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Pfizer vaccine: Musculoskeletal tissue and nervous system disorders reported in document

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The severe acute respiratory syndrome, COVID-19 has spread globally. Vaccines play an essential role in preventing the spread. But like all medications and vaccines, adverse events may occur.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said: “Among all study vaccine recipients asked to complete diaries of their symptoms during the seven days after vaccination, 84.7 percent reported at least one local injection site reaction.

“By age group, 88.7 percent in the younger group (aged 18 to 55 years) and 79.7 percent in the older group (aged >55 years) reported at least one local reaction.”

Pain at the injection site was the most frequent and severe solicited local reaction among vaccine recipients.

According to the Pfizer documents recently released, the System Organ Classes (SOCs) that contained the greatest number of events, in the overall dataset, were general disorders and administration site conditions with 51,335 adverse events.

READ MORE: High blood pressure warning: Two drugs recalled

Nervous system disorders, however, had 25,957 adverse events and musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders had 17,283 events.

About adverse events of special interest for musculoskeletal symptoms the documents stated: “Number of cases: 3600 (8.5 percent of the total PM dataset), of which 2045 medically confirmed and 1555 non-medically confirmed.

“Country of incidence: UK (1406), US (1004), Italy (285), Mexico (236), Germany (72), Portugal (70), France (48), Greece and Poland (46), Latvia (33), Czech Republic (32), Israel and Spain (26), Sweden (25), Romania (24), Denmark (23), Finland and Ireland (19 each), Austria and Belgium (18 each), Canada (16), Netherlands (14), Bulgaria (12), Croatia and Serbia (9 each), Cyprus and Hungary (8 each), Norway (7), Estonia and Puerto Rico (6 each), Iceland and Lithuania (4 each); the remaining 21 cases originated from 11 different countries.

“Number of relevant events: 3640, of which 1614 serious, 2026 non-serious.

“Reported relevant PTs: Arthralgia (3525), Arthritis (70), Rheumatoid arthritis (26), Polyarthritis (five), Polyneuropathy, Post viral fatigue syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome (four each), Arthritis bacterial (one).”

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For Neurological adverse events of special interest, the data revealed: “Number of cases: 501 (1.2 percent of the total PM dataset), of which 365 medically confirmed and 136 non-medically confirmed.

“Country of incidence UK (157), US (68), Germany (49), Mexico (35), Italy (31), France (25), Spain (18), Poland (17), Netherlands and Israel (15 each), Sweden (9). The remaining 71 cases were from 22 different countries.

“Most frequently reported relevant PTs (˃2 occurrences) included: Seizure (204), Epilepsy (83), Generalised tonic-clonic seizure (33), Guillain-Barre syndrome (24), Fibromyalgia and Trigeminal neuralgia (17 each), Febrile convulsion, (15), Status epilepticus (12), Aura and Myelitis transverse (11 each), Multiple sclerosis relapse and Optic neuritis (10 each), Petit mal epilepsy and Tonic convulsion (nine each), Ataxia (eight), Encephalopathy and Tonic clonic movements (seven each), Foaming at mouth (5), Multiple sclerosis, Narcolepsy and Partial seizures (four each).”

According to John Hopkins Medicine, disorders of the nervous system may involve the following vascular disorders, such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), subarachnoid haemorrhage, subdural haemorrhage and hematoma, and extradural haemorrhage.

Structural disorders include brain or spinal cord injury, Bell’s palsy, cervical spondylosis, carpal tunnel syndrome, brain or spinal cord tumours, peripheral neuropathy, and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Musculoskeletal disorders comprise diseases of the muscles, joints and bones, autoimmune disorders, and non-autoimmune disorders.

Connective tissue diseases include autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and lupus.

A specific safety assessment process is now often required to detect and monitor particular types of risks.

This includes the definition of Adverse Events of Special Interest (AESI) that are assessed, followed closely and reported together with the serious adverse events (SAE) by drug safety.

“The COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the UK have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness,” said the NHS.

“They can cause some side effects, but not everyone gets them.”



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Ruud van Nistelrooy makes next job decision as Man Utd plan coaching appointment

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That decision failed to pay off, however, with the Red Devils sacking Moyes after just 10 months in charge.

After the current West Ham boss came Van Gaal, who arrived with big things expected due to his past success at the likes of Barcelona and Ajax.

Giggs was hoping to get the Red Devils job himself, which was why he stayed, but both ended up leaving nearly six years ago.

When Jose Mourinho took over, he opted to maintain his close relationship with Rui Faria – who had previously worked under him at clubs such as Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Fair departed in the summer of 2018, though, with Michael Carrick then given a place on Mourinho’s bench.

Carrick stayed to work under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, with the Norwegian also regularly picking up the thoughts of Phelan and Kieran McKenna throughout his spell in the dugout.

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High cholesterol: Blood pressure drug linked to significant reduction in good cholesterol

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“Though they’re commonly used to treat different forms of heart disease, beta-blockers can significantly reduce HDL levels.”

Among the beta-blockers that cause this are Corgard (nadolol), Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol), Zebeta (bisoprolol).

These drugs are widely used in the treatment of angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, heart attack and high blood pressure.

But despite concerns about their effect on cholesterol, scientists stress that the benefits of beta-blockers far outweigh the risks.

VeryWell Health adds: “If your beta-blocker affects your cholesterol significantly, your doctor may lower your dose or switch you to a different medication.”



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Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez not on same page over Saudi Arabia GP after missile attack

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However, after a four-hour meeting between race officials and the teams, it was confirmed the race would go ahead despite the attack. It had been reported that a number of the competing drivers were concerned for their safety following the nearby explosion.

Despite this, an agreement was finally reached to race at 2:30am local time, after team chiefs left the lengthy meeting to confirm: “We will be racing.” A statement from Formula 1 confirmed Sunday’s race would go ahead as planned. It read: “Formula 1 has been in close contact with the relevant authorities following the situation that took place today. The authorities have confirmed that the event can continue as planned and we will remain in close contact with them and all the teams and closely monitor the situation.”

Unsurprisingly, there were a number of mixed views on whether the race should go ahead, and this is clearly apparent in the Red Bull setup. This comes after advisor Helmut Marko revealed that drivers Verstappen and Perez are not on the same page when it comes to racing.

JUST IN: F1 drivers ‘had concerns’ about Saudi Arabia GP as new details emerge after missile attack

On the issue, Marko told Sky Germany: “Max is a bit more relaxed about it. Perez is a little bit scared, but when you live in Mexico City there’s not much more security. We have the pandemic, we have the war in Europe and now we have a missile attack 20 kilometres away. This is no longer normal or pleasant.”

Ahead of tomorrow’s race though, the Austrian advisor is firmly on the side of Verstappen and the race officials, supporting the idea of the race taking place. He commented: “I really think it’s the right thing to do. As I said, these drone attacks are common, I think. They have a very good defence system. Why this one didn’t work remains to be seen. It’s not the first drone, after all. But it’s the first one to strike on such a scale.”

The attack took place during Friday’s first practice session, and it was Red Bull’s star man Verstappen who was one of the first to realise something was wrong after reporting on his team radio that he could ‘smell burning’. Initially, the Dutchman thought the smell was coming from either his or one of his rival’s cars, however it then became clear that an explosion had taken place just a few miles from the track.

Giving an insight into Verstappen’s initial worries, Marko said: “Max radioed us, he thought his car had caught fire because there was an intense burning smell. We were informed a drone had been sent from Yemen. The Saudis have a defence system and for some reason the drone was not intercepted.”



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