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Sandy Hook families, Remington reached a 'historic' settlement. What's next for similar cases?

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Sandy Hook-Remington settlement: Will case prompt future gun lawsuits?

  • The civil court case in Connecticut centered on Remington’s marketing of the gun used in the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
  • The lawsuit tested the scope of the 2005 Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, which grants gun manufacturers immunity from lawsuits related to crimes committed with their products.
  • What’s next? “Cases like this can have a general effect on the way in which people think about gun violence,” one expert told USA TODAY.

After the announcement of a $73 million settlement Tuesday, families of nine Sandy Hook shooting victims said they were finally able to hold a gunmaker to account for a deadly mass shooting.

But experts say it’s unclear how far-reaching of an effect the outcome will have on similar cases seeking to hold gun manufacturers accountable. After years of back-and-forth, the settlement was reached with Remington Arms, the maker of the Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle used to kill 20 first graders and six teachers in 2012 at the Newtown, Connecticut, elementary school.

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Razzies royally torch 'Diana' musical and 'Space Jam 2,' show love to Oscar favorite Will Smith

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As more marijuana dispensaries get targeted by robbers, SAFE Banking Act lingers in Congress

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Weed dispensaries targeted by robbers: Will SAFE Banking Act help?

A bill that could allow electronic transactions at weed dispensaries nationwide is again make its way through Congress but the SAFE Banking Act might not be the cure-all that supporters envision.

In over a decade of operating cannabis shops in Washington, Shea Hynes never once worried about his stores getting robbed at gun point – until recently: In a span of three weeks, his stores were robbed three different times at gun point.

Reports of armed robberies at cannabis dispensaries like Hynes’ have nearly doubled in the first quarter of this year compared with all of last year, according to data maintained by the Craft Cannabis Coalition. The group, which represents more than 50 stores in Washington, has recorded more than 65 armed robberies so far this year, compared with 35 in 2021 and 29 in 2020. 

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Takeaways from Friday's Sweet 16: North Carolina looks like national title contender

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