision.

In over a decade of operating cannabis shops in Washington, Shea Hynes never once worried about his stores getting robbed at gun point – until recently: In a span of three weeks, his stores were robbed three different times at gun point.

Reports of armed robberies at cannabis dispensaries like Hynes’ have nearly doubled in the first quarter of this year compared with all of last year, according to data maintained by the Craft Cannabis Coalition. The group, which represents more than 50 stores in Washington, has recorded more than 65 armed robberies so far this year, compared with 35 in 2021 and 29 in 2020. 

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Takeaways from Friday's Sweet 16: North Carolina looks like national title contender

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