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Susanna Reid health: 'There is no cure' – presenter on her battle with 'bad' condition

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In the new ITV documentary, Reid interviews Carty, who was found guilty of the murder of a young mum whose baby she was allegedly planning to steal. Having served 20 years on death row already, Reid takes on the challenge of looking into the details of the trial to try and unveil some cracks in the case. The star began her broadcasting career back at the BBC, but it was in 2015 that she revealed she had been battling tinnitus – the perception of noises in the head and ear which have no external source – which has no cure.

The star began to suffer from the condition back in 2004 after the birth of her second son Finn, and throughout her career has revealed some of the irritating symptoms she constantly hears.

Back in 2013, when asked in an interview what “treasured item” she would wish to have again, Reid replied: “Silence. I’ve had tinnitus since Finn’s birth, which probably resulted from a difficult labour.

“When I first started hearing it, which was probably about ten years ago, I became quite distressed that I would never hear silence again.”

In another instance, the star took to social media to explain to her 861,000 followers that her condition was flaring up.

READ MORE: High blood pressure warning: Drug recalled as it may cause ‘adverse health consequences’

In one tweet back in 2018, Reid said: “My tinnitus is so loud right now.

“The noise you used to hear when TV programming finished at the end of the day? That. In my head.”

The British Tinnitus Association explains that an individual may hear a ringing, buzzing, hissing, whistling or other noise in either one or both of their ears which can become extremely irritating, especially as it may vary in volume.

According to The Mayo Clinic, around 15 to 20 percent of people suffer from the condition – particularly older adults.

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Occasionally people have tinnitus that can seem like a familiar tune or song. This is known as musical tinnitus or musical hallucination.

In other cases, some people have tinnitus which has a beat in time with their heartbeat. This is called pulsatile tinnitus.

As tinnitus is a symptom generated within the auditory system, it is usually caused by an underlying health condition such as:

  • Hearing loss
  • Ear infection
  • Head or neck injuries
  • Medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs.

Less common causes of tinnitus can include conditions such as diabetes, thyroid problems, migraines, arthritis and lupus.

The British Tinnitus Association states that “there is no cure for tinnitus,” but as Reid said herself, most people can deal with the condition on an everyday basis.

In a follow-up tweet in 2018, Reid said: “Yesterday was a bad tinnitus day, but I can deal with it mostly.

“If anyone out there needs support please contact @BritishTinnitus who have lots of good advice.”

For those who suffer badly with the condition, possible complications of the condition can include:

  • Fatigue
  • Stress
  • Sleep problems
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Memory problems
  • Depression
  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Headaches
  • Problems with work and family life.

In order to try and help cope with tinnitus, the NHS provides some key tips on what to do, these include the following:

  • Try to relax – deep breathing or yoga may help
  • Try to find ways to improve your sleep, such as sticking to a bedtime routine or cutting down on caffeine
  • Try to avoid things that can make tinnitus worse, such as stress or loud background noises
  • Try self-help books or self-help techniques to help you cope better
  • Join a support group – talking to other people with tinnitus may help you cope.

For some individuals who may need further support, the British Tinnitus Association recommends cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as either standalone or combined with sound therapy.

CBT can help individuals to manage the effect that tinnitus has on their life by offering techniques that can help deal with anxiety and distress. It helps individuals to understand their thought process in relation to the condition so that their thoughts can become more positive.

Exercising and gaining a higher level of wellbeing can also help people to ignore and cope with tinnitus more easily. For individuals who are not used to exercising, the Association says to begin gently with a brisk walk or a swim. Trying a range of exercising to improve strength, cardiovascular fitness, suppleness and flexibility also has been successful in the past.



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Ruud van Nistelrooy makes next job decision as Man Utd plan coaching appointment

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That decision failed to pay off, however, with the Red Devils sacking Moyes after just 10 months in charge.

After the current West Ham boss came Van Gaal, who arrived with big things expected due to his past success at the likes of Barcelona and Ajax.

Giggs was hoping to get the Red Devils job himself, which was why he stayed, but both ended up leaving nearly six years ago.

When Jose Mourinho took over, he opted to maintain his close relationship with Rui Faria – who had previously worked under him at clubs such as Real Madrid and Chelsea.

Fair departed in the summer of 2018, though, with Michael Carrick then given a place on Mourinho’s bench.

Carrick stayed to work under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, with the Norwegian also regularly picking up the thoughts of Phelan and Kieran McKenna throughout his spell in the dugout.

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High cholesterol: Blood pressure drug linked to significant reduction in good cholesterol

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“Though they’re commonly used to treat different forms of heart disease, beta-blockers can significantly reduce HDL levels.”

Among the beta-blockers that cause this are Corgard (nadolol), Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol), Zebeta (bisoprolol).

These drugs are widely used in the treatment of angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, heart attack and high blood pressure.

But despite concerns about their effect on cholesterol, scientists stress that the benefits of beta-blockers far outweigh the risks.

VeryWell Health adds: “If your beta-blocker affects your cholesterol significantly, your doctor may lower your dose or switch you to a different medication.”



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Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez not on same page over Saudi Arabia GP after missile attack

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However, after a four-hour meeting between race officials and the teams, it was confirmed the race would go ahead despite the attack. It had been reported that a number of the competing drivers were concerned for their safety following the nearby explosion.

Despite this, an agreement was finally reached to race at 2:30am local time, after team chiefs left the lengthy meeting to confirm: “We will be racing.” A statement from Formula 1 confirmed Sunday’s race would go ahead as planned. It read: “Formula 1 has been in close contact with the relevant authorities following the situation that took place today. The authorities have confirmed that the event can continue as planned and we will remain in close contact with them and all the teams and closely monitor the situation.”

Unsurprisingly, there were a number of mixed views on whether the race should go ahead, and this is clearly apparent in the Red Bull setup. This comes after advisor Helmut Marko revealed that drivers Verstappen and Perez are not on the same page when it comes to racing.

JUST IN: F1 drivers ‘had concerns’ about Saudi Arabia GP as new details emerge after missile attack

On the issue, Marko told Sky Germany: “Max is a bit more relaxed about it. Perez is a little bit scared, but when you live in Mexico City there’s not much more security. We have the pandemic, we have the war in Europe and now we have a missile attack 20 kilometres away. This is no longer normal or pleasant.”

Ahead of tomorrow’s race though, the Austrian advisor is firmly on the side of Verstappen and the race officials, supporting the idea of the race taking place. He commented: “I really think it’s the right thing to do. As I said, these drone attacks are common, I think. They have a very good defence system. Why this one didn’t work remains to be seen. It’s not the first drone, after all. But it’s the first one to strike on such a scale.”

The attack took place during Friday’s first practice session, and it was Red Bull’s star man Verstappen who was one of the first to realise something was wrong after reporting on his team radio that he could ‘smell burning’. Initially, the Dutchman thought the smell was coming from either his or one of his rival’s cars, however it then became clear that an explosion had taken place just a few miles from the track.

Giving an insight into Verstappen’s initial worries, Marko said: “Max radioed us, he thought his car had caught fire because there was an intense burning smell. We were informed a drone had been sent from Yemen. The Saudis have a defence system and for some reason the drone was not intercepted.”



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