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Pictured: The new multi-million-pound Tomb Raider attraction opening in London in 2022 (where ‘thrill-seeking’ visitors can join Lara Croft on ‘real-life’ missions)

  • Newly-released plans show the Tomb Raider: The Live Experience that is set to open in Camden next April 
  • Teams of eight will be assigned a mission to aid Lara Croft ‘on her pursuit to recover a powerful artefact’  
  • It’s promised that ‘beautiful scenic worlds’ and characters from Tomb Raider will ‘come to life’ in the attraction

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Prepare to release your inner Lara Croft.

Plans have been unveiled for a new ‘thrill-seeking’ experience in London – Tomb Raider: The Live Experience, which will open on April 1, 2022.

It’s no joke. The multi-million-pound attraction, which is set within Camden’s Stable Market, will invite ‘adventure-seekers’ to accompany Lara Croft ‘on her pursuit to recover a powerful artefact that has fallen into the hands of a dangerous enemy’.

Plans have been unveiled for a new multi-million-pound 'thrill-seeking' experience in London – Tomb Raider: The Live Experience (pictured)

Plans have been unveiled for a new multi-million-pound ‘thrill-seeking’ experience in London – Tomb Raider: The Live Experience (pictured) 

One rendering depicts a giant statue of Lara Croft towering over visitors at the attraction’s entrance. Another drawing shows a bird’s-eye view of each of the rooms in the interactive attraction, with what looks like a tropical jungle, a lava pit, and a snowy Alpine scene featuring in the new experience.  

A third, meanwhile, shows a woman ziplining through a forest scene, with a recreation of an ancient tomb in the background.

In teams of eight, visitors will be given missions to ‘escape a sinking ship, explore the jungles of Costa Rica, discover an ancient tomb, work through environmental puzzles and battle a secret order’.

Tomb Raider: The Live Experience, which is set to open in April 2022, will be based within Camden’s Stable Market

Tomb Raider: The Live Experience, which is set to open in April 2022, will be based within Camden’s Stable Market 

Live actors and characters from the Tomb Raider film and game franchise will ‘come to life’ in the attraction, which promises to be ‘complete with beautiful scenic worlds’.

A statement reads: ‘Your mission? To save the world.

‘Based on the ever-popular games and movies, Tomb Raider: The Live Experience allows for groups of families and friends to become part of the action and be immersed in the world of Tomb Raider.

‘It’s perfect for those who are looking for action and excitement and will launch visitors on the ride of their lives, joining Lara Croft in a real-life adventure.’

This rendering shows a woman ziplining through a forest scene, with a recreation of an ancient tomb in the background

This rendering shows a woman ziplining through a forest scene, with a recreation of an ancient tomb in the background

Film production company Little Lion Entertainment has partnered with video game developer Crystal Dynamics and entertainment company Square Enix to launch the attraction, which will span 30,000 square ft (2,787 metres sq).

Tom Lionetti-Maguire, the CEO and founder of Little Lion Entertainment Limited, says: ‘Not only will people be whisked into a fantasy narrative on this journey, but they will find surprises, adventure and wonderment around every trap-laden corner. “Unique” doesn’t even begin to describe how much this legendary explorer’s experience is going to take people’s breath away.

‘We make our guests the stars of the action, and what a wild time they are in for here.’

Pictured here is Lara Croft in the 2006 video game Tomb Raider: Legend

Pictured here is Lara Croft in the 2006 video game Tomb Raider: Legend

Angelina Jolie stars as Lara Croft in the 2001 action film Lara Croft: Tomb Raider

Angelina Jolie stars as Lara Croft in the 2001 action film Lara Croft: Tomb Raider 

The world first met Lara Croft in 1996, when video game Tomb Raider was released. After than, 11 more games followed, as well as several spinoffs and expansions. As of this year, over 85million Tomb Raider games have been sold worldwide.

The franchise hit the silver screen in 2001, with Angelina Jolie taking the lead role in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. She reprised the role two years later in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life. Alicia Vikander starred in a 2018 remake – Tomb Raider. A sequel, Tomb Raider 2, is currently in the works.

A Tomb Raider comic book series has been in distribution since 1997.

Early-bird tickets for the new attraction, priced at £77, are available now. General admission ticket sales will be on sale from December 15. 

For more information, visit tombraiderlive.co.uk.

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Pictured: The amazing floating five-star hotel in Dubai with motorised luxury villas attached by pontoons that can chug off to new locations (and each has its own private infinity pool)

  • The Kempinski Floating Palace will be anchored next to Jumeirah Beach in Dubai when it opens in 2023 
  • Twelve villas will encircle the resort’s hotel, and each can sail independently at jogging speed
  • The villas – described as ‘luxury houseboats’ by Swiss hotelier Kempinski – will be steered by private skippers 

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Here’s a hotel that might float your boat – one that will actually float.

New renderings showcase the Kempinski Floating Palace, a novel five-star resort ‘positioned as one of its kind’ with superyacht berths that will be anchored next to Dubai’s Jumeirah Beach when it opens in 2023.

Not only does the uber-luxurious resort float, but the 12 villas that encircle it will be able to detach from the main hotel and travel under their own power at jogging speed to a different location.

The above rendering shows the Kempinski Floating Palace, a five-star resort that's set to open in 2023

The above rendering shows the Kempinski Floating Palace, a five-star resort that’s set to open in 2023

Described as ‘luxury houseboats’ by Swiss hotelier Kempinski, these villas will be connected to the central 156-room hotel by pontoons.  

They will have a flat hull, feature a small cabin for crew accommodation and have a built-in engine. Guests can employ their own skipper to steer the villa or use one provided by the hotel. 

Conditions will dictate whether the villas will be able to anchor further afield – calm waters are required for setting sail. They cannot travel offshore and are not intended to be permanently anchored elsewhere.

The villas will be two-storey structures with between one and four bedrooms, as well as a private roof terrace and infinity pool.

They’ll also come equipped with ‘large panoramic windows and all the technical features of a smart home’. 

According to a statement, the villas have been designed to be environmentally friendly and will feature solar panels. Each property will be available for sale or for rent for those with cash to burn. 

This rendering shows one of 12 villas - having detached from the main building - sailing independently at night

This rendering shows one of 12 villas – having detached from the main building – sailing independently at night

Conditions will dictate whether the villas will be able to anchor further afield - calm waters are required for setting sail

Conditions will dictate whether the villas will be able to anchor further afield – calm waters are required for setting sail 

Guests will be able to arrive at the resort – which will be built by Seagate Shipyard – by speedboats, or alternatively can pull up in their own yacht. 

There’s a parking deck that will accommodate up to 16 boats, and larger yachts, according to a statement from Kempinski, will sail in and out of the main hotel through a central passageway. 

If this isn’t fancy enough, a floating helipad will be connected to the resort, so guests can make their arrival by air.

Renderings show that the main hotel will be divided into four parts, all joined together at the centre by a glass pyramid.

This building will house ‘every luxury of a five-star hotel, from exclusive gourmet restaurants, bars, spa and pools to boutiques and banquet areas’.

Those staying in the villas can avail themselves of each of these amenities.

Guests will be able to arrive at the resort by yacht - there will be a parking deck that will accommodate up to 16 boats

Guests will be able to arrive at the resort by yacht – there will be a parking deck that will accommodate up to 16 boats 

Discussing the new resort, Bernold Schroeder, CEO of Kempinski Group and Chairman of the Management Board of Kempinski AG, says: ‘We are delighted to be able to offer our guests in Dubai such a first experience from 2023 onwards, combining the destination’s reputation as a high-tech city with the timeless European elegance of Kempinski Hotels.

‘The highly innovative project by Seagate Shipyard convinces not only by its high-end technology but also through impeccable style and design.’

Mr Mohamed El Bahrawy, CEO and founder of Seagate Shipyard, adds: ‘It is thrilling to see, that for the first time a brand of the calibre of Kempinski will manage a floating hotel of such magnitude, and we are confident that our hotel will soon be one of the top tourist attractions in Dubai.’

Prices and the official opening date of the new resort have yet to be confirmed.

For more information visit kempinski.com.  

This building will house ¿every luxury of a five-star hotel, from exclusive gourmet restaurants, bars, spa and pools to boutiques and banquet areas¿

This building will house ‘every luxury of a five-star hotel, from exclusive gourmet restaurants, bars, spa and pools to boutiques and banquet areas’ 

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Reinventing the wheel! The amazing Japanese bus… that turns into a train in 15 seconds flat

  • The DMV bus, operated by Asa Seaside Railways, will link the Tokushima and Kochi prefectures in Shikoku
  • To drive on the tracks, the driver activates a ‘mode interchange’ to lower the bus’s rail-friendly steel wheels
  • It’s hoped that the DMV bus will boost tourism, with the route travelling past hot springs and coastal scenery 

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Japan can always be counted on to conjure up a wacky contraption – and the latest is a gem. 

Behold the bus that can turn into a train. 

This dual-mode vehicle, or ‘DMV’ for short, can transform from a road-going bus to a track-travelling train in just 15 seconds thanks to steel wheels that can be lowered onto the track at the press of a button. This ‘mode interchange’ goes into reverse when returning to the road, with the steel wheels retracting so the rubber tyres can take the lead.

The DMV bus (pictured above) can turn into a train in a matter of seconds

The DMV bus (pictured above) can turn into a train in a matter of seconds

The DMV can carry 23 people – including the driver – and measures around eight metres (26ft) in length. It weighs just 5,850kg (5.85 tons), making it significantly lighter than a regular train carriage.

On the tracks, it can travel at speeds of 60kmph (37mph), but on the road, it can go faster, depending on the speed limit.

It’s due to start operating on Christmas Day under Asa Seaside Railways, and will link the Tokushima and Kochi prefectures in Shikoku, one of the four main islands of Japan. 

The innovative dual-mode vehicle is due to start operating on Christmas Day under Asa Seaside Railways

The innovative dual-mode vehicle is due to start operating on Christmas Day under Asa Seaside Railways

The bus is equipped with road-friendly rubber tyres and steel wheels that can run on railway tracks

The bus is equipped with road-friendly rubber tyres and steel wheels that can run on railway tracks

Asa Seaside Railways currently has a fleet of three DMV buses - each brightly coloured in shades of green, red and blue

Asa Seaside Railways currently has a fleet of three DMV buses – each brightly coloured in shades of green, red and blue

A map showing where the DMV will operate

A map showing where the DMV will operate

Once up and running, the bus will travel from Awa Kainan Bunka Mura in the Tokushima prefecture to Umi no Eki Toromu in the Kochi prefecture. 

Asa Seaside Railways currently has a fleet of three DMV buses – each brightly coloured in shades of green, red and blue. 

The madcap form of transport is intended to attract tourism to the district and to ‘curb the depopulation’ of the area. 

Along the route, passengers can stop off at the Shishikui hot springs, one of the area’s biggest tourist draws.

It passes by beaches, the small rural town of Kaiyo, and a part of the coast that faces out onto the Pacific Ocean that’s ’ideal for sightseeing’, according to Asa Seaside Railways.

What’s more, the DMV can be used in the event of an earthquake, providing ‘rapid assistance’ to victims by either road or rail. 

Asa Seaside Railways also hopes that the DMV will strengthen the local transport system, particularly helping out the elderly local population.

A statement from Asa Seaside Railways reads: ‘The DMV is the “world’s first vehicle” that can run on both tracks and roads, making local transport more convenient.’ 

The madcap form of transport is intended to attract tourists and to ‘curb depopulation’

The madcap form of transport is intended to attract tourists and to ‘curb depopulation’

Asa Seaside Railways hopes that the DMV will strengthen the local transport system

Asa Seaside Railways hopes that the DMV will strengthen the local transport system

Dual-mode vehicles, also known as ‘road–rail vehicles’ or ‘hi-rail’, aren’t a new invention. They are most commonly used for maintenance and inspection purposes on railway tracks. 

Back in the 1930s, Britain trialled a road-rail bus – a modified single-decker bus – called the ‘Karrier Ro-Railer’ on the Nickey Line, a disused line in Hertfordshire. Though it was in operation for a few months, it proved unsuccessful. 

The concept has since been implemented across the globe with varying degrees of success – New South Wales Government Railways tried out a road-rail bus in Australia in the 1970s, and in Germany, the Schi-Stra-Bus was in operation from the 1950s to the 1970s.

The Schi-Stra-Bus, pictured above, was in operation from the 1950s to the 1970s in Germany. Picture courtesy of Creative Commons

The Schi-Stra-Bus, pictured above, was in operation from the 1950s to the 1970s in Germany. Picture courtesy of Creative Commons 

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Pictured: The incredible uninhabited Croatian island that looks like a giant fingerprint – thanks to an amazing network of walls built by local farmers in the 1800s

  • The tiny islet of Bavljenac is set in the Adriatic Sea and is one of 249 islands in the Sibenik archipelago  
  • It was used for agriculture by the inhabitants of neighbouring Kaprije island, who grew grapevines and fruit 
  • The stone walls have been part of the Unesco List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity since 2018

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We previously brought you Croatia’s heart-shaped island via the incredible aerial photography of Peter Rajkai. 

Now we can reveal that the country’s bodily-themed geology doesn’t end there – because it also harbours an island that looks like a giant fingerprint from the air. 

It’s called Bavljenac, with the fingerprint effect created by a network of old stone walls and a distinctive oval shape, as a Google Earth picture shows. 

Croatia harbours an island that looks like a giant fingerprint - Bavljenac, also known as Baljenac (pictured)

Croatia harbours an island that looks like a giant fingerprint – Bavljenac, also known as Baljenac (pictured) 

Bavljenac's fingerprint effect is created by a network of old stone walls and, as this Google Earth picture shows, a distinctive oval shape

Bavljenac’s fingerprint effect is created by a network of old stone walls and, as this Google Earth picture shows, a distinctive oval shape 

Bavljenac, also known as Baljenac, is uninhabited and covers an area of 0.14 square km. The stone walls, if joined together, would run for 23km (14 miles).

According to the Croatian National Tourist Board, the island – found in the Adriatic Sea – was used for agriculture by farmers on neighbouring Kaprije island.   

They cleared Bavljenac’s ‘harsh vegetation’ to make room for fig and citrus trees, as well as grapevines, building a web of stone walls to protect the crops from the wind, and to divide up the plots.

These waist-high stone walls – dating back to the 1800s – were created using a technique known as ‘dry stone walling’, which involves carefully stacking and interlocking rocks. 

Bavljenac is uninhabited and covers an area of 0.14 square km. The stone walls, if joined together, would run for 23km (14 miles)

Bavljenac is uninhabited and covers an area of 0.14 square km. The stone walls, if joined together, would run for 23km (14 miles)

Bavljenac was used as an agricultural area by the inhabitants of neighbouring Kaprije island (pictured above)

Bavljenac was used as an agricultural area by the inhabitants of neighbouring Kaprije island (pictured above) 

The Croatian National Tourist Board describes the island as a 'sun-kissed islet, once dotted with vineyards and groves overflowing with figs and citrus scents'

The Croatian National Tourist Board describes the island as a ‘sun-kissed islet, once dotted with vineyards and groves overflowing with figs and citrus scents’

'is one of 249 islands in the Sibenik archipelago. Those who wish to visit can take a boat tour around the island, with Archipelago Tours , for example. However, these tours cannot dock on the island as there is no pier or harbour

Bavljenac is one of 249 islands in the Sibenik archipelago. Those who wish to visit can take a boat tour around the island, with Archipelago Tours, for example. However, these tours cannot dock on the island as there is no pier or harbour

While the fruit trees are no more, the stone walls remain and have been protected since 2018 as part of the Unesco List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The tourist board says: ‘They [the walls] are a witness to the times when hard work, tenacity and resilience were key to taming the harsh, yet stunning, karst landscape of the Adriatic coast. 

‘Bavljenac, the sun-kissed islet, once dotted with vineyards and groves overflowing with figs and citrus scents, now it is a tribute to cultural wealth and Mediterranean tranquillity waiting to be relished and rediscovered.’

It's hard not to fall in love with this beautiful shot, which shows privately owned Galesnjak, a rare naturally occurring heart-shaped island in the Adriatic's Pasman Canal. There isn't much on the island, apparently, except some wild plants and a colony of rabbits

It’s hard not to fall in love with this beautiful shot by Instagrammer Peter Rajkai, which shows privately owned Galesnjak, a rare naturally occurring heart-shaped island in the Adriatic’s Pasman Canal

The fingerprint-shaped island’s nearest hub is Sibenik (pictured above), a historic city in central Dalmatia

The fingerprint-shaped island’s nearest hub is Sibenik (pictured above), a historic city in central Dalmatia 

Those who wish to visit can take a boat tour around the island, with Archipelago Tours, for example. However, these tours cannot dock on the island as there is no pier or harbour.

Bavljenac’s nearest hub is Sibenik, a historic city in central Dalmatia, with the island one of 249 in the Sibenik archipelago.

The heart-shaped island, meanwhile, which is privately owned and officially called Galesnjak, lies further to the north in the Adriatic’s Pasman Canal. There isn’t much on it, apparently, except some wild plants and a colony of rabbits.

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At a glance, this tower block looks halfway to being demolished.

But it’s actually a brand new development in Amsterdam – and very close to completion, deliberately designed to look like huge chunks have been knocked out of it.

The 75,000-square-metre (807,293-square-ft) complex, called ‘Valley’, was designed by Dutch architecture firm MVRDV – which created the controversial Marble Arch Mound in London. Valley, due to open in 2022, features three ‘peaks’ – the tallest of which is 100m (328ft) high. MVRDV says that the spectacular development is ‘reminiscent of a carved-out block’.

'Valley' is a brand new development in Amsterdam that was deliberately designed to look like huge chunks have been knocked out of it

‘Valley’ is a brand new development in Amsterdam that was deliberately designed to look like huge chunks have been knocked out of it

The 75,000-square-metre (807,293-square-ft) complex, designed by the Dutch architecture firm MVRDV, is close to completion

The 75,000-square-metre (807,293-square-ft) complex, designed by the Dutch architecture firm MVRDV, is close to completion

Pictures show that one side of the building is completely mirrored. According to the architects, this ‘reflective exterior facade is supposed to ‘reflect’ the building’s corporate surroundings in Amsterdam’s Zuidas business district.

The other side of the building, however, was designed ‘in direct contrast’ to the corporate facade. Once completed, it will feature ‘rugged, stone terraces with large planters, covering the building in vegetation’. 

These stone terraces are currently visible, but the plants have yet to grow. 

The acclaimed Dutch landscape architect Piet Oudolf designed the building’s green spaces, which will be made up of 13,000 different plants and trees.

The incredible new building features three ¿peaks¿ - the tallest of which (pictured on the right) is 100m (328ft) high

The incredible new building features three ‘peaks’ – the tallest of which (pictured on the right) is 100m (328ft) high

MVRDV says that the spectacular development is ¿reminiscent of a carved-out block¿

MVRDV says that the spectacular development is ‘reminiscent of a carved-out block’

Inside the building, a large atrium – known as ‘The Grotto’ – will be illuminated by large skylights built into the ceiling.

Members of the public will be able to enjoy drinks at the development’s ‘Sky Bar’, which will be spread across two storeys in the highest tower. There, they will enjoy ‘panoramic views over Amsterdam’.

The rest of the building, which is being developed by Edge Technologies, will feature 200 apartments and roof gardens, as well as seven storeys of offices, a three-storey underground parking lot and ‘various retail and cultural facilities’.

Inside the building, a large atrium - known as ¿The Grotto¿ (pictured) - will be illuminated by large skylights built into the ceiling

Inside the building, a large atrium – known as ‘The Grotto’ (pictured) – will be illuminated by large skylights built into the ceiling

A view of The Grotto's skylights. The building will feature 200 apartments, roof gardens, and seven storeys of offices

A view of The Grotto’s skylights. The building will feature 200 apartments, roof gardens, and seven storeys of offices

On the fourth and fifth storeys of the building, there will be a space known as the ‘central valley area’, which will be accessed via a ‘path’ from the street level. Pedestrians who travel along the path will pass shops, terraces and gardens on their way up. 

A statement from the design firm says: ‘In twenty years, the Zuidas area of Amsterdam has developed into the main international business centre, which resulted in a reduced focus on residential interests. 

‘The development of Valley is part of the city’s ambition to correct this by transforming the area into a more liveable and complete urban quarter, welcoming large amounts of residents and additional public facilities to the area over the next decade.’

Once completed, the building will feature ¿rugged stone terraces with large planters, covering the building in vegetation¿

Once completed, the building will feature ‘rugged stone terraces with large planters, covering the building in vegetation’

One side of the building is completely mirrored. According to the architects, this ¿reflective exterior facade is supposed to 'reflect' the building's corporate surroundings in Amsterdam¿s Zuidas business district

A rendering shows what ¿Valley¿ will look like when it¿s completed. The acclaimed Dutch landscape architect Piet Oudolf designed the building¿s green spaces

One side of the building is completely mirrored (pictured left). According to the architects, this ‘reflective exterior facade is supposed to ‘reflect’ the building’s corporate surroundings in Amsterdam’s Zuidas business district. On the right, a rendering shows what ‘Valley’ will look like when it’s completed. The acclaimed Dutch landscape architect Piet Oudolf designed the building’s green spaces

MVRDV’s Marble Arch Mound, a £6million artificial hill on London’s Park Lane, was met by a wave of visitor complaints and online criticism when it opened in July. It was likened to a ‘slag heap’ and described as ‘the worst attraction in London’. 

But MVRDV defended the attraction, blaming ‘challenging weather’ and how ‘unpredictable’ it is working with plants and trees for how it looked at the time.

The firm also designed the gold-studded Ragnarock music museum in Denmark, a ‘Balancing Barn’ holiday home in Suffolk, and the incredible Imprint complex in South Korea, which contains a nightclub and a theme park.

For more information visit mvrdv.nl


Pictured: The stunning £252million superyacht designed to look like a ‘superluxury skyscraper’ that changes the skyline of each city it sails through

  • The ‘Malena’, which measures 85ft from the waterline to the top of the mast, accommodates up to 24 guests
  • ‘We wanted to create the feeling of being on a superluxury skyscraper,’ the designers say
  • It’s estimated that the megayacht would set prospective buyers back an estimated £210million to £252million

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What happens when you cross a superyacht and a skyscraper? You get the ‘Malena’.

The striking £252million superyacht measures 360ft (110m) in length, 85ft (26m) from the waterline to the top of the mast, and features tiers of balconies that look ‘much like those found on luxury residential apartments’. 

Josh Rodriguez, who owns Rodriguez Design, the firm behind the concept, says: ‘With the side balcony system, we wanted to create the feeling of being on a superluxury skyscraper. Wherever the yacht is docked or moored, the city will have a new addition to its skyline.’

The 'Malena’, pictured above, is a new yacht concept by naval architecture firm Rodriguez Design

The ‘Malena’, pictured above, is a new yacht concept by naval architecture firm Rodriguez Design

The superyacht design features tiers of balconies that look ‘much like those found on luxury residential apartments’

The superyacht design features tiers of balconies that look ‘much like those found on luxury residential apartments’

Rodriguez Design, which is based in Dubai and Spain, set out to ‘steer away from traditional yacht design’ in creating Malena. 

How much will this stylish behemoth set you back? The price of the yacht will depend on the shipyard and the finishing materials, but we’re told that the yacht would cost an estimated €250million (£210million) to €300million (£252million).  

The boat can accommodate 24 guests in 11 cabins, the layout comprising six VIP cabins on the main deck, four double cabins on the lower deck and one owner’s apartment, which features a hot tub and dining area.

One feature that’s sure to make a splash is the ‘hydraulic swimming platform’, from which guests can jump into the water.

Rodriguez Design says: ‘With the side balcony system, we wanted to create the feeling of being on a superluxury skyscraper'

Rodriguez Design says: ‘With the side balcony system, we wanted to create the feeling of being on a superluxury skyscraper’

The lower deck, pictured on the left, will feature two 29.5ft (9m) by 11.4ft (3.5m) infinity pools

The lower deck, pictured on the left, will feature two 29.5ft (9m) by 11.4ft (3.5m) infinity pools

The lower deck, meanwhile, features two 29.5ft (9m) by 11.4ft (3.5m) infinity pools, along with sunbeds and a bar area that can seat up to seven people.

There will be two sets of ‘hidden stairs’ in the interior, which lead to the ‘alfresco dining area’ on the upper deck, seating up to 24 people. For added intrigue, a working compass will be ‘embedded into the woodwork’ of the dining table.

The upper deck will also boast a lounge area and a helipad, which can accommodate an Airbus ACH160 helicopter ‘or similar’.

The boat will accommodate 24 guests in 11 cabins, with the layout including an owner's apartment and six VIP cabins

The boat will accommodate 24 guests in 11 cabins, with the layout including an owner’s apartment and six VIP cabins

The sun deck, pictured, will feature a hot tub and a bar for seven people. A statement describes this deck as the ’perfect scenario for a big party or any other social gathering’

The sun deck, pictured, will feature a hot tub and a bar for seven people. A statement describes this deck as the ’perfect scenario for a big party or any other social gathering’

Rodriguez Design estimates that it would take between four and five years to carry out the build of the Malena

Rodriguez Design estimates that it would take between four and five years to carry out the build of the Malena

Finally, the sun deck – which Rodriguez Design says is also known as the ‘party deck’ – will feature another hot tub and more seating areas, as well as a bar.

A statement describes this deck as the ‘perfect scenario for a big party or any other social gathering’. 

The Malena will be able to reach a maximum speed of 18 knots (20mph), and will be propelled by a diesel-electric hybrid system coupled with a gearless steerable propulsion system.

Rodriguez Design estimates that it would take between four and five years to build the boat. Though it’s currently just a concept, the firm confirmed that it is in talks with a shipyard and a client regarding the design.   

For more information visit instagram.com/rodriguezyachtdesign.

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Pictured: The £7.5million ‘Ferrari-of-the-seas’ hyperyacht that can hit 85mph and comes with a garage for the owner’s supercar

  • The 88ft Gran Turismo Mediterranea will set a prospective owner back €9million (£7.5million/$10million) 
  • The boat features supercar-style gull-wing side openings and foil wings that deploy at speeds of over 23mph
  • Amenities on the boat include a sundeck, three to four bedrooms, a kitchen and a cabin for crew 

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A stunning new hyperyacht has been unveiled that’s been described by the designers as a ‘Ferrari of the seas’ – and it even comes with a garage for the owner’s road-going Ferrari (though they’ll need to be careful about getting it splashed with saltwater).

Behold the 88ft nine-million-euro (£7.5million/$10million) Gran Turismo Mediterranea, which also features supercar-style gull-wing side openings and has enough power to hit 75 knots – about 85mph.

The creator, Rome-based Lazzarini Design Studio, reveals that the boat has foil wings that deploy to lift the boat – which comes in a Ferrari-style red – out of the water at speeds exceeding 20 knots (23mph).

A stunning new hyperyacht, pictured above, has been unveiled that's been described by the designers as a 'Ferrari of the seas'

A stunning new hyperyacht, pictured above, has been unveiled that’s been described by the designers as a ‘Ferrari of the seas’

The creator reveals that the Gran Turismo Mediterranea has foil wings that deploy to lift the boat out of the water at speeds exceeding 20 knots (23mph)

 The creator reveals that the Gran Turismo Mediterranea has foil wings that deploy to lift the boat out of the water at speeds exceeding 20 knots (23mph)

The garage is located at the back of the yacht, and is formed by a platform that can also be used as a sundeck.

Making their way into the interior of the hyperyacht, passengers will enter an atrium that leads to the upper and lower cabins.

The lower level of the yacht features a ‘large living room’ with a kitchen, and space for three to four guest bedrooms, as well as one bedroom for two crew members. This space will be fully customisable by the yacht’s owner.

The boat - which comes in a Ferrari-style red - has a garage for the owner's road-going Ferrari (or similar)

The boat – which comes in a Ferrari-style red – has a garage for the owner’s road-going Ferrari (or similar)

The garage is at the back of the yacht, and is formed by a platform that can also be used as a sundeck (pictured)

The garage is at the back of the yacht, and is formed by a platform that can also be used as a sundeck (pictured)

The lower level of the yacht, pictured, features a ‘large living room’ with a kitchen, and space for three to four guest bedrooms

The lower level of the yacht, pictured, features a ‘large living room’ with a kitchen, and space for three to four guest bedrooms

The upper level of the yacht encompasses a second living area, as well as the captain’s cabin.

Various ‘automotive design’ references influenced the appearance and the function of the yacht, according to a statement. 

For example, a ‘hood scoop’, a feature that typically improves the passage of air through the engine of a motor car, was implemented into the design.  

The upper level of the yacht, pictured, encompasses a second living area, as well as the captain’s cabin

The upper level of the yacht, pictured, encompasses a second living area, as well as the captain’s cabin

Various 'automotive design’ references influenced the appearance and the function of the yacht

Various ‘automotive design’ references influenced the appearance and the function of the yacht 

The 88ft nine-million-euro (£7.5million/$10million) Gran Turismo Mediterranea features supercar-style gull-wing side openings

The 88ft nine-million-euro (£7.5million/$10million) Gran Turismo Mediterranea features supercar-style gull-wing side openings

It will be powered by 6,600 brake-horsepower engines and weigh under 22 tonnes.

A statement adds that the yacht can ‘cruise at elevated speeds with extreme sailing comfort’. 

This isn’t the first amazing design that Lazzarini has dreamt up – it is also responsible for a swan-shaped superyacht, a £450million shark-inspired mega-yacht, and a sleek yacht with a gaping hole in the middle.

The Gran Turismo Mediterranea is currently a concept and would cost ‘about nine million euros to make it real’. For more information visit lazzarinidesignstudio.com.

The boat, powered by 6,600 brake-horsepower engines, has enough power to hit 75 knots - about 85mph

 The boat, powered by 6,600 brake-horsepower engines, has enough power to hit 75 knots – about 85mph

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The Fifa World Cup takes place in Qatar later this year and one of the contest’s eight stadiums is unlike any venue that’s ever hosted a World Cup game before.

Stadium 974 is made primarily from repurposed shipping containers and capable of being completely dismantled and put back together like Lego after the tournament is over.

Located near Doha Port, the innovative 40,000 seat venue consists of a modular steel frame and 974 shipping containers – hence the name of the stadium.

Stadium 974 (pictured) is made primarily from repurposed shipping containers and capable of being completely dismantled and put back together after the tournament is over

Stadium 974 (pictured) is made primarily from repurposed shipping containers and capable of being completely dismantled and put back together after the tournament is over

The innovative 40,000 seat venue consists of a modular steel frame and 974 shipping containers. Many of the containers are used to form the exterior walls around the stadium. Others are located inside the structure and filled with the likes of toilets and concession stands

 The innovative 40,000 seat venue consists of a modular steel frame and 974 shipping containers. Many of the containers are used to form the exterior walls around the stadium. Others are located inside the structure and filled with the likes of toilets and concession stands

Many of the containers are used to form the exterior walls around the stadium. Others are located inside the structure and filled with the likes of toilets and concession stands.

The whole structure has been built in such a way that it can be deconstructed at any time and either rebuilt in another location or refashioned into a series of smaller venues.

Conceived by Spanish architecture firm Fenwick Iribarren, the stadium’s design was initially inspired by Lego bricks.

The unusual building material was chosen to lower construction costs and to improve the sustainability of the venue by reducing both the waste generated during the production of stadium components and the waste created on-site during construction.

The combination of the stadium’s waterside location and its bowl-shaped design, meanwhile, avoids the need for air conditioning as it is naturally ventilated, which further improves its sustainability. 

H.E. Hassan Al Thawadi, secretary general of the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC), which is the organisation responsible for preparing Qatar’s infrastructure for the World Cup said: ‘We consider this innovative venue a game-changer for future mega-event hosts. It is another example of the powerful legacy our World Cup will leave.’

Conceived by Spanish architecture firm Fenwick Iribarren, Stadium 974's design was initially inspired by Lego bricks

Conceived by Spanish architecture firm Fenwick Iribarren, Stadium 974’s design was initially inspired by Lego bricks

The combination of the stadium's waterside location (shown in this image) and its bowl-shaped design avoids the need for air conditioning as it is naturally ventilated

The combination of the stadium’s waterside location (shown in this image) and its bowl-shaped design avoids the need for air conditioning as it is naturally ventilated

Stadium 974, which also shares its name with the dialing code of Qatar, will host seven matches during the 2022 Fifa World Cup

Stadium 974, which also shares its name with the dialing code of Qatar, will host seven matches during the 2022 Fifa World Cup

‘We consider this innovative venue a game-changer for future mega-event hosts. It is another example of the powerful legacy our World Cup will leave,' said H.E. Hassan Al Thawadi, secretary general of the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC), which is the organisation responsible for preparing Qatar’s infrastructure for the World Cup

‘We consider this innovative venue a game-changer for future mega-event hosts. It is another example of the powerful legacy our World Cup will leave,’ said H.E. Hassan Al Thawadi, secretary general of the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC), which is the organisation responsible for preparing Qatar’s infrastructure for the World Cup

The Fifa World Cup 2022 will kick off on November 21 with an opening ceremony at the 60,000 seat Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor.

Stadium 974, which also shares its name with the dialing code of Qatar, will host seven matches during the tournament.

Other Qatar World Cup venues include Khalifa International, Al Janoub, Education City, Ahmad Bin Ali and Al Thumama.

The Khalifa International Stadium in Doha has a striking eye-shaped design

The Khalifa International Stadium in Doha has a striking eye-shaped design

Education City Stadium in Doha has an exterior with an eye-catching zig-zag aesthetic

Education City Stadium in Doha has an exterior with an eye-catching zig-zag aesthetic

Al Janoub Stadium is a futuristic-looking oval venue with a capacity for 40,000 people

Al Janoub Stadium is a futuristic-looking oval venue with a capacity for 40,000 people

The Fifa World Cup 2022 will kick off on November 21 with an opening ceremony at the 60,000 seat Al Bayt stadium, pictured, in Al Khor

The Fifa World Cup 2022 will kick off on November 21 with an opening ceremony at the 60,000 seat Al Bayt stadium, pictured, in Al Khor

Khalifa International, also in Doha, has a striking eye-shaped design. Al Janoub is a futuristic-looking oval venue. Education City has zig-zagged sides. Ahmad Bin Ali has more of a conventional look to it.

Al Thumama, meanwhile, is shaped like a gahfiya – a traditional woven cap adorned by men and boys across the Middle East for centuries. 

The design of Lusail Stadium, meanwhile, has been inspired by ‘the interplay of light and shadow that characterises the fanar lantern’.

Al Thumama Stadium's inauguration was as host of the 49th Amir Cup Final on Friday 22 October, 2021

Al Thumama Stadium’s inauguration was as host of the 49th Amir Cup Final on Friday 22 October, 2021 

The 80,000-seat Lusail Stadium - it is here that the Fifa World Cup Qatar 2022 final will be staged

The 80,000-seat Lusail Stadium – it is here that the Fifa World Cup Qatar 2022 final will be staged

The Qatar World Cup has attracted its fair share of scrutiny over the past months. It has experienced hostility from neighbours, been subject to corruption investigations and faced criticism over worker abuses.

Further protests from both players and rights groups are expected to take place over the coming months, although World Cup organisers are defensive.

Organizing committee CEO Nasser Al Khater recently said: ‘Qatar has been unfairly treated and scrutinised for a number of years.’


Prospective homeowners with a head for heights will love this new development in Vancouver – because it has rooms that cantilever out over the street.

Pictures reveal how these floating rooms make the stunning new residential tower resemble a game of Jenga. Being inside one will ‘create the sensation of floating high above the city, the ocean, and the mountains’, says Ole Scheeren, the renowned German architect behind the condominium.

Construction of the 42-storey tower, called ‘Fifteen Fifteen’, is under way in the Coal Harbour neighbourhood of the Canadian city, with 2026 projected as the year it’ll open.

The 'Fifteen Fifteen' development in Vancouver has rooms that cantilever out over the street

The ‘Fifteen Fifteen’ development in Vancouver has rooms that cantilever out over the street 

The cantilevered glass-enclosed rooms, reinforced by steel columns, are a feature of the 18 ‘Observatory Residences’ in the building. These apartments, likened to ‘glass boxes in the sky’, are on the market with a starting price of £3.2million (5.6million Canadian Dollars). 

The entryway to each ‘Observatory Residence’ will feature oak flooring, and the bathrooms will be embellished with ‘a floating vanity’ and terrazzo walls.

Moving up the tower, there will be four penthouses available from the 39th to the 42nd floors of the building, each with balconies, ‘generous ceiling heights’ and open-plan kitchens.

The 42-storey tower is set to be built in Vancouver's Coal Harbour neighbourhood and is due to open in 2026

The 42-storey tower is set to be built in Vancouver’s Coal Harbour neighbourhood and is due to open in 2026

Pictures reveal how the floating rooms make the stunning new residential tower resemble a game of Jenga

Pictures reveal how the floating rooms make the stunning new residential tower resemble a game of Jenga

Gliding back down the tower, the Sky Lounge – another cantilevered space – will be situated on level 29, and will offer ‘270-degree panoramas’ of Vancouver. This lounge area will be exclusive to residents, and boasts ‘towering double-height windows’. 

A statement describes the communal area as ‘the most dramatic space in all of Vancouver’. The architect explains: ‘It was a very important decision to give one of the best spaces in the entire building to all the residents.’

Elsewhere in the tower, there will be studio apartments and one, two, and three-bedroom homes, ranging in size from 1,089 sq feet (101 sq metres) to over 3,000 sq feet (279 sq metres). 

The leisure centre will be situated on level four, offering an ‘intimate, boutique-style experience much like a private gym in one’s own home’.  

Being inside one of the cantilevered rooms will 'create the sensation of floating high above the city, the ocean, and the mountains’, say the architects

Being inside one of the cantilevered rooms will ‘create the sensation of floating high above the city, the ocean, and the mountains’, say the architects 

A rendering shows one of the apartments in the complex. The building was designed by German architect Ole Scheeren

A rendering shows one of the apartments in the complex. The building was designed by German architect Ole Scheeren

Pictured is a rendering of the open-plan kitchen in one of the four penthouses in the building

Pictured is a rendering of the open-plan kitchen in one of the four penthouses in the building

The tower features studio apartments and one, two, and three-bedroom homes, ranging in size from 1,089 sq feet (101 sq metres) to over 3,000 sq feet (279 sq metres)

The tower features studio apartments and one, two, and three-bedroom homes, ranging in size from 1,089 sq feet (101 sq metres) to over 3,000 sq feet (279 sq metres)

It will house a gym with ’expansive full-height windows’, so residents get a glorious view while working out, a dedicated yoga studio and an outdoor terrace, ‘where in warmer weather residents can practice yoga while enjoying a breeze among the treetops’.

A private dining room and bar area will also occupy space in the building. 

This area, which can be reserved by residents for ‘intimate dinners or cocktail parties’, leads out to a balcony that offers ‘views of downtown and nature’. 

Pictured is the communal cantilevered Sky Lounge, which will be situated on level 29 and will offer ‘270-degree panoramas’ of Vancouver

Pictured is the communal cantilevered Sky Lounge, which will be situated on level 29 and will offer ‘270-degree panoramas’ of Vancouver

A statement describes the Sky Lounge area, pictured, as ‘the most dramatic space in all of Vancouver’

A statement describes the Sky Lounge area, pictured, as ‘the most dramatic space in all of Vancouver’

Residents will be able to look through the gym’s ’expansive full-height windows’ while they work out

Residents will be able to look through the gym’s ’expansive full-height windows’ while they work out

There will be a dedicated yoga studio and an outdoor terrace, ‘where in warmer weather residents can practice yoga while enjoying a breeze among the treetops’

There will be a dedicated yoga studio and an outdoor terrace, ‘where in warmer weather residents can practice yoga while enjoying a breeze among the treetops’

The entranceway to the complex will be framed by a ‘shimmering golden canopy’. 

Just inside the door, residents will find the lobby area – ‘an elegant space’ with wooden wall-panelling, terrazzo floors, and ‘an illuminated gold-tone water feature that brings an element of nature indoors’.

There are plans in place for the ground floor to also feature a cafe with ‘large windows and outdoor seating overlooking a landscaped plaza and [a] water feature’. 

The car park will be situated in the basement, and there, residents will have their automobiles ‘retrieved by a full-time valet at a moment’s notice’. The adjoining valet station is described as a ‘dramatic space resembling a cutting-edge art gallery, with polished concrete floors’.

There will be a private dining room and bar area (pictured) in the building that can be reserved by residents to ‘host intimate dinners or exclusive cocktail parties’

There will be a private dining room and bar area (pictured) in the building that can be reserved by residents to ‘host intimate dinners or exclusive cocktail parties’

There are plans in place for a cafe on the ground floor of the tower (pictured), which will feature ‘large windows and outdoor seating overlooking a landscaped plaza and [a] water feature’

There are plans in place for a cafe on the ground floor of the tower (pictured), which will feature ‘large windows and outdoor seating overlooking a landscaped plaza and [a] water feature’

The entranceway to the complex, pictured above, will be framed by a ‘shimmering golden canopy’

The entranceway to the complex, pictured above, will be framed by a ‘shimmering golden canopy’

A rendering shows the valet station in the basement. Residents will have their automobiles ‘retrieved by a full-time valet at a moment’s notice’

A rendering shows the valet station in the basement. Residents will have their automobiles ‘retrieved by a full-time valet at a moment’s notice’

According to a statement, environmentally-friendly materials and ‘energy-efficient systems’ were implemented in the design of the building. The properties in the tower also feature ‘advanced filtration systems that deliver purified air and water’. 

With the complex, the developers hope to achieve a Leed (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold international sustainability certification.

The building, developed by Bosa Properties and Kingswood Properties, is described as ‘precision-driven architecture, at its finest’. 

The building, developed by Bosa Properties and Kingswood Properties, is described as ‘precision-driven architecture, at its finest’

The building, developed by Bosa Properties and Kingswood Properties, is described as ‘precision-driven architecture, at its finest’

Residences within the complex are already on the market. Prices for studio apartments start from £523,488 (900,000 Canadian Dollars), and two and three-bedroom residences are priced from £1.2million (2.2million Canadian Dollars)

Residences within the complex are already on the market. Prices for studio apartments start from £523,488 (900,000 Canadian Dollars), and two and three-bedroom residences are priced from £1.2million (2.2million Canadian Dollars)

Scheeren says: ‘For many years, I have explored the question of how we want to live in relation to our own private spaces as well as our communities, our cities, and the environment – and what architecture means in this context.

‘Born from an idea of three-dimensional living, Fifteen Fifteen’s strong sculptural form introduces horizontality to an urban tower. Its distinctive silhouette flows from the idea of activation. Fifteen Fifteen is about connectivity – connecting people to each other and to their surroundings – and offers an interactive way of living.’ 

Residences within the complex are already up for sale. Prices for studio apartments start from £523,488 (900,000 Canadian Dollars), and two and three-bedroom residences are priced from £1.2million (2.2million Canadian Dollars). For more information visit fifteen-fifteen.bosaproperties.com/en.