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All is NOT calm! Animal lovers reveal the reality of spending Christmas with their four-legged friends, from cats getting tangled in the tree to a dog ripping presents to shreds

  • US animal lovers have shared what Christmas is really like when you have a pet 
  • From cats savaging the Christmas tree to dogs ripping presents to shreds 
  • In one snap, a poor feline was caught tangled in the tree’s sparkly garlands 










Pets can help to make Christmas a magical time… when they are not wreaking havoc on their owners’ houses.

Frazzled owners from around the world have revealed what it’s like to spend the holidays with very active pets who don’ really care about keeping the tree or the neatly wrapped presents intact until Christmas Day.

In one snap shared with the trivia website Bored Panda, a black cat was pictured strutting away from a tree after taking it down.

In another, a sheepish dog faces the camera after ripping their owner’s presents in shreds all over the living-room.

Animal lovers also regaled us with pictures of their geckos, rabbits, hamsters and even Alpaca in Santa hats and festive costumes.

People have shared hilarious pictures of their pets wreaking havoc on their festive celebrations. In New York, a dog ripped their Christmas present to shreds, spreading it all over their owner's living-room

People have shared hilarious pictures of their pets wreaking havoc on their festive celebrations. In New York, a dog ripped their Christmas present to shreds, spreading it all over their owner’s living-room

Feeling fessssstive? A pet lover shared a picture of their snake wearing a little Santa hat ahead of the holidays

Feeling fessssstive? A pet lover shared a picture of their snake wearing a little Santa hat ahead of the holidays

Ah, to be a service dog in hospital going around a ward in a Volkswagen toy car decorated with garlands, wearing sunglasses and a candy canes hat

Ah, to be a service dog in hospital going around a ward in a Volkswagen toy car decorated with garlands, wearing sunglasses and a candy canes hat

A poor small cat was caught tangled in their owner's Christmas tree's garlands. He kept his cool, though

A poor small cat was caught tangled in their owner’s Christmas tree’s garlands. He kept his cool, though

This black cat brazenly strutted away from their owners Christmas tree after taking it down, pictured

This black cat brazenly strutted away from their owners Christmas tree after taking it down, pictured

All hell broke loose when dog Juno tried to get a bite of cat Alvin at this California-based couple's house

All hell broke loose when dog Juno tried to get a bite of cat Alvin at this California-based couple’s house

Who is the real messiah around here? This cat evicted the baby Jesus from the manger at the local church

Who is the real messiah around here? This cat evicted the baby Jesus from the manger at the local church

It's not only cats who have a personal vendetta against Christmas trees, as this naughty dog proved

It’s not only cats who have a personal vendetta against Christmas trees, as this naughty dog proved

In California, a cat who wanted to help his owner decorate realised halfway through his climb up the ladder that he was scared of heights

In California, a cat who wanted to help his owner decorate realised halfway through his climb up the ladder that he was scared of heights

One Northwestern University student just wanted a nice picture of her cats by the tree but the two felines started fighting

One Northwestern University student just wanted a nice picture of her cats by the tree but the two felines started fighting

In North Carolina, this black dog got a little bit carried away while opening presents on Christmas Day

In North Carolina, this black dog got a little bit carried away while opening presents on Christmas Day

All this couple from Vegas wanted was a nice family picture at Christmas, but their cat was not camera ready

All this couple from Vegas wanted was a nice family picture at Christmas, but their cat was not camera ready

Bah humbug! The Spanish owners of his cat may have been feeling festive, but we're not so sure about the feline

Bah humbug! The Spanish owners of his cat may have been feeling festive, but we’re not so sure about the feline

You're not fooling anyone! This naughty dog was rumbled playing hide and seek in the Christmas tree

You’re not fooling anyone! This naughty dog was rumbled playing hide and seek in the Christmas tree

Businesses set for tough start to 2022 due to Omicron and inflation

A furry cunning plan! These cats banded together to try to take down the Christmas tree

A furry cunning plan! These cats banded together to try to take down the Christmas tree

A tiny rabbit who thought no one was watching was caught munching on a branch from the Christmas tree

A tiny rabbit who thought no one was watching was caught munching on a branch from the Christmas tree

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The underwater remains of a ship lost in battle more than 2,000 years ago off the coast of Sicily is now teeming with marine life.

Italian researchers found 114 marine animal species coexisting on remains of the warship that sunk during a fight between the Romans and Carthaginians.

The trove of life includes different types of snails, slugs, mollusks, worms and underwater moss creatures, all of which are located on the ram of the sunken a Carthaginian ship.

The ship sank on March 10, 241 BC during a sea battle near the Aegadian Islands off northwestern Sicily.

A fleet equipped by the Roman Republic destroyed a fleet from Carthage, ending the First Punic War in Rome’s favor – but the carnage made has now produced ‘a rich flowering of marine life.’ 

The underwater remains of a ship lost in battle more than 2,000 years ago off the coast of Sicily is now teeming with marine life

The underwater remains of a ship lost in battle more than 2,000 years ago off the coast of Sicily is now teeming with marine life

The ram, nicknamed ‘Egadi 13’, was recovered in 2017 from the seabed around 295 feet deep by marine archeologists from the Soprintendenza del Mare della Regione Sicilia, directed by Dr Sebastiano Tusa, in collaboration with divers from the organization Global Underwater Explorers.

But a recent analysis revealed the marine life thriving on the ancient ship remains.

Last author Dr Sandra Ricci, a senior researcher at Rome’s ‘Istituto Centrale per il Restauro’ (ICR), said in a statement: ‘Shipwrecks are often studied to follow colonization by marine organisms, but few studies have focused on ships that sank more than a century ago.’ 

Ricci and colleagues found a species-rich community, structurally and spatially complex, with 114 living invertebrate species. 

The ram is a little more than two feet long, about one inch thick at the front edge and weighs nearly 375 pounds. And because the ram is hollow, it has accumulated organisms and sediments inside as well as outside

The ram is a little more than two feet long, about one inch thick at the front edge and weighs nearly 375 pounds. And because the ram is hollow, it has accumulated organisms and sediments inside as well as outside

Italian researchers found 114 marine animal species coexisting on remains of the warship that sunk during a fight between the Romans and Carthaginians

Italian researchers found 114 marine animal species coexisting on remains of the warship that sunk during a fight between the Romans and Carthaginians

THE FIRST PUNIC WAR 

The First Punic War was the first of three wars fought between the Phoenicians of Carthage and Rome in the early third century BC.

The longest naval war of antiquity, the conflict raged from 264–241 BC in the waters around Sicily and North Africa.

It began when Roman forces gained a foothold on Sicily and, allied with the people of Syracuse, laid siege to the Carthaginian’s main base on the island, that of Akragas. 

Following this, Rome built a navy to rival that of the Phoenicians’ and, after a series of minor victories, launched an invasion of North Africa which was intercepted at the Battle of Cape Ecnomus — in what many consider, by the number of combatants, to be the largest naval battle of all time.

Beaten, Carthage sued for peace, but fought on after rejecting the Roman’s harsh terms for such.

After several years of effective stalemate, the Roman forces deployed a successful blockade of the garrisons at Drepana and Lilybaeum.

Carthage dispatched a fleet in 241 BC to relieve their outposts, but this was intercepted and bested at the Battle of the Aegates — in which the nimble Roman vessels deployed battering rams against their opponents to devastating effect. 

In the wake of the battle, Carthage sued for peace, ultimately surrendering Sicily to Roman control. 

These included 33 species of gastropods, 25 species of bivalves, 33 species of polychaete worms, and 23 species of bryozoans.  

Coauthor Dr Edoardo Casoli from Rome’s Sapienza University, said in a statement: ‘We deduce that the primary ‘constructors’ in this community are organisms such as polychaetes, bryozoans, and a few species of bivalves. Their tubes, valves, and colonies attach themselves directly to the wreck’s surface.’

‘Other species, especially bryozoans, act as ‘binders’: their colonies form bridges between the calcareous structures produced by the constructors. Then there are ‘dwellers’, which aren’t attached but move freely between cavities in the superstructure. What we don’t yet know exactly is the order in which these organisms colonize wrecks.’

Corresponding author Dr Maria Flavia Gravina concluded: ‘Younger shipwrecks typically host a less diverse community than their environment, with mainly species with a long larval stage which can disperse far. 

‘By comparison, our ram is much more representative of the natural habitat: it hosted a diverse community, including species with long and short larval stages, with sexual and asexual reproduction, and with sessile and motile adults, who live in colonies or solitary. 

‘We have thus shown that very old shipwrecks such as our ram can act as a novel kind of sampling tool for scientists, which effectively act as a ‘ecological memory’ of colonization.’

Egadi 13 is constructed out of a single, hallow piece of bronze and is engraved with an undeciphered Punic inscription – the ancient language of Carthaginians that was only found in the Mediterranean. 

The ram is a little more than two feet long, about one inch thick at the front edge and weighs nearly 375 pounds.

And because the ram is hollow, it has accumulated organisms and sediments inside as well as outside. 

The Romans and Carthaginians went to war in in 264 BC in what is called the First Punic War.

The civilizations battled for control of the western Mediterranean Sea. 

The ship sank on March 10, 241 BC during a sea battle near the Aegadian Islands off northwestern Sicily

The ship sank on March 10, 241 BC during a sea battle near the Aegadian Islands off northwestern Sicily

These included 33 species of gastropods, 25 species of bivalves, 33 species of polychaete worms, and 23 species of bryozoans

These included 33 species of gastropods, 25 species of bivalves, 33 species of polychaete worms, and 23 species of bryozoans

The war on March 10 was called the Battle of Aegusa, which saw the Roman fleet sink 50 Carthaginian ships that led to the  end of the First Punic War.

Accounts also say the Romans captured 70 more ships, although at the cost of 30 of their own ships and damage to 50 more. 

It is thought that the fleets of both sides originally numbered some 200 vessels. 

Rome became the dominant navy in the Mediterranean Sea, forcing Carthage to pay for war damages, and Rome took control of all of the Carthaginian lands on the island of Sicily.

THE CARTHAGINANS 

Pictured: the location of Cartage, with the extent of the Carthaginian Empire in blue

Pictured: the location of Cartage, with the extent of the Carthaginian Empire in blue

Ancient Carthage was a Phoenician civilization centered around Carthage, on the Gulf of Tunis, which founded by colonists from Tyre in 814 BC.

At its height during the fourth century BC, the city-state became the largest metropolis in world, with an empire that dominated the western Mediterranean. 

It had a mercantile network that extended from north Europe down to west Africa and across to west Asia.

Far less is known about Carthage’s peoples than those of ancient Rome or Greece, as most indigenous records were destroyed — along with the city — following the Third Punic War in 146 BC.

Their victory in this conflict paved the way for the Roman civilization to become the dominant power in the Mediterranean. 

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Woman is filmed carrying her pet LION through the streets after the young animal escaped in Kuwait

  • Footage shows the owner struggling to hold onto the big cat under its front legs
  • The animal is seen writhing around in its owners arms while growling loudly
  • Environmental police were called to Sabahiya area to help contain the animal 










This is the moment a woman carried her pet lion through the streets of Kuwait after the animal escaped from her home. 

Footage from Sabahiya, south of Kuwait City, shows the owner struggling to hold onto the big cat underneath its front legs as it thrashed around.

The short clip, which was posted on Sunday, shows the young animal writhing around in its owner’s arms while growling loudly. 

After walking several yards, the woman, seemingly exhausted, then put the animal on the ground as she took a rest from carrying it home. 

A lion can be seen in a video writhing in its owners arms as it tries to escape her grip a street in Kuwait

A lion can be seen in a video writhing in its owners arms as it tries to escape her grip a street in Kuwait

Woman carries pet lion home

Woman attempts to carry pet lion home

The woman, dressed in a black burkha, can be seen struggling to contain the big cat as it growls loudly 

The owner places the lion on the ground after being unable to carry it back to her property

The owner places the lion on the ground after being unable to carry it back to her property 

News website Al Anbaa reported on Sunday that the lion had escaped in the Sabahiya area, south of Kuwait City. 

According to Al Arabiya, environmental police were called to the scene. 

Officers helped the woman contain the big cat before it was returned to captivity.

Keeping exotic animals as pets is a popular phenomenon in many Gulf states, even though it is illegal, including in Kuwait.    

In Dubai, a new crackdown on owning dangerous animals was launched in June 2020 following reports of a wild cat roaming The Springs community – although it later transpired that the animal caught on film was actually a house cat.   

While both the UAE and Saudi Arabia have laws that ban the ownership of such pets, enforcement is lax.  

Big cats are popular status symbols within Saudi Arabia and the UAE where their wealthy owners flaunt them on Instagram (pictured)

Big cats are popular status symbols within Saudi Arabia and the UAE where their wealthy owners flaunt them on Instagram (pictured) 

In 2019, experts warned that cheetahs were at risk of dying out in eastern Africa because their cubs are being stolen and sold to wealthy Arab men as pets. 

Dr Laurie Marker, of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, told Mail Online that up to three quarters of cubs born to wild cheetahs in the Horn of Africa each year are being taken and sold to smugglers.

She warned that if action was not taken to end the trade, then the animals would die out within the next two years. 

Videos and images posted on Instagram and uncovered by Mail Online revealed how wealthy owners in Saudi Arabia and the UAE flaunt the big cats as status symbols, driving around with the animals in their cars and posing with them at home. 

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