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Renderings were recently unveiled for a stunning floating condo called Somnio, which will offer ultra-luxury apartments starting at £8.1million. 

But she’s by no means the only option for a cruise-ship-style life at sea. The Utopia and The World residential ships have already attracted buyers. But they too are expensive, with residences costing from $4.4million (£3.2million) in the case of Utopia and from $2million (£1.4million) for The World.

However, there is good news for those with shallower pockets who want to live on a cruise ship. MV Narrative, a ‘residential community at sea’, has one to four-bedroom apartments and studios starting at just $366,667 (£268,170).

The new Storylines boat MV Narrative (pictured) has one to four-bedroom apartments and studios starting at just $366,667 (£268,170)

The new Storylines boat MV Narrative (pictured) has one to four-bedroom apartments and studios starting at just $366,667 (£268,170)

There will be 627 residences on the 741ft- (226 m) long Storylines ship, which is currently being built in Croatia and is due to launch in 2024. 

Florida-based Storylines says that its primary focus is on ‘providing more affordable entry-level options into the condo ship market’. The lowest-priced home is the 237-sq-ft (22 sq m) ’Discover’ apartment. 

The cost will soar, however, for those in the market for one of the two-storey penthouses, which are worth up to $8million (£5.8million). These homes can stretch to 1,970 sq ft (183 sq m).

There will also be the option to avail of a 12 month or 24-month lease, and owners can rent out their properties to make some money through Storylines’ ‘Guest at Sea’ rental program.

The ship will be all-inclusive, but residents will be charged a ‘living fee’ to cover expenses like maintenance and food.

Storylines' MV Narrative, pictured, is billed as a new ‘residential community at sea’

Storylines’ MV Narrative, pictured, is billed as a new ‘residential community at sea’

This rendering shows one of the more affordable options - the 'Breeze' home. The bedrooms will feature queen-size Murphy beds and 'luxury' mattresses to ‘ensure maximum comfort at night’

This rendering shows one of the more affordable options – the ‘Breeze’ home. The bedrooms will feature queen-size Murphy beds and ‘luxury’ mattresses to ‘ensure maximum comfort at night’

Pictured is a lower-priced 'Explore' home on MV Narrative. The most affordable residence is the 237-sq-ft (22 sq m) ’Discover’ apartment

Pictured is a lower-priced ‘Explore’ home on MV Narrative. The most affordable residence is the 237-sq-ft (22 sq m) ’Discover’ apartment

Each home will be fully furnished with ‘Italian designed’ furnishings, and residents can choose between two different layouts for their properties. Pictured is a mid-range 'Dream' apartment

Each home will be fully furnished with ‘Italian designed’ furnishings, and residents can choose between two different layouts for their properties. Pictured is a mid-range ‘Dream’ apartment 

Each apartment will be fully furnished with ‘Italian-designed’ items, and residents can choose between two different layouts for their properties. 

Every home will be decked out with full kitchens, flat-screen TVs, ‘climate control’ systems, adjustable mood lighting and stereo speakers, and the bedrooms will feature queen-size murphy beds and ‘luxury’ mattresses to ‘ensure maximum comfort at night’.

When the MV Narrative is offshore, homeowners can wine and dine at the ship’s 20 bars and restaurants, which include an oyster bar, a Chinese restaurant, and an ‘ice creamery’. They can also order twenty-four-seven from a home delivery service.

A bathroom in a 'Global' two-storey penthouse. These homes are priced up to $8million (£5.8million)

A bathroom in a ‘Global’ two-storey penthouse. These homes are priced up to $8million (£5.8million)

A kitchen area of the 'Global' two-storey penthouses on the ship, which is due to launch in 2024

A kitchen area of the ‘Global’ two-storey penthouses on the ship, which is due to launch in 2024

Each home will be decked out with flat-screen TVs, ‘climate control’ systems, adjustable mood lighting and stereo speakers. Pictured is a bedroom in one of the penthouses

Each home will be decked out with flat-screen TVs, ‘climate control’ systems, adjustable mood lighting and stereo speakers. Pictured is a bedroom in one of the penthouses

There will be ‘resident choice’ days on the ship, where those living on board get to choose where the MV Narrative docks next. Pictured is the upper level of a penthouse

There will be ‘resident choice’ days on the ship, where those living on board get to choose where the MV Narrative docks next. Pictured is the upper level of a penthouse

As for entertainment, the ship will feature one cinema, a microbrewery, three pools and a 10,000-book library.

The Spa and Wellness Centre will encompass a salon, a juice bar, a yoga studio, and a whirlpool. A statement notes that the spa is ‘perfectly situated with sweeping 180-degree views’.

What’s more, there’ll be a golf simulator, an art space, and a dance floor. A statement adds: ‘Residents are encouraged to start special interest clubs; perhaps you are a chess, photography, wine, astronomy or bridge aficionado? Start a club or join in on the fun.’

Lectures and workshops ‘on and off the ship’ will also cover topics such as architecture, finance, local geography, philanthropy and art history. 

Pictured is the ship's 10,000-book library. Lectures and workshops ‘on and off the ship’ will also cover topics such as architecture, finance, local geography, philanthropy and art history

Pictured is the ship’s 10,000-book library. Lectures and workshops ‘on and off the ship’ will also cover topics such as architecture, finance, local geography, philanthropy and art history

One of three pools on board. The ship's Spa and Wellness Centre will feature a yoga studio, and a whirlpool

One of three pools on board. The ship’s Spa and Wellness Centre will feature a yoga studio, and a whirlpool

Pictured is the ship's Marina Lounge. Residents will be charged a ‘living fee’ to cover expenses such as maintenance and food on board the ship

Pictured is the ship’s Marina Lounge. Residents will be charged a ‘living fee’ to cover expenses such as maintenance and food on board the ship

The ship will spend between one and five days docked in ports around the world. A sample itinerary shows that residents will be able to explore the likes of Venice, the Maltese capital of Valletta, and Athens on a tour around the Mediterranean. 

There will also be ‘resident choice’ days, where those living on board get to choose where the ship docks next. Residents are welcome to invite guests on board when the ship is docked.  

For more information visit storylines.com.

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Full steam ahead was never going to be on the agenda.

Amazing video footage shows the mammoth Odyssey of the Seas cruise ship being very carefully pulled out to sea from the shipyard where she was built.

The fascinating ‘conveyance’ video begins in the Meyer Werft shipyard in Papenburg, Germany, and it documents the Royal Caribbean Quantum-class cruise ship travelling along the River Ems and out to the North Sea.

Amazing video footage shows the mammoth Odyssey of the Seas cruise ship, pictured, being very carefully pulled out to sea

Amazing video footage shows the mammoth Odyssey of the Seas cruise ship, pictured, being very carefully pulled out to sea

This 32km (20-mile) journey down the river takes more than 10 hours, with the ship passing through two bridges, over the Emstunnel, and finally through the Ems Barrier.

The river is incredibly narrow and shallow for a ship of this scale – Odyssey of the Seas measures 41m (135ft) wide and 347m (1,138ft) long and weighs 167,704 gross tonnes.

Two powerful tugboats – each with 9,000 horsepower – push and pull the ship. The video explains: ‘The faster she moves, the deeper the hull pushes into the water, so it’s important to move slowly.’

The video begins as the ship faces its first hurdle – the Papenburg Lock.

The video begins as the ship faces its first hurdle - leaving the shipyard to pass through the Papenburg Lock

The video begins as the ship faces its first hurdle – leaving the shipyard to pass through the Papenburg Lock

The river is incredibly narrow and shallow for a ship of this scale - Odyssey of the Seas measures 41m (135ft) wide and 347m (1,138ft) long

The river is incredibly narrow and shallow for a ship of this scale – Odyssey of the Seas measures 41m (135ft) wide and 347m (1,138ft) long

‘There’s almost no clearance on either side of the [Papenburg Lock] so rollers (pictured) are used to gently guide the ship through,’ the narrator explains

‘There’s almost no clearance on either side of the [Papenburg Lock] so rollers (pictured) are used to gently guide the ship through,’ the narrator explains

Two powerful tugboats - each with 9,000 horsepower - are used to push and pull the ship

Two powerful tugboats – each with 9,000 horsepower – are used to push and pull the ship 

‘There’s almost no clearance on either side of the lock so rollers are used to gently guide the ship through,’ the narrator explains. 

There is minimal clearance as the ship proceeds through the Weener Bridge and the Leer Bridge. She’s squeezing through the most incredibly narrow gaps – with sometimes just inches between the structures. 

Odyssey of the Seas negotiates the swing Leer Bridge at a walking pace of just two to three knots.

As the ship passes through Leer Bridge, pictured, there is minimal clearance for passage

As the ship passes through Leer Bridge, pictured, there is minimal clearance for passage

Odyssey of the Seas negotiates the swing Leer Bridge at a walking pace of just two to three knots

Odyssey of the Seas negotiates the swing Leer Bridge at a walking pace of just two to three knots 

Odyssey of the Seas travelling along such a relatively small river is a surreal sight

Odyssey of the Seas travelling along such a relatively small river is a surreal sight 

‘An experienced crew of local pilots help guide the way and manoeuvre the ship at all times,’ the narrator says

‘An experienced crew of local pilots help guide the way and manoeuvre the ship at all times,’ the narrator says

Above you'll see the ship cross over the Emstunnel, which is part of an Autobahn, or motorway

Above you’ll see the ship cross over the Emstunnel, which is part of an Autobahn, or motorway

The narrator notes that the ship is guided backwards – this makes for better manoeuvrability. 

‘An experienced crew of local pilots help guide the way and manoeuvre the ship at all times,’ the narrator says.

He adds: ‘The conveyance is precisely planned around the weather and the tides. It must happen around a full or new moon – that’s when the river is the highest. It requires a wind speed of 20 knots or less without gusts.’

The last challenge is for Odyssey of the Seas to pass through the Ems barrier, pictured above

The last challenge is for Odyssey of the Seas to pass through the Ems barrier, pictured above 

ODYSSEY OF THE SEAS BY THE NUMBERS 

Odyssey of the Seas is Royal Caribbean’s fifth Quantum-class ship. Guests can roam 16 decks – eight of which have balcony staterooms overlooking the sea. The ship can accommodate 5,498 guests and there are 1,550 international crew members onboard. 

Midway through the voyage, the ship crosses over the Emstunnel, which is part of an autobahn, or motorway.

The footage shows the enormous vessel on the horizon, with traffic continuing to flow along the autobahn in the foreground.  

Odyssey of the Seas has to pass through the Ems Barrier at the end of the journey when the sea and river water levels match.

This helps to avoid strong currents, the narrator explains. 

The ship, which can cruise at 22 knots, intended to make her maiden voyage on July 3, but it was postponed when eight crew members tested positive for coronavirus.

She finally set sail on July 31 from Port Everglades, Florida, on an eight-day cruise around the southern Caribbean, stopping off in Dutch Antilles and CocoCay in the Bahamas. 

MailOnline Travel’s Jo Kessel was on board and declared that it’s ‘impossible to be bored’. 

Odyssey of the Seas has 16 decks – eight of which have balcony staterooms overlooking the sea.

The ship can accommodate 5,498 guests and there are 1,550 international crew members onboard.

She will be sailing Caribbean voyages from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, until April 2022. From May till October 2022, Odyssey will be in the Mediterranean, sailing to Greece and Turkey from Rome. 

Visit www.royalcaribbean.com for more information. 

MailOnline Travel's Jo Kessel declared that it's 'impossible to be bored' on Odyssey of the Seas

MailOnline Travel’s Jo Kessel declared that it’s ‘impossible to be bored’ on Odyssey of the Seas

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Snow is seen GLOWING in Russia after tiny bioluminescent animals wash ashore from the White Sea: This is the first time in 80 years that faint blue lights are spotted in the Arctic

  • A faint blue glow was spotted in the snow surrounding a field station in Russia 
  • Scientists concluded the glow was caused by  tiny bioluminescent animals called copepods
  • The  copepods washed ashore from the nearby White Sea during a high tide










The holidays are filled with lights hanging from homes and store fronts, but in remote part of Russia biologists are seeing festive twinkles in the snow.

This was observed by biologists working in the Arctic off the coast of the White Sea, who spotted faint blue lights glowing in the white powder.

Vera Emelianenko, a microbiologist staying at a remote field station, collected some of the snow, placed it under a microscope and found the glow was from tiny bioluminescent animals called copepods.

Dubbed the bugs of the sea, these creatures are typically found in the ocean at depths of up to 300 feet during the day and then just a few feet at night.

Scroll down for video 

The holidays are filled with lights hanging from homes and store fronts, but in remote part of Russia biologists are seeing festive twinkles in the snow

The holidays are filled with lights hanging from homes and store fronts, but in remote part of Russia biologists are seeing festive twinkles in the snow

Ksenia Kosobokova, an expert on Arctic marine zooplankton at Russia’s Academy of Science in Moscow, told National Geographic that the copepods were likely caught in a powerful current in the White Sea that brought them ashore.

Tides on December 1, when the glowing snow was first posted, were exceptionally high and again on December 16,  which suggests the stronger tides forced the copepods on to land – this species of copepod is called Metridia longa.

Bioluminescence is a natural phenomenon that is caused by a chemical reaction.

This happens when chemical energy is covered to light energy, which only happens in a creature carrying a molecule called luciferin.

Vera Emelianenko, a microbiologist staying at a remote field station, collected some of the snow, placed it under a microscope and found the glow was from tiny bioluminescent animals called copepods

Vera Emelianenko, a microbiologist staying at a remote field station, collected some of the snow, placed it under a microscope and found the glow was from tiny bioluminescent animals called copepods

Dubbed the bugs of the sea, these creatures are typically found in the ocean at depths of up to 300 feet during the day and then just a few feet at night

Dubbed the bugs of the sea, these creatures are typically found in the ocean at depths of up to 300 feet during the day and then just a few feet at night

When luciferin reacts with oxygen it creates light energy that appears like a stunning glow.

For some copepods, the luciferin and luciferase react internally, but Metridia longa has glands on its head and body to secrete its incandescence into the world.

Steven Haddock, a marine biologist studying deep-sea zooplankton at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, told National Geographic: ‘They’ll shoot out those two molecules at the same time and form a little puff of light in the water.’

The copepods glowing in the snow were believed to be alive when Kosobokova spotted them, as the tiny animals can survive extremely low temperatures.

This was observed by biologists working in the Arctic off the coast of the White Sea, who spotted faint blue lights glowing in the white powder

This was observed by biologists working in the Arctic off the coast of the White Sea, who spotted faint blue lights glowing in the white powder

Bioluminescence is a natural phenomenon that is caused by a chemical reaction. This happens when chemical energy is covered to light energy, which only happens in a creature carrying a molecule called luciferin

Bioluminescence is a natural phenomenon that is caused by a chemical reaction. This happens when chemical energy is covered to light energy, which only happens in a creature carrying a molecule called luciferin

Tides on December 1, when the glowing snow was first posted, were exceptionally high and again on December 16, which suggests the stronger tides forced the copepods on to land – this species of copepod is called Metridia longa. Pictured is the White Sea

Tides on December 1, when the glowing snow was first posted, were exceptionally high and again on December 16, which suggests the stronger tides forced the copepods on to land – this species of copepod is called Metridia longa. Pictured is the White Sea

However, Haddock notes they could be dead, as fireflies still glow after being squished.

‘It happens for us with our scientific specimens,’ he added. ‘You collect an organism and you put it in the freezer for later study. And then when you pull it out, it will slowly start to glow—the chemicals that are inside of their bodies are still perfectly capable of reacting.’

Perhaps what’s most surprising is that glowing snow had not been seen before at a biological station that’s been active for over 80 years.

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Energy tycoon Dale Vince has called for North Sea operators to be hit with a windfall tax after enjoying a £20billion boost from surging gas prices.

The millionaire founder of green energy supplier Ecotricity said a levy on gas generators should be used to ease the burden of rising energy bills, which are expected to soar this year.

Companies extracting gas have seen revenues spike as global wholesale prices have rocketed almost tenfold over the last year.

The crisis has forced 26 suppliers to go bust since August as the UK’s energy price cap has left them unable to pass on the rises to consumers. Households are braced for annual energy bills to hit £2,000 after the cap rises in April.

Vince said a levy on gas generators should be used to ease the burden of rising energy bills

Vince said a levy on gas generators should be used to ease the burden of rising energy bills

Vince told The Mail on Sunday: ‘It’s our North Sea. It’s happening in our territory. To use Brexit language, let’s take control of that. Let’s have a windfall tax. It will help spread the cost of bill price shock over the next few years.

‘Around 40 per cent of our gas this winter came from the North Sea. The cost of getting it out of the North Sea didn’t go up, but we paid up to ten times more for that gas than we used to because it’s tied to global prices.’

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng last year said a one-off windfall tax was one of the options for handling the energy crisis. Windfall taxes are sometimes seen as a Left-wing means of tackling corporations benefiting from crises. 

The former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn called for a North Sea tax in 2019 and Lib Dem leader Ed Davey last week demanded the introduction of such a levy.

However, Margaret Thatcher’s government imposed windfall taxes on North Sea oil and gas companies as well as banks in the early 1980s.

Detractors say such a tax could slow investment into renewables. Oil and gas titans such as BP and Shell have been retreating from the North Sea in recent years. 

A growing number of companies operating there are now backed by private equity firms, overseas governments and smaller listed players.

Vince, a former New Age traveller, set up Ecotricity from a single wind turbine in 1995

Vince, a former New Age traveller, set up Ecotricity from a single wind turbine in 1995

However, Shell retains significant operations and last week it announced that its profits would be ‘significantly higher’ due to the market conditions.

Vince said: ‘Those guys weren’t expecting that money and they won’t be doing anything good with it. We shouldn’t allow the siphoning of £20 billion out of our economy into the hands of North Sea operators.’

He added: ‘Price rises are coming. All the Government has done is delay them and bankrupted half the energy sector in the process.’

The former New Age traveller set up Ecotricity from a single wind turbine in 1995. The business now serves 200,000 customers. 

Ecotricity’s losses widened to £6.5million last year, but Vince said it would return to the black this year, aided by the sale of Electric Highway – a charging network for electric cars.

An attempt to buy rival Good Energy, in which it has a 25 per cent stake, failed last autumn, and Vince admits he got cold feet on the deal as the energy crisis emerged. ‘It was a blessing for us that we failed’, he said.

Vince said the government’s plan to switch households from gas boilers to heat pumps is ‘half baked’ and will cost £300billion. ‘Our alternative is to make gases from grass and put that into the gas grid, rather than ripping everybody’s boilers out.’

Ecotricity will next year begin a trial of a new system in Reading which mimics a cow’s stomach, converting grass into gas which will power 4,000 homes. The venture can be scaled up to create 100,000 jobs in the rural economy, he says.

Vince said Chancellor Rishi Sunak should scrap the collection of green taxes on suppliers – which include the renewables obligation charge to the feed-in tariff designed to accelerate investment into renewables. 

He believes these levies are being passed on in the form of an extra £9billion, or £300 a household, to bills each year. Instead, the energy industry should be subsidised from a central pot of government funds not reliant on industry levies, he said.

Vince said Chancellor Rishi Sunak should scrap the collection of green taxes on suppliers

Vince said Chancellor Rishi Sunak should scrap the collection of green taxes on suppliers

He added: ‘That would be a decent contribution from government to just take that away. Why are the government taxing our energy bills like this?

‘We put billions into trains, but we don’t have that cost to a train ticket. We subsidise farming to make food cheaper but don’t tax people at the supermarket checkout.’

The businessman believes Westminster’s understanding of the energy market has been sharpened by the collapse of Bulb, which has been propped up by government loan as administrators hunt for a buyer or a new home for its customers. 

He blasts Bulb and others who he claimed have given the green energy industry a bad name. ‘They used the illusion of super low prices to attract customers who had benefited with super low prices, but they were loss making and went bankrupt.’

Vince’s collection of business ventures have included designing an electric supercar, running football club Forest Green Rovers and selling ‘carbon negative’ diamonds.

He launched the Skydiamond brand selling laboratory grown diamonds online and will soon unveil a tie up with a London designer jeweller.

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