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Peloton bosses sold more than £360m worth of stock before fitness firm’s share price crashed










Bosses at exercise bike maker Peloton sold stock worth more than £360million before the share price crashed last year.

Chief executive John Foley and other executives offloaded millions of shares at prices over $100 before a profit warning triggered a plunge in November, US filings show.

The fitness company, whose bikes start at £1,350, had already taken a hit in May when it recalled all its treadmills in the US and the UK after a child died when he was dragged underneath the machine.

Peloton - whose flagship bikes start at £1,350 - had already taken a hit in May when it recalled all of its treadmills in the US and the UK after a child died when he was dragged underneath the machine.

Peloton – whose flagship bikes start at £1,350 – had already taken a hit in May when it recalled all of its treadmills in the US and the UK after a child died when he was dragged underneath the machine.

It then had a high-profile setback in December when a lead character in Sex and the City, Mr Big, died after an intense Peloton workout in the first episode of the TV show’s reboot, And Just Like That. 

Analysts said that it raised questions of whether ‘Peloton is losing degrees of control over its storytelling’.

Peloton released a spoof advert starring Mr Big actor Chris Noth, which was pulled when assault allegations against him emerged. 

Peloton floated on the US Nasdaq in 2019.

Its shares have nosedived by almost 80 per cent in the past year. Last night its stock was worth $31.84.

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The latest Ford Mondeo – the family car that gave us ‘Mondeo Man’, the so-called middle-ground voter who could swing elections – has been unveiled today, showing a sharp new design that’s aimed at buyers of executive models.

But it won’t be sold to Britons.

That’s because the all-new fifth-generation Mondeo is exclusively for the Chinese market, while the long-running saloon car will be axed from UK showrooms in just a matter of months.

Ford's new Mondeo that Britons can't buy: This is the fifth-generation family saloon that is exclusively for the Chinese market

Ford’s new Mondeo that Britons can’t buy: This is the fifth-generation family saloon that is exclusively for the Chinese market

Ford announced last year that it will cease production of the Mondeo for Europe in March 2022. It will end a 29-year run for Mondeo man

Ford announced last year that it will cease production of the Mondeo for Europe in March 2022. It will end a 29-year run for Mondeo man

Ford has taken the covers off the new Mondeo at its China Design Centre in Shanghai on Monday.

The Mondeo has been sold in China since 2002, almost a decade after it hit UK showrooms and five years after it was famously used as a campaign tool by Tony Blair and New Labour to secure swing voters in its landslide victory to take power in 1997. 

Mondeo Man long ago traded in his saloon for an SUV and the swing voters have since been dubbed Qashqai Dad and Mum.

Ford bosses describe the next-generation Mondeo as a ‘sporty coupe-style sedan brimming with technology and showcasing Ford’s bold new design language for China’.

Mondeo has been sold in China since 2002, some 9 years after it hit UK showrooms

Mondeo has been sold in China since 2002, some 9 years after it hit UK showrooms

Bosses describe the next-generation car as a 'sporty coupe-style sedan brimming with technology and showcasing Ford's bold new design language for China'

Bosses describe the next-generation car as a ‘sporty coupe-style sedan brimming with technology and showcasing Ford’s bold new design language for China’

Commenting on the new car, Maurizio Tocco, chief designer at Ford Motor Company, said: ‘To design the next generation of a well-known nameplate such as Mondeo was a privilege and a challenge for our team.

‘We wanted to respect and acknowledge the history which had come before us while elevating the customers’ experience to the next level. 

‘The starting point of the design is always the customer and looking for innovative ways to incorporate what they need and want into the design.’ 

Ford unveiled the new fifth-generation Mondeo at its China Design Centre in Shanghai on Monday

Ford unveiled the new fifth-generation Mondeo at its China Design Centre in Shanghai on Monday

The new Mondeo will be sold in China with the choice of a turbocharged 1.5-litre and 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engines - and a plug-in hybrid at a later date

The new Mondeo will be sold in China with the choice of a turbocharged 1.5-litre and 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engines – and a plug-in hybrid at a later date

This new Mondeo will be produced in a joint venture between Ford and Chinese firm Changan in Chongqing and is set to hit showrooms from the second quarter of 2022

This new Mondeo will be produced in a joint venture between Ford and Chinese firm Changan in Chongqing and is set to hit showrooms from the second quarter of 2022

It will be sold with the choice of a turbocharged 1.5-litre and 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engines, the latter offering up to 238bhp.

A plug-in hybrid version will follow at a later date, though there are no plans for a fully-electric variant. 

The four-door saloon will be produced in a joint venture between Ford and Chinese firm Changan in Chongqing and is set to hit showrooms from April.

But while it might also venture to the US as a replacement for the Fusion, it won’t be made available in Europe – a decision that was made clear by Ford bosses last year. 

Mondeo Man to be killed off in two months: Ford has confirmed the 29-year run for the once-popular family car will end in March when Mondeo production is halted for good

Mondeo Man to be killed off in two months: Ford has confirmed the 29-year run for the once-popular family car will end in March when Mondeo production is halted for good

Ford to kill off the Mondeo in Britain from March

The car maker announced that the Mondeo will be ‘phased out’ of Ford’s range by March next year due to ‘changing fashions’, notably the growing demand for SUVs and market shift away from family saloon cars.

The company said in a statement issued last March: ‘As Ford moves to an all-electric passenger vehicle future, European consumer preferences continue to change.

‘In 2020, 39 per cent of Ford’s passenger vehicle sales were SUVs and crossovers – up eight percentage points from 2019.

‘Moreover, customers are showing more confidence in electrification technologies, with more than 50 percent of Kuga owners purchasing a Kuga plug-in hybrid.’

Landing the killer blow, it added: ‘As a result of this growing change in customer preference, Ford will phase out the Mondeo, its large car, at the end of March next year.

The existing Mondeo (pictured) will remain on sale in the UK until March but then be removed from the European market entirely

The existing Mondeo (pictured) will remain on sale in the UK until March but then be removed from the European market entirely 

The existing Mondeo - the fourth-generation car - is currently priced from £27,155

The existing Mondeo – the fourth-generation car – is currently priced from £27,155

Ford recently tried to boost the appeal of the Mondeo with the introduction of hybrid versions. However, it did little to improve sales

Ford recently tried to boost the appeal of the Mondeo with the introduction of hybrid versions. However, it did little to improve sales

‘Ford’s other large crossover and multi-purpose vehicles – the seven-seat Ford Galaxy and Ford S-MAX – will continue in production, with full hybrid versions of both recently launched.’

A Ford spokesman added: ‘The market segment in which Mondeo competes has been dwindling for years and is down about 80 per cent since the start of the century.

‘Our rationale is pretty much the same as others have said recently… all down to changing customer preference as consumers opt for SUVs and crossovers, and the fact that we’re evolving our passenger vehicle range in Europe to meet those changing customer needs as we move to an all-electric future.’ 

The term 'Mondeo Man' - used to represent ‘Middle Britain’ and the successor to Sierra Man – was cited as sweeping the Tony Blair Labour government to a landslide victory in 1997

The term ‘Mondeo Man’ – used to represent ‘Middle Britain’ and the successor to Sierra Man – was cited as sweeping the Tony Blair Labour government to a landslide victory in 1997

The Mondeo took the British Touring Car Championship title in 2000 in the hands of Alain Menu. Pictured: Menu's teammate Anthony Reid, who finished as runner-up in the driver's standings in the 2000 BTCC season

The Mondeo took the British Touring Car Championship title in 2000 in the hands of Alain Menu. Pictured: Menu’s teammate Anthony Reid, who finished as runner-up in the driver’s standings in the 2000 BTCC season

The Ford Mondeo has even played a role on the silver screen. It was used in 2006 Bond film Casino Royale, driven by Daniel Craig in his maiden appearance as 007

The Ford Mondeo has even played a role on the silver screen. It was used in 2006 Bond film Casino Royale, driven by Daniel Craig in his maiden appearance as 007

Mondeos have been a firm favourite with police forces for three decades

Mondeos have been a firm favourite with police forces for three decades

Launched in 1993, the Mondeo was the first Ford vehicle to be hailed as a ‘global’ car and was the first in the UK to come as standard with airbags.

Since its launch in Europe where it replaced the Ford Sierra, Mondeo sales have reached around five million to date.

It also had a successful competed in the racing world, notably winning the British Touring Car Championship in 2000 and featuring in other series across Europe.

The Mondeo even played a role in a Bond film, driven by Daniel Craig in his maiden appearance as 007 in 2006 movie Casino Royale – earning him the title ‘Bondeo Man’. 

Mondeo has also been a firm favourite of police forces up and down the country for years, and remains one of the patrol cars of choice even today. 

The Mondeo was seen as a game-changer in the family-model sector when it hit the market. Even Jeremy Clarkson rated it

The Mondeo was seen as a game-changer in the family-model sector when it hit the market. Even Jeremy Clarkson rated it

The Mondeo was, in first-generation guise, available as a hatchback and this marginally longer saloon variant

The Mondeo was, in first-generation guise, available as a hatchback and this marginally longer saloon variant

Practical and good to drive, the Mondeo won over plenty in the motor industry - even if the looks weren't to all tastes

Practical and good to drive, the Mondeo won over plenty in the motor industry – even if the looks weren’t to all tastes

When Ford brought the Mondeo to market in 1993, it was the first model to have airbags as standard across trim levels

When Ford brought the Mondeo to market in 1993, it was the first model to have airbags as standard across trim levels

The existing model remains on sale in the UK until March, with prices currently starting from £27,155. 

Ford last attempted to boost appetite for its former flagship model by launching hybrid versions of both the Mondeo hatchback and estate in 2019 to tempt buyers already in the market for greener family wagons, but with little success. 

In 2001 Ford sold more than 86,500 Mondeos, but annual sales slipped to a mere 2,400 units in 2020 – and even less in 2021 with manufacturers enduring semiconductor shortages.

In 1997, Ford updated the mk1 Mondeo with rounder looks that became a huge hit with Britons

In 1997, Ford updated the mk1 Mondeo with rounder looks that became a huge hit with Britons

Ford has had some interesting advertising campaigns for Mondeo throughout its near-three-decade-long tenure, including one featuring Tom and Jerry

Ford has had some interesting advertising campaigns for Mondeo throughout its near-three-decade-long tenure, including one featuring Tom and Jerry

The second-generation Mondeo was available in UK dealership from 2001 and remained on sale until 2007

The second-generation Mondeo was available in UK dealership from 2001 and remained on sale until 2007

This third generation of the Ford Mondeo was introduced in 2007

This third generation of the Ford Mondeo was introduced in 2007

The third-generation Mondeo was facelifted in 2010 and remained on sale until 2014, when the current car replaced it. By this time, SUV popularly had seen Mondeo sales dip

The third-generation Mondeo was facelifted in 2010 and remained on sale until 2014, when the current car replaced it. By this time, SUV popularly had seen Mondeo sales dip 

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The number of £5million-plus luxury homes sold in London in the final months last year reached a record high, new research has revealed.

The return of international travel bringing overseas buyers, along with a desire for more space from super-rich domestic buyers of London homes, contributed to more wealthy purchasers forking out at least £5million to secure the right home in the capital.

There were 522 sales of such homes in 2021, with 163 sales of £5million-plus properties in the last three months of that year alone.

It is 37 per cent higher than in the three months prior and the strongest year end since 2013 which saw 522 so called ‘super prime’ sales, according to the research by Savills estate agents.

This three-bed house in Moore Street, in London's Chelsea, is for sale for £5.5million via Martin & Co estate agents

This three-bed house in Moore Street, in London’s Chelsea, is for sale for £5.5million via Martin & Co estate agents

Savills took at look at the number of luxury property sales in the capital over the past decade

Savills took at look at the number of luxury property sales in the capital over the past decade

The last three months of last year saw the highest quarterly spend for any quarter since Savills records began in 2006, with almost £2billion spent on properties agreed for £5million or more.

This can largely be attributed to the number of £20million-plus sales of both new build and second-hand property, which stood at 51 verses 32 a year earlier in 2020.

There was also a significant uptick in the number of £10million-plus sales in the last three months of 2021, which reached the strongest quarter ever with 62 sales compared to a previous high of 50 in the final quarter of 2014.

The previous high was a result of many households rushing to buy before new higher stamp duty tax bands were introduced at that point in 2014.

This five-bed house in Montpelier Walk in London's Knightsbridge is for sale for £7.95m via James Vaughan estate agents

This five-bed house in Montpelier Walk in London’s Knightsbridge is for sale for £7.95m via James Vaughan estate agents

Savills highlighted that the super-prime new build market also ramped up at the end of the year.

There were 30 new build sales in London topping £5million in the final three months of 2021, with a total value of £558million, it said.

It is both the highest number of units topping £5million sold, and the highest total value spent on new build property, ever recorded in a single quarter.

Frances Clacy, of Savills, said: ‘London’s super-prime markets stellar end to the year is evidence of the influence that the pandemic-fuelled desire for more space has on residential markets.

‘While we can expect to see demand from domestic buyers looking to upsize into a larger family home soften in the new year, a lack of suitable stock on the market will continue to support prices, while the supply-demand imbalance remains.

‘It’s also clear that domestic and UK-domiciled international buyers are taking advantage of the opportunity to buy in a market that still represents relative value and before a more sustained return of overseas demand. 

‘Recovery in prime central London values is certainly underway, but revived Covid-19 restrictions are likely to push the forecasted 8 per cent-plus bounce back in values further into 2022.’

This six-bed house in Chelsea's Milner Street is on the market for £6.95m via Hamptons estate agents

This six-bed house in Chelsea’s Milner Street is on the market for £6.95m via Hamptons estate agents

Savills explained that with international travel rules easing in November, there was a significant uptick in the number of international buyers returning to the capital.

As a result, central London hotspots continued to dominate sales and more than half of all £5million-plus sales took places in Kensington, Chelsea, Belgravia, Notting Hill and Knightsbridge, knocking leafier St Johns Wood, out of the top five from the quarter prior.

However, the £5million-plus price tag continues to extend its reach across London, as buyers race for more space, with locations such as Wimbledon, Battersea, East Sheen and Wandsworth firmly on the so-called super-prime map, as buyers look to reap the benefits of ‘country-style’ homes in the capital.

There was a 84 per cent increase in the number of £5million-plus sales across South West London in 2021, compared to 2020, according to Savills.

For the last three months of 2021, it said the price of a six- or more bedroom house in west London rose by 10.4 per cent during the past year and by 15.1 per cent since March 2020, and by 9.1 per cent and 12.1 per cent in South West London.

Ollie Marshall, of buying agents Prime Purchase, said: ‘There is no question that there is more money flooding into the top end of the property market in London than at any time in the past 20 years.

London has always offered a safe haven in times of volatility 

‘The global recovery, which has been driven by central bank intervention as a result of 2009’s global financial crisis, has generated extraordinary gains for investors around the world. 

‘Since 2016, while the majority of property markets have trended higher, London has endured a five-year bear market in the face of prolonged political uncertainty surrounding Brexit. The result now is a dislocation of values between London and other global financial centres such as New York Singapore and Shanghai, with the former much more attractive than the latter.

‘London has always offered a safe haven in times of volatility, and at no time has this been more evident than during a global pandemic. 

‘With many markets now looking frothy, as well as inflation concerns and currency debasement, investors looking to reposition their portfolios are considering London property once again. 

‘Yields for residential property have reached levels not seen for over a decade and international investors taking advantage of continued weakened sterling are still able to secure generous discounts from the peak in 2016.’ 

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The pandemic has done very little to quell the demand for classic cars in the last couple of year, with auction sales continuing to hit record levels despite the global impact of Covid-19 on economies and wealth.

The emergence of new dedicated websites for a raft of collectible models, such as Collecting Cars and The Market, means petrol heads have increased opportunity to buy and sell vehicles of all generations and value, while data show that appetite remains high at the premium end of the market where motors sell for millions.

Here, we list the 10 cars that went under the hammer across the globe in 2021 and sold for the highest figures…

10. 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta ‘Tour de France’

Price paid: £4.3million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale, California, USA (14 August 2021)

This is 52nd of just 72 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdFs produced in the fifties. The paint is an Alfa Romeo colour called Giulietta blue, which makes this particular car stand out

This is 52nd of just 72 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdFs produced in the fifties. The paint is an Alfa Romeo colour called Giulietta blue, which makes this particular car stand out

There were just 72 250 GT LWB Berlinetta Tour de France built in total, with chassis number 1031 GT the 52th to come off the production line.

Sold at RM Sotheby’s highlight event of the classic car calendar at Monterey Car Week in California, the stunning Ferrari went to the highest bidder for a fee of $6million – around £4.3million.

This is a particularly unique example, being that it originally was – and still is – finished not in an official Ferrari paint colour but an Alfa Romeo palette called ‘Giulietta Blue’ and complemented by a red stripe and Havana brown leather interior.

The unconventional paint choice was among a number of requests submitted by its first keeper, French industrialist and accomplished racing driver Jacques Peron, when ordering the Ferrari from the factory.

The original owner ordered the Ferrari with a very specific specification that the factory failed to meet. Such was his anger that he quickly sold the motor the same year - and sent bosses a strongly worded letter expressing his disappointment

The original owner ordered the Ferrari with a very specific specification that the factory failed to meet. Such was his anger that he quickly sold the motor the same year – and sent bosses a strongly worded letter expressing his disappointment

He wanted the Italian stallion to race in the Tour de France event that year, with specific demands put to Maranello concerning the specification. Among the requests was for a 250 TR-specification engine, hinged engine cover to enable easy roadside repairs, transmission tunnel-mounted handbrake for standing starts on hill climbs and room for two spare wheels.

Yet Ferrari delivered the 250 GT without most of these requested features installed, much to Peron’s anger. In fact, soon after competing in the race – in which he finished a respectable fourth – he immediately sold the car, notifying bosses at the Italian marque via a strongly worded letter.

Having been through the ownership of a number of collectors, the car was bought in 1972 by married racing duo David and Mary Love and remained in the American family’s collection until David’s passing in 2014.

The last owner commissioned a full restoration, including a rebuild of the original 3.0-litre V12 engine and gearbox that produced 26bhp when new, and the car was presented at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in its back-to-factory best. Having only been driven ‘selectively’ since refurbished, the winning bid at last year’s auction was $6million.

9. 1955 Jaguar D-Type Roadster

Price paid: £4.4million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale, Scottsdale, USA (22 January 2021)

This 1955 example of the legendary D-Type Jaguar is one of just 71 examples produced. The D-Type famously won Le Mans in 1955, 1956 and 1957

This 1955 example of the legendary D-Type Jaguar is one of just 71 examples produced. The D-Type famously won Le Mans in 1955, 1956 and 1957

Widely recognised as one of Britain’s greatest endurance race cars of all time, a genuine Jaguar D-Type that goes under the hammer today is always going to demand a stellar sum.

This model – chassis number XKD 518 – is no different, changing hands just over a year ago at RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale at the OTTO Car Club for a figure of $6million.

This car – one of only 71 made – was delivered on 29 December 1955 to Henlys of Manchester and, like the Ferrari 250 GT above, was painted in an unfamiliar colour for the brand – one of a couple of examples believed to have left the Coventry assembly line finished red.

RM Sotheby’s says it was painted British Racing Green at some point in its lifetime but has since been returned to its factory scarlet tone.

This example - chassis XKD 518 - was owned by collectors in the UK until 1982 when it was shipped to the US. It sold at RM Sotheby's Arizona sale in January last year for $6million

This example – chassis XKD 518 – was owned by collectors in the UK until 1982 when it was shipped to the US. It sold at RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale in January last year for $6million

Racer Peter Blond became its first private owner in 1956, having purchased the car for £3,500 from F1 mogul Bernie Ecclestone, who had taken the car on after Henlys had – unfathomably – failed to find a buyer for it.

Blond soon put it to good use in club racing, winning a number of competitions during the summer of 1956.

The car continued to compete on the UK scene in the hands of other racing owners until it was shipped across the Atlantic in 1982, where it has remained under various ownership since.

When it went to the block in January 2021, it still had its original, numbers-matching, 3.4-litre dry-sump XK engine and triple Weber carburetors, breathing through passenger-side-mounted exhaust and mated to four-speed transmission that – when new – was claimed to put out 245 horsepower.

8. 2010 McLaren-Mercedes MP4-25 F1

Price paid: £4.7million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s British Grand Prix 2021 auction, Silverstone, UK (17 July 2021)

The first Lewis Hamilton Formula 1 race winning car to be made available at a public auction sold for a monumental £4.7million in July

The first Lewis Hamilton Formula 1 race winning car to be made available at a public auction sold for a monumental £4.7million in July

From iconic racers of the past to something a little more current.

This McLaren-Mercedes MP4-25 F1 machine was piloted by seven-time World Champion Lewis Hamilton to victory at the 2010 Turkish Grand Prix at the Istanbul Park, making it the first winning car driven by the Briton to be offered at a public sale.

What also makes this particular chassis extremely valuable in the eyes of collectors and F1 enthusiasts is the fact Hamilton drove it wheel-to-wheel in a battle with Michael Schumacher – the icon also with seven titles to his name.

This particular car is the first F1 machine driven to victory by the seven-time World Champion to be offered to bidders. Hamilton piloted the vehicle to first place in the 2010 Turkish Grand Prix (pictured)

This particular car is the first F1 machine driven to victory by the seven-time World Champion to be offered to bidders. Hamilton piloted the vehicle to first place in the 2010 Turkish Grand Prix (pictured)

En route to a second-place finish at the 2010 Chinese Grand Prix, Hamilton duelled with Schumacher from lap 15 and eventually passing the German some 11 laps after latching onto the German’s gearbox. Hamilton would go on to finish fourth that season, with Red Bull Racing’s Sebastian Vettel taking the driver’s championship.

The winning bid for the machine, placed during an exclusive event at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone last year, was a massive £4.7million.

It’s no show car or rolling chassis, either. McLaren Racing Heritage in 2019 set to work on making the machine track-ready, meaning the fortunate buyer could – in theory – take it on track today, if they dare to do so with such a high-value asset.

Produced four years before F1 entered the hybrid era, the engine is a naturally-aspirated 2.4-litre V8 with a seven-speed seamless gearbox that revved – when raced – to a monumental 18,000rpm.

7. 1955 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione

Price paid: £5.2million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s The Guikas Collection auction, Le Castellet, France (19 November 2021)

This Ferrari is one of the most travelled classic cars of its era, having been owned by keepers across Europe, America and Japan

This Ferrari is one of the most travelled classic cars of its era, having been owned by keepers across Europe, America and Japan

It’s without question that Ferrari is usually the dominant brand in lists like this, with half of the entries in 2021 rundown being Maranello built beauties.

This one is a 1955 Ferrari 250 GT. Only six prototype examples were developed as part of Ferrari’s process of phasing out production of the legendary 250 MM, each with a 3.0-litre V12 engine producing an estimated 230bhp. This limited-run model would, in effect, serve as a forerunner to the revered 250 GT Berlinetta TdF that would dominate the racing scene for the best part of a decade.

This particular car – chassis number 0385 GT – was originally silver and first owned by the president of the Automobile Club of Milan, a Mr Luigi Bertett, and had two further keepers in Italy before being shipped in January 1964 to a new owner in Athens, Greece.

Originally silver, the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione was painted Rosso Corsa red during its ownership in the UK in the 1990s. It was sold in November as part of a single collection of 75 desirable racing cars in the South of France

Originally silver, the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione was painted Rosso Corsa red during its ownership in the UK in the 1990s. It was sold in November as part of a single collection of 75 desirable racing cars in the South of France

It unfortunately was involved in a road accident in 1965 and was put into storage, where it stayed for 10 years untouched before it was returned to Italy under the ownership of American Stephen Barney who commissioned a full restoration in Modena.

Not long after the repairs were completed, Barney took the Ferrari back to North America. It returned to Europe in the 1980s and was added to a German collection alongside Ferrari 250 GTOs and other motoring treasures before being sold to an enthusiast in Japan.

Likely the most-travelled 250 GT Berlinetta Competitzione, it was shipped to the UK in the early 1990s – which is where the silver paint was changed to Rosso Corsa red and later a complete rebuild of its original engine took place – and then to France, where it ended up in the collection of Jean Guikas.

In November, it was offered alongside 74 other valuable racing cars from the Guikas estate at the Paul Ricard circuit in the South of France, where the winning bid was €6,192,500, making it the most expensive sale of the day.

=5. 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione

Price paid: £5.6million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale, California, USA (13 August 2021)

This is a Ferrari competition car with plenty of provenance - and rarity. It is one of just 12 produced by the Maranello factory in the sixties

This is a Ferrari competition car with plenty of provenance – and rarity. It is one of just 12 produced by the Maranello factory in the sixties

Another supremely rare Ferrari racing car to go under the hammer last year was this 1966 275 GTB, which is number 11 of 12 produced by the Maranello outfit.

It went on to compete on three occasions at the 24 Hours of Le Mans from 1967 to 1969 and was a class winner in its debut performance, as well as taking category victories at the 1969 1000KM of Spa-Francorchamps and 1969 500KM of Imola endurance races.

By the end of its racing career, the 275 was in 1970 shipped to California and passed between four more American owners before being acquired in 1979 by collector John Wallace.

Unfortunately, during his ownership, Wallace was forced to rebody the Ferrari after it had been subjected to a garage fire in Los Angeles in 1985, which saw the original wafer-thin aluminium bodywork melt away in many sections due to the extreme heat. However, importantly, the major mechanical components remained intact, including the chassis, transaxle and 3.3-litre V12 engine and five-speed manual transmission.

This car was unfortunately caught up in a storage fire in 1985, which destroyed much of the original bodywork. In 2015 it was upgraded to compete in classic racing events

This car was unfortunately caught up in a storage fire in 1985, which destroyed much of the original bodywork. In 2015 it was upgraded to compete in classic racing events

In 1985 it was bought by another Ferrari enthusiast based in Switzerland before being bought by an Italian collector, who embarked on a full restoration that included the fabrication of a new thin-gauge aluminium body.

In 1997, the Ferrari was shipped to Japan, then in 2006 to the UK and eventually returned to California in 2015, when it was treated to a comprehensive three-year restoration and rebuilt to be able to compete in vintage racing events, which saw the original engine and other components removed and put to one side as spares to make way for higher performance parts.

Following a number of competition entries and displays at concours events, the car went under the hammer in the summer during Monterey Car Week and attracted a winning bid of $7,705,000, which worked out at around £5.6million at the time of sale.

=5. 1962 Ferrari 268 SP

Price paid: £5.6million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale, California, USA (13 August 2021)

Stunner: This 1962 Ferrari 268 SP is one of just six produced by the factory in the early sixties and made appearances at many iconic endurance races during its heyday

Stunner: This 1962 Ferrari 268 SP is one of just six produced by the factory in the early sixties and made appearances at many iconic endurance races during its heyday

Sold during the same auction as the Ferrari above, this 1962 268 SP also achieved the exact same winning bid amount of $7,705,000.

However, unlike the 275 GTB, the 268 SP has the heritage stamp of being campaigned by the factory racing team at its peak.

Chassis number 0798 is one of just six examples of the 278 SP, which features a V8 engine and the shark-nosed bodywork designed by Fantuzzi, but is the only one that today remains in its original configuration.

This car is the third to be completed in the sixties and can be identified from the first two examples by the cut-down windscreen, which was modified as to meet new FIA regulations introduced in 1962.

Before last year's sale, it had been retained in just two collections for the 52 years. The winning bid at the RM Sotheby's US auction was a massive $7,705,000

Before last year’s sale, it had been retained in just two collections for the 52 years. The winning bid at the RM Sotheby’s US auction was a massive $7,705,000

While incredibly stunning, the 278 SP was far from a formidable machine when debuted. In fact, its best result came in the 12 Hours of Sebring race in the March of the year it was produced, crossing the finish line in 13th position. In order to make it more competitive, the engine displacement was increased from 2.4 to 2.6 litres to bump power to 265bhp ahead of an appearance at the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

It was also modified with a rear-cockpit airfoil enclosure to improve aerodynamic performance for the French circuit’s 3.1-mile Mulsanne straight, though the car was forced to retire early in the race due to clutch issues. Later that year it also had the twin-nostril grille added ahead of appearances in America.

When retired from the circuit the car was bought in 1969 by famed French Ferrari collector Pierre Bardinon of Aubusson, France, who had a host of the manufacturer’s legendary machines and was also a good friend of Enzo Ferrari. He kept it until 1996, and it was retained by one owner from then until last year’s Monterey auction.

4. 1972 Matra MS 670

Price paid: £6.05million

Sold at: Artcurial Retromobile 2021 auction, Paris, France (5 February 2021)

Back in February 2021, this 1972 Matra MS 670 sold for almost €7million (over £6million). The French racing car was co-driven by British two-time F1 champion Graham Hill to victory at the Le Mans 24 Hours endurance event, making it highly desirable

Back in February 2021, this 1972 Matra MS 670 sold for almost €7million (over £6million). The French racing car was co-driven by British two-time F1 champion Graham Hill to victory at the Le Mans 24 Hours endurance event, making it highly desirable

The highlight of last year’s Artcurial Motorcars Parisienne sale was this 1972 Matra MS 670, which was purchased with a winning bid of €6,907,200 – that worked out at around £6.05million.

What made it so valuable is the fact it won the 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race of the same year it was built, and in the hands of a pair of extremely renowned drivers.

The French racing car was piloted to victory by British two-time Formula One champion Graham Hill and Frenchman Henri Pescarolo, who won the Le Mans event four times in his 33 entries and also took the chequered flag at the 24 Hours of Daytona during his career.

Competing in the ‘Group 5 Prototype’ category, chassis number 001 is powered by a Matra MS73 3.0-litre V12 engine mated to a five-speed Porsche-derived manual transmission.

The car was raced for just two years and has spent most of its life on display at the French manufacturer's museum

The car was raced for just two years and has spent most of its life on display at the French manufacturer’s museum

After taking victory at the Circuit de la Sarthe in ’72, the car returned to the factory to be prepared for the 1973 season and competed in four rounds of the ‘World Championship of Makes’ that year, taking victory in the final outing at the 1000km race at Zeltweg on 24 June with Pescarolo and compatriot Gérard Larrousse at the wheel.

After being decommissioned from racing, the car was returned to the specification and colours of the Le Mans victory of 1972 and entered into the Matra museum in Romorantin in 1976 and remained in displays until 2020.

Artcurial said ahead of its sale: ‘With impeccable authenticity, today this machine has become a motor-racing legend.

‘Above and beyond the sum of its parts, it is a symbol of man and the machine in competition and a romantic adventure taken along a path which has witnessed passion, sweat, tears and joy, a path that leads to the finest victories.’

3. 1962 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Coupe

Price paid: £6.9million

Sold at: RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale, California, USA (12 August 2021)

Just 19 DB4 GT Zagatos were produced by Aston Martin, and one of them sold at a US auction last year for almost £7million

Just 19 DB4 GT Zagatos were produced by Aston Martin, and one of them sold at a US auction last year for almost £7million

The sixties saw a colossal on-track head-to-head between the Italian might of Ferrari and Britain’s powerhouse, Aston Martin.

When Aston Martin took first and second at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959, Ferrari made the decision to upgrade its aging 250 GT TdF with the SWB Berlinetta. Aston responded with the DB4GT, a competition version of their latest grand touring saloon, featuring a shortened wheelbase lightweight alloy bodywork, and a specially tuned high-compression 3.7-litre straight-six engine.

The Zagato followed as the ‘ultimate’ DB4 GT with improved performance and looks, of which just 19 were built – and this is one of them. The Zagato versions stand apart with a slightly elongated nose and more pronounced grille at the front, while at the rear the taillights are blended into the fenders and the C-pillar reduced with a larger backlight.

The first owner of this left-hand-drive example (number 18 or 19) was a Commander called James Murray, who was believed to have been a US Navy attaché who requested for it to have a unique ‘egg crate’ grille that he had designed himself.

The glorious sixties Aston Martin racing machine attracted a winning bid of $9.5m (approx £6.9m) in California last summer

The glorious sixties Aston Martin racing machine attracted a winning bid of $9.5m (approx £6.9m) in California last summer

This is also the only one of the 19 Zagatos to be fitted with chromed brass window frames, rather than the aluminium frames seen on other cars, and glass windows in the doors – different to the Perspex quarter-windows usually seen on this model. Chromed interior brass door handles were also specified by Commander Murray.

Incredibly, before being delivered to the commander in June 1962, the car was ‘tested’ by Aston Martin team driver Roy Salvadori at a race at Brands Hatch, finishing first in class and second overall behind—what else—a Ferrari 250 GTO.

The DB4 GT was shipped to Sweden under new ownership in 1964 and returned to the UK in 1972 where it was refinished by the first English owner in Aston Racing Green – a modification that was reversed between 1995 and 1997 during restoration under the keepership of its next driver before being transported back to the US in 1998.

While this specific car didn’t have a decorated racing heritage, RM Sotheby’s said it remains a ‘significant dual-purpose Aston Martin of its generation’ and ‘one of the greatest performance automobiles ever made’. It attracted a winning bid of $9,520,000 (approx £6.9million) in California last summer.

2. 1959 Ferrari 250 California LWB Spider

Price paid: £7.8million

Sold at: Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach 2021 auction, California, USA (14 August 2021)

This is one of just 10 Competitzione-spec 250 GT Californias in the long-wheelbase layout and has been mostly retained it original condition

We’ve cast our eyes over a number of staggering Ferraris in this list, but none have been more sought-after than this 1959 250 GT Long Wheelbase California Competitzione offered at the Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach auction last August.

An open-top version of the 250 GT TdF Berlinetta, the California was developed for the growing North American market, with 106 examples produced by the Italian marque between 1957 and 1962 – and just 50 were this original long-wheelbase, which have gone on to be more desirable than their shorter counterparts.

What makes this example – chassis 1,245 GT – is that it’s only one of 10 originally specced to competition standards, with covered headlights, velocity stacks and a cold-air box atop three Weber 36 DCL3 carburetors that improves the 3.0-litre V12 powerplant’s output to 253bhp.

Other ‘Competitzione’ features include a limited-slip differential, bigger long-range fuel tank and external fuel filler – all equipment it retains today, as well as its correct number stampings for the engine and gearbox.

An open-top version of the 250 GT TdF Berlinetta, the California was developed specifically for the growing North American market in the late fifties and early sixties

The history of this machine is incredibly well documented across an ownership cycle of 11 different keepers, beginning with Ottavio Randaccio, an amateur racer from Milan who used the Ferrari for national hill climb events – making this one of few California editions to compete in Europe.

The 250 GT remained in Italy for four decades, being shipped to the US in 1999 and last bought by an American keeper in 2004 ahead of last year’s sale.

In the hands of the previous keeper, it was treated to a restoration project including a fresh coating for its original tricolour livery.

Adding yet more heritage to this car is the fact it was one of only a few examples to have a hardtop, which was unrestored and contributed to the exclusivity and eventual winning bid of just over £7.8million.

1. 1995 McLaren F1

Price paid: £17.4million

Sold at: Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach 2021 auction, California, USA (14 August 2021)

Mighty McLaren: This 1995 example of the iconic F1 supercar became the most expensive motor from the 1990s - and the priciest modern-era vehicle - to sell at auction. It was also the priciest sum paid for a car at auction last year

Mighty McLaren: This 1995 example of the iconic F1 supercar became the most expensive motor from the 1990s – and the priciest modern-era vehicle – to sell at auction. It was also the priciest sum paid for a car at auction last year

The car received a rapturous applause from the sales room at Pebble Beach in California on Saturday 14 August when the hammer eventually dropped following a fraught bidding war between collectors

The car received a rapturous applause from the sales room at Pebble Beach in California on Saturday 14 August when the hammer eventually dropped following a fraught bidding war between collectors

By far the most expensive motor to sell at auction in 2021 was this wonderful McLaren F1, which was bought during Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach 2021 sale and set a new record to become the most expensive 1990s car to ever go under the hammer.

The 1995 version of the iconic British supercar – which had covered a mere 242 miles (390km) from new at the time of sale – secured a winning bid of $20,465,000 (£17.4million) at the California event, making it not only the priciest model from the 1990s to sell at auction and also the costliest modern-era vehicle to go to the block.

Described as an ‘Exceptional time capsule’ example of the McLaren F1 road car – of which just 64 road cars were made – and finished in a unique colour combination of Creighton Brown paint and a Light Tan and Brazilian Brown interior, it received a rapturous applause from the sales room at Pebble Beach in California when the hammer eventually dropped following a fraught bidding war between collectors.

The winning bid far exceeded the pre-sale estimate, which predicted a figure closer to $15million. ‘If there is a single car that best represents the past, present, and future of the automobile, it is the McLaren F1,’ says David Brynan, senior specialist at the auction house.

This example is now the most expensive motor from its decade, marginally outpricing a sister car – a 1994 F1 in LM Specification – which was sold by RM Sotheby’s also in Monterey for $19,805,000 in 2019. In terms of more expensive cars that have sold at auction, the next-youngest model is a whopping 28 years older than the McLaren – a 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 S NART Spider sold in 2013.

Despite having three owners from new, the car has covered a mere 242 miles (390km) in 26 years. That's an average annual mileage of nine miles for each year it has been in existence

Despite having three owners from new, the car has covered a mere 242 miles (390km) in 26 years. That’s an average annual mileage of nine miles for each year it has been in existence

The F1's BMW-developed V12 engine developed a then-staggering 627bhp. It had a claimed top speed of 231mph (372km/h), though with the removal of the rev-limiter could hit 242.96mph (391.01 km/h). In 1993, it obliterated the previous road-car top speed record and held the moniker for a staggering 12 years, when it was eventually dethroned by the Bugatti Veyron in 2005

The F1’s BMW-developed V12 engine developed a then-staggering 627bhp. It had a claimed top speed of 231mph (372km/h), though with the removal of the rev-limiter could hit 242.96mph (391.01 km/h). In 1993, it obliterated the previous road-car top speed record and held the moniker for a staggering 12 years, when it was eventually dethroned by the Bugatti Veyron in 2005

The driving force behind the F1’s astronomical sale price is undoubtedly the low mileage. With just 242 miles on the clock since 1995, it has averaged just 9.3 miles each year it has been in existence. That means the 6.1-litre V12 BMW-developed petrol engine – which produced 627bhp when new – has barely been run in.

It is chassis 029 and, according to factory records, was the 25th F1 built at McLaren’s workshop in Woking and the final example built in 1994, having been completed on 23 December and was delivered new in 1995 to a private Japanese collector who stored it in a static museum display for the next 17 years.

This was so the McLaren could be ‘admired for its technical and aesthetic achievements’, says Brynan. As a result, it was driven ‘sparingly’. In fact, most of the 242 miles it has accrued in total are believed to have been clocked during promotional filming at a test track near Tsukuba in Japan.

The F1 remained in the hands of its original owner until 2012, when it was sold to Shinji Takei of Tokyo. Just a year later, it was sold again to an American collector whose private garage philosophy is described as ‘the best of the best’. When it arrived in the US in April 2013, the odometer read 196 miles (316km) – meaning it has added just 46 miles in the following eight years.

The machine is particularly notable for its elegant metallic brown livery, which is a unique colour not shared with any other F1 and named after the commercial director for McLaren Cars, Creighton Brown. It was sold with its complementing matching four-piece luggage set, handbook folio, and tool roll were all trimmed in matching light tan leather. With F1s original costing around £540,000, this barely-used example has increased in value 38 times over.

> Read our full report on the 1995 McLaren F1 sale in August

FIVE OTHER NOTABLE AUCTION SALES IN 2021

While these cars didn’t sell for prices substantial enough to break into the top 10 of most expensive to go under the hammer, classic car insurer and value tracker, Hagerty, says they are all worthy mentions for standout auction lots of 2021:

Wrecked exotic: 1960 Jaguar XK150 S Drophead

Price paid: £90,000

Sold at: Bonhams MPH Auction, Bicester, Oxfordshire, UK (22 May 2021)

Would you have paid £90,000 for this? The classic Jaguar XK150 3.8 S Drophead Coupe sold at auction in May for nine times its lower estimate if £10,000 - though Bonhams says it could be worth £250,000 if fully restored

Would you have paid £90,000 for this? The classic Jaguar XK150 3.8 S Drophead Coupe sold at auction in May for nine times its lower estimate if £10,000 – though Bonhams says it could be worth £250,000 if fully restored

The Jaguar was crashed in 1996 when the car skidded off the road and into a tree in the rain in Hull, East Yorkshire. The extent of the shunt is still clearly visible today. Still, a winning bidder forked out £90k on the mangled motor

The Jaguar was crashed in 1996 when the car skidded off the road and into a tree in the rain in Hull, East Yorkshire. The extent of the shunt is still clearly visible today. Still, a winning bidder forked out £90k on the mangled motor

A mangled and twisted vintage Jaguar that was crashed by its last owner in 1996 and never repaired sold at auction for a staggering £90,000 back in May of last year.

The ultra-rare 1960 XK150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe has been off the road since it slammed into a tree in Hull some 25 years ago – but it didn’t stop one collector paying an astronomical fee for the banged-up motor, which was nine times the £10,000 pre-sale guide price for the car.

While that is undeniably a steep sum to pay for a vehicle is such a catastrophic state of disrepair, the selling auctioneer says it ‘looks worse than it is’ and – if fully restored – it could be worth up to £250,000.

The smashed-up Jag was sold at the Bonhams MPH Auction in Bicester, Oxfordshire, with the winning bid nine times higher than the pre-sale lower estimate of just £10,000.

> Read our full report on the wrecked 1960 Jaguar XK150 S Drophead

Most expensive rally car of all time: 1988 Audi Sport Quattro 

Price paid: £1.8million

Sold at: Artcurial Retromobile 2021 auction, Paris, France (5 February 2021)

This 1988 Audi Sport Quattro S1 was commissioned by the German manufacturer to compete in the Race of Champions, which took place two years after the end of the Group B rallying era in tribute to driver Henri Toivonen

This 1988 Audi Sport Quattro S1 was commissioned by the German manufacturer to compete in the Race of Champions, which took place two years after the end of the Group B rallying era in tribute to driver Henri Toivonen

The Audi is the last of the legendary Quattro rally cars to ever be produced and is in exceptional condition for a racing machine. It sold in February 2021 for almost £1.8million - a record highest fee paid for a rally car at auction

The Audi is the last of the legendary Quattro rally cars to ever be produced and is in exceptional condition for a racing machine. It sold in February 2021 for almost £1.8million – a record highest fee paid for a rally car at auction

This 1980s Audi has set a new record for a rally car going under the hammer in February.

The 1988 Audi Sport Quattro S1 rally icon sold for a staggering €2million – almost £1.8million – at the Artcurial Parisienne collectible car event, which was not only twice the sale figure predicted but also a world record fee paid for a rally car at auction.

The Audi was one of seven 1980s Group B racers from a single collection made available at the sale, which also included 1985 versions of the Peugeot 205 Turbo T16 and Renault 5 Maxi Turbo, which also sold for new record high amounts.

It was the final version of the Quattro rally car built, produced specially to take part in the Race of Champions event in 1988 – an event organised by rally driver Michèle Mouton, who herself took four victories in a Audi Quattro in 1981 and 1982. The race was arranged in tribute to the late Henri Toivonen, whose crash in 1986 at the Corsica rally brought an end to the Group B rally series over safety concerns.

> Read the full story about this Group B rally cars sold at the Artcurial event a year ago

One royal owner: 1981 Ford Escort 1.6 Ghia

Price paid: £52,640

Sold at: Reeman Dansie Auctioneers Royalty, Antiques & Fine Art Sale, Colchester, Essex, UK (29 June 2021)

A Ford Escort that was once owned by Diana, Princess of Wales, was sold at auction to a museum in South America for £52,640 last summer Pictured, the Princess during a visit to St Mary's school in Tetbury

A Ford Escort that was once owned by Diana, Princess of Wales, was sold at auction to a museum in South America for £52,640 last summer Pictured, the Princess during a visit to St Mary’s school in Tetbury

The Escort still carried its original registration WEV 297W. The car had been gifted by Prince Charles to Princess Diana as an engagement present

The Escort still carried its original registration WEV 297W. The car had been gifted by Prince Charles to Princess Diana as an engagement present

A Ford Escort that was once owned by Diana, Princess of Wales sold at auction in June to a museum in South America for a whopping £52,640.

Lady Diana Spencer was given the silver 1.6L Ghia saloon by the Prince of Wales as an engagement present in May 1981, two months before they were married in July 1981.

She often drove it to watch Charles play polo, and the bonnet features a silver frog – a copy of the original mascot which was given to the princess by her sister Sarah and which Diana kept when she sold the car.

The hammer price paid was more than ten times what the same model would be worth without a Royal connection, according to classic car valuations experts.

Hagerty, which tracks the values of older vehicles, said its guide suggests a Ford Escort Ghia of this age and mileage is currently worth just £4,700.

> Read the full report on the Princess Diana Ford Escort sale

Online achiever: 1989 Ferrari F40

Price paid: £1,000,500

Sold at: The Market, exclusively online (19 July 2021)

The record-breaking blue stallion: This 1989 Ferrari F40 sold for over £1million in July. It because the first car sold by a specialist online collectible auction platform to exceed a seven-figure sum

The record-breaking blue stallion: This 1989 Ferrari F40 sold for over £1million in July. It because the first car sold by a specialist online collectible auction platform to exceed a seven-figure sum

All 1,311 examples of the Ferrari F40 produced in Maranello between 1987 and 1992 came off the assembly line in Rosso Corsa Red
However, this is arguably the most famous - in the UK anyway - example in a different tone

All 1,311 examples of the Ferrari F40 produced in Maranello between 1987 and 1992 came off the assembly line in Rosso Corsa Red. However, this is arguably the most famous – in the UK anyway – example in a different tone

Ferrari F40s are super rare. But blue Ferrari F40s are like gold dust. That’s because – officially – all 1,311 to leave the Maranello factory between 1987 and 1992 were painted red.

However, this one-of-a-kind example is blue. And not just any shade of blue. It’s based on a Porsche colour, which is enough to make a Tifosi member scoff.

Despite lacking the originality usually demanded of such top cars, it made up for a lack of provenance with a famed online presence, generated by its owner Sam Moores, the Car Chat podcaster and photographer.

When the virtual hammer dropped at the end of online-only seller The Market’s seven-day sale last summer, the stand-out F40 achieved a sale price of £1,000,500. This made it the first seven-figure car to be sold on an online platform for collectible models in Europe.

> Read the This is Money report on its sale last year

Modern classic you have to build yourself: 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP500S

Price paid: £257,600

Sold at: Historics Auctioneers Ascot sale, Berkshire, UK (25 September 2021)

Complete it yourself Countach: This 1982 Lamborghini was sold at auction in September for well over its estimated value, despite the fact it was almost entirely in bits

Complete it yourself Countach: This 1982 Lamborghini was sold at auction in September for well over its estimated value, despite the fact it was almost entirely in bits

The 1982 Lamborghini Countach 5000 S was bought by the vendor in 2000 and was driven up until 2008

The 1982 Lamborghini Countach 5000 S was bought by the vendor in 2000 and was driven up until 2008

It appeared to be a basket case, a supercar in component parts and in urgent need of saving.

Yet this 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP 500S restoration case was sold by Historics in September for £257,600 – well over its top £180,000 estimate.

The LP500s (often called the 5000s) was the original Athena poster model.

This one, stripped down and ready for a full restoration, was an ultra-rare right-hand drive example, one of just 37 made.

Hagerty’s ‘Excellent’ value at the time was £334,000, not giving the new owner too much leeway for a full-cost restoration, but then again it’s rare for buyers in this part of the market, where money isn’t always a concern, to be presented with a blank canvas to restore to their own specification.

> Read our full pre-sale report on the car with all the images of its stripped-down condition

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My husband and I are looking to move home this year as we have outgrown the property we are in.

We started looking last year and even made an offer, but we lost out because our own property wasn’t yet on the market.

We learnt our lesson and put our home up for sale. Having accepted an offer on our current flat, we eventually found our dream new home.

Unfortunately our buyer subsequently pulled out, and we were once again left feeling deflated as the home we had our hearts set on was then sold to someone else.

We don’t want to continue with this endless cycle of disappointment, and would like some advice on what to do. 

Is it worth selling up first and renting somewhere temporarily, so we are more attractive as buyers? Are there any potential pitfalls when doing so? (Via email)

In many areas, the number of properties for sale simply isn’t keeping up with the number of would-be buyers, meaning many lose out and are left feeling disappointed.

In many areas, the number of properties for sale simply isn’t keeping up with the number of would-be buyers, meaning many lose out and are left feeling disappointed.

Ed Magnus of This is Money: Moving home is a stressful business at the best of times. It almost always requires upheaval, time-sapping admin and a degree of uncertainty.

When searching for your perfect property, it can feel like your life is being put on hold, with future plans thrown into disarray as you don’t know where you will be living a few months down the line. 

What’s more, the whole process of moving home can take a considerable amount of time, which often takes those who haven’t moved for some time by surprise.

The average time it takes to sell a property from the first day of marketing to legal completion is currently 166 days, according to Rightmove – that’s almost 24 weeks.

It typically takes 39 days for a property to go from being ‘for sale’ to finding a buyer, and then a further 127 days on average to go through the surveying, mortgage approval and legal processes and complete.

That might be enough in itself to put some people off moving home. Add that to a potentially long property chain of equally anxious buyers and sellers, and there is also a good chance of deals collapsing, just like our reader has experienced.

Many property transactions are dependent on a chain of buyers and sellers, all relying on each other to ensure they can complete on their own purchase.

If any transaction in the chain is delayed or collapses, everyone in the chain is impacted.

According to Rightmove 27 per cent of property transactions fell through last month. 

Should our reader sell before they buy? 

Even if your property is for sale, sellers and their estate agents are unlikely to take your offer seriously if you don’t have a buyer for it.

Accepting an offer on your own property first will put you in a much stronger position. 

However, if you want to go one step further, you might prefer to sell up before making an offer on a new home.

This will probably make you a more attractive buyer in the eyes of a seller as you will be chain-free, and this could also put you in a stronger bargaining position.

The seller will deem you to be a less risky buyer than someone reliant on selling their own property, and that may well be worth something.

According to Rightmove 27 per cent of properties transactions fell through last month.

According to Rightmove 27 per cent of properties transactions fell through last month.

But there is an obvious drawback, in that selling before you have made an offer will require you to find a stop-gap home, perhaps staying with friends or relatives who are willing to help out.

If that is not possible, you will have to find somewhere to rent for between three to 12 months. 

It is a good idea in theory, but many find the cost and inconvenience is too much to bear.

There is also your mortgage to consider. If you are hoping to move or ‘port’ your existing mortgage to your new home, renting temporarily may not be the best tactic.

Most lenders only allow for a two-to-three-month period between selling and buying a property, in which you can bring your mortgage ‘back to life’ without incurring an early repayment charge.

Most fixed-rate deals come with early repayment charges, which often range between one and five per cent of the outstanding mortgage amount.

Finally you also have to accept the risk of the market moving against you in between your sale and your purchase.

After a year in which property prices rose by 10 per cent or around £25,000 according to some indexes, even a six month delay could prove costly. 

If house prices went up in that time, the money you had from the sale of your home might get you less when you came to make your onward purchase. 

There is also a chance that property prices could fall, meaning the delay could pay off, but a dramatic drop is unlikely. 

We asked Jonathan Hopper, chief executive of the buying agency Garrington Property Finders, and Lucy Pendleton, property expert at estate agent James Pendleton, for their advice.  

While Hopper said selling up would likely be worth it, Pendleton was less encouraging. We have outlined both their views below.  

‘It’s a booming market – they should sell up’  

Jonathan Hopper replies: Buying a home in a booming property market invariably brings with it a mixture of hope, hard work and heartbreak.

For every successful buyer, there may be several who miss out. If this is you, and you keep losing out to other buyers, it’s worth stepping back and taking steps to improve your chances.

The secret here is to make yourself as ‘proceedable’ as possible. This is estate agent code for making yourself a more attractive buyer.

 The secret here is to make yourself as ‘proceedable’ as possible. This is estate agent code for making yourself a more attractive buyer

Jonathan Hopper, buying agent 

Sellers, and the estate agents who work for them, grade buyers according to how proceedable they are. 

They will look at how far advanced your own sale is, as well as the size of your offer. 

If you’re buying with a mortgage, you need to have a loan approved in principle as an absolute minimum. 

Showing that you’re ready to move quickly – for example by appointing a conveyancing solicitor – also helps.

But you can jump to the top of the proceedability pack by selling your own property in advance. 

This will make you ‘chain free’, making your offer much more likely to win out over those of other buyers who need to sell their home before they can move. 

House prices increased by over £24,500 in 2021,  the largest annual rise since March 2003

House prices increased by over £24,500 in 2021,  the largest annual rise since March 2003

To decide whether it’s right for you, you need to weigh up your individual circumstances carefully and seek expert advice.

If you’re moving from a less sought-after area to a very popular one, your home could take longer to sell than the homes you’re interested in buying. 

In this case, it may make sense to get your ducks in a row early, selling before you start offering in earnest.

Also, in the current market, houses are generally being snapped up faster than flats.

So, if you’re moving from a flat to a house, you may want to get your flat sold now so you’re primed and ready to strike when you see a house you really want.

Conversely if you were downsizing from a house to a flat, the hassle of moving twice might outweigh the benefits.

Another factor to consider is the cost involved. Depending on what sort of rental property you choose, renting for six months may cost more than six months of your current mortgage payments.

But spending more now to give yourself an edge over other buyers could save you money in the long run.

With the average home rising in value by over £2,000 a month in 2021, according to the Halifax, taking the plunge and moving into rented accommodation could pay off. 

It might help you buy somewhere more quickly and spares you from more frustrating months of property snakes and ladders – although there are no guarantees. 

When prices are rising so fast, allowing your purchase to drag on unnecessarily will cost you money. And in such a competitive market, it’s worth thinking outside the box to give yourself a competitive advantage.

Being bold and selling now might cost you several months of rent. But it could save you much more money on your purchase, not to mention the heartache of losing out again and again to more committed buyers.

‘It might not pay off – sit tight’  

Lucy Pendleton replies:  It’s too late in your case, but when a buyer pulls out, a good agent can often convince a vendor to delay remarketing their property for a few weeks to give their buyer the chance to find a new one. 

That comes down to the skill of the agent, who must be able to demonstrate to the other side that you easily attracted a buyer before and can do so quickly again.

My advice is that you sit tight and wait for the volume of properties coming to market to improve later this year. It’s less risky and you will hopefully be presented with more choice and less competition.

 There are times when stepping off the housing ladder and breaking a chain is recommended, but personally I don’t think this is one of them

Lucy Pendleton, estate agent 

There are times when stepping off the housing ladder and breaking a chain is recommended, but personally I don’t think this is one of them.

The market can move on quickly without you, and you can suddenly find your budget shrinking as prices rise.

That may be less of a risk this year after valuations rose so strongly in 2021, but it’s still a possibility.

You’ve also got the rental market to worry about. This has been running exceptionally hot as well and should give anyone contemplating an early sale pause for thought.

The lettings market is fiercely competitive and that means that, not only are rents relatively expensive due to high demand, but landlords are also reluctant to take on shorter tenancies of the kind you’d be looking for.

Landlords prefer contracts of at least 12 months, so if someone comes along offering to sign up for longer than you’re willing to, you will lose out on that temporary home just as easily as you did in the sales market. 

That would clearly be incredibly frustrating.   

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The average home seller who bought within the last 20 years sold their property for £95,360 more than they paid for it, new research has revealed.

The amount is an increase of £11,810 on 2020 when the average seller sold for a £83,500 gain.

A record 92 per cent of sellers in England and Wales sold their property last year for more than they bought it, having owned it for an average of 8.8 years, the annual research by estate agent Hamptons revealed.

The average seller made a gain of £95,360 in 2021, an increase of £11,810 on 2020, according to new research by Hamptons

The average seller made a gain of £95,360 in 2021, an increase of £11,810 on 2020, according to new research by Hamptons

AVERAGE SELLER GROSS PROFIT ACROSS ENGLAND AND WALES
Seller Gain
£
Seller Gain
%
Average years
of ownership
% of sellers
who made a gain
2015 £82,730 59% 8.8 86%
2016 £87,560 60% 8.8 89%
2017 £88,230 58% 8.8 90%
2018 £85,200 54% 8.9 90%
2019 £79,100 48% 8.9 89%
2020 £83,550 44% 8.8 90%
2021 £95,360 46% 8.8 92%
Source: Hamptons & Land Registry     

It follows Britain experiencing a red hot property market last year, during which average values increased by £24,500, according to Halifax.

The Hamptons research found a clear divide among the different types of property sold.

Those selling a detached house saw an average gross gain of £151,840 while those selling a flat saw their gains drop to £54,690 in 2021.

Flats have fallen out of favour during the pandemic as buyers seek more space due to several lockdowns. They have also been plagued with issues such as cladding repair bills and toxic ground rent clauses.

Flats also tend to be owned for a shorter time than detached homes, which are held for longer and accrue more gains.

One in five flat sellers last year made a loss on their property compared to 4 per cent of detached house sellers.

The research revealed that flat owners were the only sellers to see their gains fall between 2020 and 2021

The research revealed that flat owners were the only sellers to see their gains fall between 2020 and 2021

SELLER GROSS PROFIT ACROSS ENGLAND AND WALES BY PROPERTY TYPE
2019 2020 2021
Flat £57,500 £62,360 £54,690
Terraced £66,250 £70,550 £79,370
Semi-Detached £76,820 £81,330 £92,430
Detached £122,280 £132,240 £151,840
Source: Hamptons & Land Registry     

London sellers continued to make the biggest gains. But weaker price growth meant that 2021 marked the first time since Hamptons records began – in 2015 – that sellers in the capital made a gross gain of less than £200,000.

Hamptons suggests that people’s reassessment of their homes since the pandemic began has also led to sellers to move sooner.

It said that 64 per cent of sellers in 2021 sold their home within 10 years, compared to 59 per cent of sellers in 2019.

Aneisha Beveridge, of Hamptons said: ‘Soaring house price growth over the last 18 months has driven up the amount of money homeowners have made.

‘But while owners of larger properties have benefitted from buyers looking for more space, flat owners have seen weaker returns.

‘House price gains are primarily driven by two factors – the length of time people have owned their home and the point at which they bought in the housing cycle.

Most of these profits are never seen by sellers as they are reinvested back into the housing market when they make their next purchase

‘Typically, homeowners who have owned their properties for longer have seen more price growth and therefore made bigger profits.’

However, she added: ‘Although, most of these profits are never seen by sellers as they are reinvested back into the housing market when they make their next purchase.

‘House price gains last year may have been close to their peak. 2021’s average seller bought in 2012, and house prices across England and Wales have risen by 55 per cent since then.

‘However, 2022-2024 sellers are likely to have bought more recently, during a period of weaker price growth. We’ve already seen this in London, where seller gains have been falling since 2016.’

A record 92% per cent of sellers sold their property last year for more than they bought it

A record 92% per cent of sellers sold their property last year for more than they bought it

Hamptons said the rise in seller profit has been boosted by the sale of bigger homes. These have typically been owned for longer and benefitted from more price growth.

Owners of detached houses accounted for 23 per cent of sellers – and 37 per cent of profit – in England and Wales last year, up from 20 per cent in 2019.

And sellers of detached houses made the biggest gains at £151,840 or 53 per cent, having owned them the longest, typically 9.4 years.

The average gross profit on a detached home jumped from £132,240 in 2020 and £122,280 pre-pandemic in 2019.

Hamptons also said that flat owners are least likely to sell their home for more than they bought it for, partly because they tend to own for a shorter period at 8.2 years in 2021.

One in five – at 19 per cent – of flat sellers in 2021 made a loss on their property compared to 4 per cent of detached sellers.

Flat owners were the only sellers to see their gains fall between 2020 and 2021.

The average flat seller who sold in 2021 made a gross gain of £54,690 or 29 per cent, down from £62,360 in 2020.

Meanwhile, the average gain on a terrace property rose to £79,370, up £8,820, in 2021 and semi-detached sellers made £92,430, up £11,100 on average.  

HOW LONG SELLERS IN ENGLAND AND WALES OWNED THEIR HOME
2019 Seller 2020 Seller 2021 Seller
2.3% 1.7% 1.2%
1 4.1% 3.8% 3.1%
2 6.1% 6.0% 5.7%
3 7.6% 7.8% 7.7%
4 8.4% 8.8% 9.1%
5 8.0% 8.7% 9.1%
6 6.3% 7.7% 7.9%
7 4.8% 6.0% 7.3%
8 4.3% 4.4% 5.1%
9 3.9% 3.9% 4.1%
10 3.3% 3.6% 3.6%
11 3.7% 3.2% 3.5%
12 6.6% 3.1% 2.6%
13 6.2% 5.6% 3.5%
14 4.5% 5.5% 5.7%
15 4.3% 4.0% 5.0%
16 3.9% 3.8% 3.5%
17 3.6% 3.6% 3.8%
18 3.0% 3.3% 3.2%
19 2.5% 2.9% 3.2%
20 2.2% 2.2% 2.2%
21 0.3% 0.4% 0.1%
Source: Hamptons & Land Registry 

London sellers continued to make the biggest absolute gross profit. However, weaker house price growth over the last six years has meant that 2021 marked the first time since 2015 – when records began – that the average London seller made a gain of less than £200,000.

The average London seller sold their property in 2021 for £197,730 more than they paid for it an average of 9.1 years ago. It is down from £207,370 in 2020 and a peak of £243,050 in 2016.

While 91 per cent of London sellers made a gain on their property, 16 per cent of flat sellers in the capital sold at a loss, 54 per cent of whom bought in the capital during the last seven years.

Sellers in the North East were least likely to make a profit last year, according to Hamptons.

The average seller in the region made an average gross gain of £28,960, 22 per cent of whom sold their home for less than they bought it – on average 7.9 years ago.

Sellers in London’s most affordable borough, Barking and Dagenham, have seen the biggest percentage gain anywhere in the country.

The average 2021 seller in Barking and Dagenham sold their home for 76 per cent more than they paid for it.

It is followed by sellers in Waltham Forest at 72 per cent, Merthyr Tydfil in Wales at 71 per cent and Havering at 66 per cent.

Twelve of the local authorities where sellers banked the biggest percentage gains in 2021 were located in the capital.

AVERAGE SELLER GAIN BY LENGTH OF OWNERSHIP
Years owned 2015 sellers 2018 sellers 2021 sellers
16% 12% 19%
1 28% 26% 28%
2 25% 19% 21%
3 26% 22% 18%
4 27% 28% 19%
5 26% 37% 23%
6 30% 41% 31%
7 17% 42% 40%
8 13% 40% 51%
9 21% 45% 55%
10 27% 28% 55%
11 35% 24% 54%
12 55% 33% 61%
13 87% 41% 38%
14 122% 51% 39%
15 148% 75% 50%
16 183% 113% 58%
17 206% 153% 72%
18 230% 182% 100%
19 252% 219% 141%
20 252% 242% 180%
21 259% 254% 210%
Source: Hamptons & Land Registry 

The pandemic sparked a wave of early upsizers as people searched for more living and working space.

Some 64 per cent of sellers in 2021 sold their home within 10 years, compared to 59 per cent of sellers in 2019.

However, the proportion of sellers moving within between 11 and 14 years has fallen from 21 per cent in 2019 to 15 per cent in 2021.

Flat owners, in particular, have upsized sooner, with 65 per cent of 2021 flat sellers having moved within 10 years, up from 63 per cent of sellers in 2019.

Typically, the longer someone has owned a property, the bigger their gain.

The average 2021 seller who bought 20 years ago saw their property rise in value by 180 per cent, compared to 23 per cent for someone who bought five years ago.

They’re also less likely to make a loss, with less than 1 per cent of sellers who bought 20 years ago making a loss on the sale of their home in 2021 versus 9 per cent of buyers who bought five years ago.

While homeowners who have sold within five years of buying have made similar returns, seller gains have shrunk for those who have owned for a longer period of time.

For example, the average seller who owned for 15 years and sold in 2015 made an average gain of 148 per cent. However, a 2021 seller who bought 15 years ago made a 50 per cent gross gain. This is because house price growth across England and Wales has generally been weaker in recent years.

One in five flat sellers made a loss in 2021 compared to 4 per cent of those selling a detached home

One in five flat sellers made a loss in 2021 compared to 4 per cent of those selling a detached home

It follows a year that saw house price growth reach new records. They saw their biggest annual rise since the financial crisis last year.

The average price of a property increased by 9.8 per cent in 2021 to a new record high of £276,091, the largest percentage increase since 2007, data from Halifax shows.

In cash terms, prices increased by £24,500 in the year to December, which is the largest annual cash rise since 2003, the mortgage lender said.

However, a ‘considerable’ slowdown may be looming due to a big squeeze on household finances and possible further interest rate hikes. 

Russell Galley, of Halifax, said: ‘Looking ahead, the prospect that interest rates may rise further this year to tackle rising inflation and increasing pressures on household budgets suggest house price growth will slow considerably.’

‘Our expectation is that house prices will maintain their current strong levels, but that growth relative to the last two years will be at a slower pace.’

AVERAGE PROFITS AMONG HOMESELLERS IN EACH LOCAL AUTHORITY
Local Authority Region Average Profit % Average Profit £
BARKING AND DAGENHAM London 76% £123,526
WALTHAM FOREST London 72% £184,278
MERTHYR TYDFIL Wales 71% £54,357
HAVERING London 66% £151,371
CITY OF WESTMINSTER London 65% £411,415
BEXLEY London 65% £143,850
THANET South East England 65% £112,372
REDBRIDGE London 64% £171,215
SLOUGH South East England 63% £125,795
TRAFFORD North West England 63% £131,953
THURROCK East of England 63% £110,101
LEICESTER East Midlands 63% £75,810
HARINGEY London 63% £218,095
SOUTHWARK London 62% £213,312
HARROW London 62% £184,312
ENFIELD London 62% £162,206
GREENWICH London 62% £153,950
THREE RIVERS East of England 62% £194,920
HERTSMERE East of England 62% £212,430
HILLINGDON London 60% £158,161
CANTERBURY South East England 60% £126,011
HASTINGS South East England 60% £97,941
SUTTON London 60% £148,638
HACKNEY London 59% £196,880
MERTON London 59% £232,139
ADUR South East England 59% £127,745
GRAVESHAM South East England 59% £111,571
OADBY AND WIGSTON East Midlands 59% £88,747
ROCHFORD East of England 59% £134,439
KENSINGTON AND CHELSEA London 58% £572,116
LEWISHAM London 58% £155,407
CITY OF BRISTOL South West England 58% £118,008
ST ALBANS East of England 58% £219,882
RHONDDA CYNON TAFF Wales 58% £45,630
SOUTHEND-ON-SEA East of England 58% £121,132
BRENTWOOD East of England 58% £193,409
CASTLE POINT East of England 58% £116,116
BARNET London 57% £214,158
EALING London 57% £198,091
BRENT London 57% £185,993
MALDON East of England 57% £124,564
DOVER South East England 57% £105,626
SALFORD North West England 57% £66,830
LUTON East of England 57% £88,316
BROMLEY London 56% £168,120
FOLKESTONE AND HYTHE South East England 56% £107,162
BRIGHTON AND HOVE South East England 56% £150,436
MANCHESTER North West England 56% £71,465
WATFORD East of England 56% £129,655
CAMBRIDGE East of England 56% £168,540
RICHMOND UPON THAMES London 56% £284,612
BURY North West England 56% £70,937
BLAENAU GWENT Wales 56% £37,787
BROXBOURNE East of England 56% £131,644
ROTHER South East England 56% £127,544
MEDWAY South East England 56% £92,091
NORTH NORFOLK East of England 56% £111,899
CAMDEN London 55% £336,028
OXFORD South East England 55% £181,434
OLDHAM North West England 55% £54,432
CRAWLEY South East England 55% £95,544
ISLE OF ANGLESEY Wales 55% £73,132
CROYDON London 55% £135,245
EPSOM AND EWELL South East England 55% £164,357
EPPING FOREST East of England 55% £184,958
SPELTHORNE South East England 54% £144,806
NEWHAM London 54% £110,306
BASILDON East of England 54% £115,158
TAMESIDE North West England 54% £55,788
STOCKPORT North West England 54% £95,227
KING’S LYNN AND WEST NORFOLK East of England 54% £89,130
STEVENAGE East of England 53% £99,579
ASHFORD South East England 53% £103,621
SEVENOAKS South East England 53% £166,642
KINGSTON UPON THAMES London 53% £188,766
HARLOW East of England 53% £94,975
HAMMERSMITH AND FULHAM London 53% £288,964
HOUNSLOW London 53% £162,585
BROXTOWE East Midlands 53% £76,815
ROSSENDALE North West England 53% £56,514
DACORUM East of England 52% £156,981
NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE East of England 52% £131,520
MOLE VALLEY South East England 52% £187,659
EAST CAMBRIDGESHIRE East of England 52% £100,469
WELWYN HATFIELD East of England 51% £121,125
ROCHDALE North West England 51% £51,865
CAERPHILLY Wales 51% £50,472
WORTHING South East England 51% £105,110
WELLINGBOROUGH East Midlands 51% £63,923
LEWES South East England 51% £122,385
COVENTRY West Midlands 51% £64,682
NEATH PORT TALBOT Wales 51% £42,474
WEST SUFFOLK East of England 51% £90,077
ELMBRIDGE South East England 51% £258,838
LAMBETH London 51% £181,822
CHELMSFORD East of England 51% £125,644
SWALE South East England 50% £90,726
NORTH SOMERSET South West England 50% £103,348
CITY OF NOTTINGHAM East Midlands 50% £57,363
CITY OF LONDON London 50% £216,157
EREWASH East Midlands 50% £64,227
BIRMINGHAM West Midlands 50% £73,021
GEDLING East Midlands 50% £76,557
SOUTH CAMBRIDGESHIRE East of England 50% £126,302
BROMSGROVE West Midlands 49% £105,676
EAST HERTFORDSHIRE East of England 49% £141,821
SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE South West England 49% £95,006
TENDRING East of England 49% £82,397
MONMOUTHSHIRE Wales 49% £93,274
BRAINTREE East of England 49% £97,337
RUTLAND East Midlands 49% £99,415
EAST LINDSEY East Midlands 49% £59,409
ISLINGTON London 49% £215,510
THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN Wales 49% £84,359
NEW FOREST South East England 49% £136,581
WANDSWORTH London 48% £217,357
TUNBRIDGE WELLS South East England 48% £142,942
LIVERPOOL North West England 48% £46,575
BATH AND NORTH EAST SOMERSET South West England 48% £133,776
FOREST OF DEAN South West England 48% £89,428
EAST NORTHAMPTONSHIRE East Midlands 48% £82,495
CEREDIGION Wales 48% £60,111
TANDRIDGE South East England 48% £152,466
GWYNEDD Wales 48% £58,017
BROADLAND East of England 48% £89,530
STROUD South West England 48% £106,310
GUILDFORD South East England 48% £170,444
BLABY East Midlands 48% £74,843
REIGATE AND BANSTEAD South East England 48% £155,009
RUSHCLIFFE East Midlands 48% £106,797
CORNWALL South West England 48% £91,408
WEALDEN South East England 48% £127,835
SOUTH LAKELAND North West England 48% £89,493
EAST SUFFOLK East of England 48% £87,530
BOLSOVER East Midlands 47% £45,901
NORTHAMPTON East Midlands 47% £72,794
PEMBROKESHIRE Wales 47% £61,067
BABERGH East of England 47% £100,615
CHICHESTER South East England 47% £146,452
FENLAND East of England 47% £64,939
NORTH NORTHAMPTONSHIRE East Midlands 47% £71,895
HINCKLEY AND BOSWORTH East Midlands 47% £73,848
POWYS Wales 47% £62,545
MILTON KEYNES South East England 47% £83,953
BOLTON North West England 47% £49,721
WAVERLEY South East England 46% £173,315
NORTH WARWICKSHIRE West Midlands 46% £68,276
TOWER HAMLETS London 46% £136,161
NEWPORT Wales 46% £60,429
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE #N/A 46% £150,934
DERBYSHIRE DALES East Midlands 46% £91,774
MAIDSTONE South East England 46% £102,500
MANSFIELD East Midlands 46% £45,588
WOLVERHAMPTON West Midlands 46% £54,395
SHEFFIELD Yorkshire and the Humber 46% £65,160
GREAT YARMOUTH East of England 46% £61,770
TONBRIDGE AND MALLING South East England 46% £121,660
CENTRAL BEDFORDSHIRE East of England 46% £97,838
CHESTERFIELD East Midlands 46% £51,580
ASHFIELD East Midlands 46% £51,621
CONWY Wales 46% £58,747
HAVANT South East England 46% £96,803
CARMARTHENSHIRE Wales 46% £48,976
RUNNYMEDE South East England 46% £148,506
DARTFORD South East England 46% £94,257
SANDWELL West Midlands 46% £49,754
TORFAEN Wales 46% £49,585
LICHFIELD West Midlands 45% £76,266
WINDSOR AND MAIDENHEAD South East England 45% £172,303
SOLIHULL West Midlands 45% £106,236
DUDLEY West Midlands 45% £61,795
CHARNWOOD East Midlands 45% £77,606
WALSALL West Midlands 45% £61,143
HIGH PEAK East Midlands 45% £72,610
BRECKLAND East of England 45% £76,907
ARUN South East England 45% £109,738
MENDIP South West England 45% £98,047
SOUTH HOLLAND East Midlands 45% £64,837
NORWICH East of England 45% £73,317
HARBOROUGH East Midlands 45% £100,868
WINCHESTER South East England 45% £142,828
WEST LINDSEY East Midlands 45% £60,382
MALVERN HILLS West Midlands 45% £100,987
DENBIGHSHIRE Wales 45% £53,241
HUNTINGDONSHIRE East of England 44% £87,028
SOUTH NORFOLK East of England 44% £87,827
SOUTH HAMS South West England 44% £120,690
FAREHAM South East England 44% £99,363
BRIDGEND Wales 44% £50,495
SWANSEA Wales 44% £53,338
STAFFORDSHIRE MOORLANDS West Midlands 44% £62,443
WIRRAL North West England 44% £61,000
YORK Yorkshire and the Humber 44% £86,200
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE West Midlands 44% £54,793
CHELTENHAM South West England 44% £107,121
MID SUFFOLK East of England 44% £89,496
RUGBY West Midlands 44% £75,623
PORTSMOUTH South East England 43% £71,994
MELTON East Midlands 43% £82,327
AMBER VALLEY East Midlands 43% £62,979
NORTH EAST DERBYSHIRE East Midlands 43% £63,676
ISLE OF WIGHT South East England 43% £83,346
WOKING South East England 43% £140,051
IPSWICH East of England 43% £63,510
CITY OF PETERBOROUGH East of England 43% £61,530
EASTBOURNE South East England 43% £85,156
NORTH LINCOLNSHIRE Yorkshire and the Humber 43% £46,951
NORTH KESTEVEN East Midlands 43% £65,914
CORBY East Midlands 43% £55,638
EXETER South West England 43% £86,394
SOUTH KESTEVEN East Midlands 43% £75,008
HART South East England 43% £133,740
SURREY HEATH South East England 43% £136,706
WEST NORTHAMPTONSHIRE East Midlands 43% £78,544
EAST HAMPSHIRE South East England 43% £128,849
CRAVEN Yorkshire and the Humber 43% £62,756
TAMWORTH West Midlands 43% £58,486
MID SUSSEX South East England 43% £116,629
HORSHAM South East England 42% £120,004
WARRINGTON North West England 42% £69,707
RUSHMOOR South East England 42% £89,048
SOUTH OXFORDSHIRE South East England 42% £153,177
COLCHESTER East of England 42% £86,034
PENDLE North West England 42% £35,489
UTTLESFORD East of England 42% £126,701
BEDFORD East of England 42% £90,487
REDDITCH West Midlands 42% £68,075
SEDGEMOOR South West England 42% £73,772
CARDIFF Wales 42% £70,268
SEFTON North West England 42% £59,173
LEEDS Yorkshire and the Humber 42% £65,030
READING South East England 42% £96,796
BARROW-IN-FURNESS North West England 42% £37,471
LINCOLN East Midlands 42% £49,836
NORTH DEVON South West England 42% £83,290
RYEDALE Yorkshire and the Humber 41% £83,386
BOURNEMOUTH, CHRISTCHURCH AND POOLE South West England 41% £109,852
WEST BERKSHIRE South East England 41% £117,371
BASSETLAW East Midlands 41% £52,094
TEIGNBRIDGE South West England 41% £85,097
WOKINGHAM South East England 41% £122,515
GOSPORT South East England 41% £66,183
WEST LANCASHIRE North West England 41% £62,736
NEWARK AND SHERWOOD East Midlands 41% £67,190
WIGAN North West England 41% £40,854
WYRE FOREST West Midlands 41% £65,176
CANNOCK CHASE West Midlands 41% £52,534
CALDERDALE Yorkshire and the Humber 41% £45,174
WARWICK West Midlands 41% £95,970
COTSWOLD South West England 41% £120,403
BRACKNELL FOREST South East England 40% £107,943
SOUTH NORTHAMPTONSHIRE East Midlands 40% £95,433
NUNEATON AND BEDWORTH West Midlands 40% £52,427
DORSET South West England 40% £99,867
NORTH WEST LEICESTERSHIRE East Midlands 40% £61,203
KIRKLEES Yorkshire and the Humber 40% £48,320
STOKE-ON-TRENT West Midlands 40% £33,129
SCARBOROUGH Yorkshire and the Humber 40% £52,011
GLOUCESTER South West England 40% £59,267
DONCASTER Yorkshire and the Humber 39% £39,449
TORRIDGE South West England 39% £75,889
EAST DEVON South West England 39% £93,603
SOUTH SOMERSET South West England 39% £73,816
HARROGATE Yorkshire and the Humber 39% £99,406
CITY OF KINGSTON UPON HULL Yorkshire and the Humber 39% £26,628
CHESHIRE EAST North West England 39% £81,563
WILTSHIRE South West England 39% £82,554
HEREFORDSHIRE West Midlands 39% £78,079
WYCHAVON West Midlands 39% £87,767
BURNLEY North West England 39% £24,293
TORBAY South West England 39% £68,773
CHESHIRE WEST AND CHESTER North West England 39% £70,218
KNOWSLEY North West England 39% £37,390
ROTHERHAM Yorkshire and the Humber 38% £43,436
TEWKESBURY South West England 38% £83,593
CITY OF DERBY East Midlands 38% £49,254
NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME West Midlands 38% £46,329
FLINTSHIRE Wales 38% £44,878
SHROPSHIRE West Midlands 38% £71,060
BLACKBURN WITH DARWEN North West England 38% £24,027
BRADFORD Yorkshire and the Humber 38% £40,515
EASTLEIGH South East England 38% £87,402
TEST VALLEY South East England 38% £99,916
EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE Yorkshire and the Humber 38% £54,887
BARNSLEY Yorkshire and the Humber 38% £37,706
BASINGSTOKE AND DEANE South East England 38% £95,043
BOSTON East Midlands 37% £47,439
KETTERING East Midlands 37% £64,673
MID DEVON South West England 37% £73,762
ST HELENS North West England 37% £38,916
WREXHAM Wales 37% £46,844
NORTH EAST LINCOLNSHIRE Yorkshire and the Humber 37% £34,399
WEST DEVON South West England 37% £79,572
STRATFORD-ON-AVON West Midlands 37% £101,481
STAFFORD West Midlands 37% £60,601
WAKEFIELD Yorkshire and the Humber 37% £41,782
EAST STAFFORDSHIRE West Midlands 37% £57,741
LANCASTER North West England 36% £44,101
CHERWELL South East England 36% £84,465
WEST OXFORDSHIRE South East England 36% £102,970
HALTON North West England 36% £43,270
SELBY Yorkshire and the Humber 36% £58,308
SOMERSET WEST AND TAUNTON South West England 36% £73,755
HYNDBURN North West England 36% £22,859
SOUTHAMPTON South East England 36% £46,093
DAVENTRY East Midlands 36% £87,603
CITY OF PLYMOUTH South West England 36% £49,943
RICHMONDSHIRE Yorkshire and the Humber 35% £60,159
SOUTH DERBYSHIRE East Midlands 35% £53,192
WORCESTER West Midlands 34% £59,382
SWINDON South West England 34% £57,843
CHORLEY North West England 34% £48,460
COPELAND North West England 34% £30,306
VALE OF WHITE HORSE South East England 33% £96,534
ALLERDALE North West England 33% £42,034
WREKIN West Midlands 32% £46,334
RIBBLE VALLEY North West England 32% £55,300
NORTH TYNESIDE North East England 32% £41,883
WYRE North West England 32% £40,716
HAMBLETON Yorkshire and the Humber 32% £67,944
FYLDE North West England 31% £54,147
EDEN North West England 31% £51,854
NORTHUMBERLAND North East England 31% £49,278
SOUTH RIBBLE North West England 30% £40,737
PRESTON North West England 29% £28,236
REDCAR AND CLEVELAND North East England 28% £24,717
HARTLEPOOL North East England 28% £21,339
BLACKPOOL North West England 28% £23,142
CARLISLE North West England 27% £30,344
COUNTY DURHAM North East England 26% £22,129
NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE North East England 24% £39,463
STOCKTON-ON-TEES North East England 24% £27,402
GATESHEAD North East England 24% £28,569
MIDDLESBROUGH North East England 24% £16,654
SOUTH TYNESIDE North East England 22% £28,214
SUNDERLAND North East England 22% £22,110
DARLINGTON North East England 21% £23,248
Source: Hamptons       

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Porsche has confirmed that it sold more Taycan electric vehicles than models of the German car maker’s legendary 911 sports cars in 2021, as it posted the highest sales in its 91-year history.

It confirmed on Wednesday morning deliveries of 41,296 battery-powered Taycans – which cost from £72,850 – worldwide last year.

That compared with 38,464 sales of its most iconic performance model, which was itself an annual record for the 911 nameplate in its 59-year history. 

Demand for Taycans helped push Porsche to a new record of 301,915 sales last year and is further evidence of the increasing demand for electric models, even in the sports car sector. However, it was Porsche’s SUVs that still sold in the biggest numbers.

Over-Taycan: Porsche sold more examples of its all-electric sports car than its flagship 911 in 2021 as customers embraced performance models with plugs

Over-Taycan: Porsche sold more examples of its all-electric sports car than its flagship 911 in 2021 as customers embraced performance models with plugs

Topping the charts in 2021 was the Macan, with 88,362 deliveries. This was marginally ahead of the bigger Cayenne with 83,071 sold last year.  

Porsche said the 911, which was first launched back in 1963 as the 901, was handed over to more customers than ever before, but appetite for its all-electric Taycan eclipsed its long-running sports car icon.

Best-selling Porsches worldwide in 2021 

The Macan SUV was Porsche's best seller

The Macan SUV was Porsche’s best seller

1. Macan – 88,362

2. Cayenne – 83,071

3. Taycan – 41,296

4. 911 – 38,464

5. Panamera – 30,220

6. 718 Boxster/Cayman – 20,502

Source: Porsche AG 

Taycan sales were boosted by the arrival of the Cross Turismo shooting brake body style and the arrival of an entry-level rear-wheel drive version in 2021.

The bumper Taycan sales are another example of how traditional car makers are eating into Tesla’s dominance of the luxury electric car market. 

The results are a sliding door moment for the German marque, which had already started to embrace electrification with plug-in hybrid versions of other models in its range, including the Cayenne and Panamera.

And it also suggests that buyers of high-performance cars are coming around to the concept of extremely fast machines without the soundtrack of a combustion engine. 

The full-year sales report shows that around two in five Porsches delivered in Europe in 2021 were ‘electrified’ models, either hybrids or 100 per cent electric Taycans. 

‘The overall result is very promising and shows the strategy to further electrify our fleet is working and is in line with demand and the preferences of our customers,’ said Detlev von Platen, member of the executive board responsible for Sales and Marketing at Porsche AG. 

Porsche delivered 41,296 battery-powered Taycans (left) - which cost from £72,850 - worldwide last year. That compared with 38,464 sales of 59-year history icon, the 911

Porsche delivered 41,296 battery-powered Taycans (left) – which cost from £72,850 – worldwide last year. That compared with 38,464 sales of 59-year history icon, the 911

The results are a sliding door moment for the German marque, which had already started to embrace electrification with plug-in hybrid versions of other models

The results are a sliding door moment for the German marque, which had already started to embrace electrification with plug-in hybrid versions of other models

Taycan sales were boosted by the arrival of the Cross Turismo shooting brake body style and the arrival of an entry-level rear-wheel drive version in 2021

Taycan sales were boosted by the arrival of the Cross Turismo shooting brake body style and the arrival of an entry-level rear-wheel drive version in 2021

While Taycan sales were impressive, Porsche’s most popular models are still its SUVs. 

And the popularity of Macan will likely see a rise in electric car sales for Porsche in 2022, with the brand set to reveal a new model in a matter of months, including a battery-powered version.

The new all-electric Macan will be sold alongside the existing combustion engine model during a transition period, with Porsche targeting for 80 per cent of all deliveries to be electric by 2030. 

Taycan sales didn't eclipse 911 deliveries because of a poor year for the legendary petrol-powered sports car. In fact, 911 had its best sales figures on record

Taycan sales didn’t eclipse 911 deliveries because of a poor year for the legendary petrol-powered sports car. In fact, 911 had its best sales figures on record

Porsche's Detlev von Platen (pictured) said the sales figured were 'very promising' for the brand's strategy to further electrify its fleet

Porsche’s Detlev von Platen (pictured) said the sales figured were ‘very promising’ for the brand’s strategy to further electrify its fleet

The 301,915 total sales in 2021 was an 11 per cent rise on the previous record in 2020.

Growth was especially strong in the USA, where 22 per cent more vehicles were delivered than in the previous year. 

However, China remains the largest single market for the sports car manufacturer, with 95,671 units being an increase of eight per cent on 2020.

Record sales were achieved in the face of ongoing semiconductor shortages and production issues.

Mr von Platen said: ‘Despite the challenges posed by the semi-conductor shortage and the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic we have been working hard to enable more customers than ever before to fulfil their dream of owning a Porsche.

‘Demand remains high and our order books are looking very robust, so we start 2022 full of momentum and confidence in all regions of the world.’ 

Lamborghini also posted a new sales record in 2021… but three in five deliveries were NOT supercars

Another luxury car brand to announced record sales last year is Lamborghini, which like Porsche is owned by the VW Group.

A total of 8,405 cars were delivered worldwide, up by 13 per cent on 2020. 

In the UK alone, 564 Lamborghinis were bought, which is 9 per cent more than the year previous.

Lamborghini posted record deliveries in 2021, though three in five models sold were Urus SUVs rather than its low-slung (and more expensive) supercars

Lamborghini posted record deliveries in 2021, though three in five models sold were Urus SUVs rather than its low-slung (and more expensive) supercars

The majority of the sales success can be attributed to Lamborghini’s first SUV, the Urus.

The brand shifted 5,021 examples of the high-performance 4X4 last term, which means that three in five Lamborghinis bought were SUV models. 

Stephan Winkelmann, chairman and CEO, said: ‘This record has provided confirmation of four factors for us: the solidity of our strategic plan, our brand’s outstanding international reputation, the competence and passion of our people and the exceptional professionalism and dynamism shown by our 173 dealers in 52 markets, who have continued to invest alongside us at a challenging, uncertain time.’

Lamborghini is set embark on its first phase towards electrification by launching the first in its new hybrid range of supercars from 2023. 

Britain’s top 10 most-bought cars in 2021 

10. Toyota Yaris

2021 registrations: 27,415

2020 ranking: 15th (up 5 places)

The Yaris picked up a number of awards in 2021. Toyota's impressive management of the semiconductor chip shortage helped the supermini gatecrash the top 10 best sellers in the UK last year

The Yaris picked up a number of awards in 2021. Toyota’s impressive management of the semiconductor chip shortage helped the supermini gatecrash the top 10 best sellers in the UK last year

The all-new Yaris was named 2021 European Car of the Year and picked up a number of different accolades last year, also boosted by the huge popularity of the GR Yaris rally-inspired hot hatch.

Glowing recommendations weren’t what entirely drove the Japanese supermini to tenth spot in the overall sales standings.

Toyota was one of the brands that best managed the semiconductor chip shortage last year, having stockpiled the essential parts. However, in August it was hit by supply issues, with the company forced to suspend production during September. Still, the impressive small car racked up enough sales to scrape into the top 10. 

Toyota’s impressive management of the chip shortage also saw it become the best-selling car maker in the United States, dethroning General Motors, which had held the crown as US’s favourite brand every year since 1931. 

9. Kia Sportage

2021 registrations: 27,611

2020 ranking: 16th (up 7 places)

Price: from £26,745 (2022 model)

Kia dealers would have been shifting their remaining stock of Sportage SUVs before the all-new 2022 car is due to arrive in their showrooms early this year

Kia dealers would have been shifting their remaining stock of Sportage SUVs before the all-new 2022 car is due to arrive in their showrooms early this year

The Sportage has always been a relatively popular family SUV in the UK, taking sixteenth spot overall in 2020. The rise to ninth spot last year is likely due to cars being available to buy. 

That’s because an all-new Sportage hits the market in 2022, meaning dealers would have been shifting the remaining stock of previous-generation examples. 

Why is it so attractive to buyers in Britain? Firstly, it is competitively priced – and that’s before you take into account any discounts with dealerships looking to make space in their showrooms for the arrival of the 2022 model.

But it is also packed with loads of equipment and is sold with Kia’s long-lasting seven-year warranty.

8. Ford Puma

2021 registrations: 28,697

2020 ranking: 9th (up 1 place)

The Puma is - incredibly - the only Ford to make it into the top 10 best-selling new cars of 2021, with the Fiesta and Focus slipping out of the rankings for the first time in decades

The Puma is – incredibly – the only Ford to make it into the top 10 best-selling new cars of 2021, with the Fiesta and Focus slipping out of the rankings for the first time in decades

Like the Toyota Yaris, the Ford Puma has picked up plenty of awards since it hit the market a couple of year ago, winning a string of gongs in 2020.

Incredibly, it’s the only Ford model in the top 10 list of best-selling cars, with both the Focus and – incredibly – the Fiesta dropping out of the order for the first time in decades.

Insiders suggest the reason for the pair of Ford stalwarts falling down the pecking order of registrations wasn’t a case of dwindling demand but a shift in tactics by the company as it appeared to prioritise semiconductor availability for the production of its commercial vehicles.   

The Puma officially becomes the best-selling compact SUV in 2021, retaining the accolade from 2020 by leading the expanding sector. 

7. Nissan Qashqai

2021 registrations: 29,992

2020 ranking: 6th (down 1 place)

The Qashqai has been the best-selling SUV in Britain since it first hit the market over a decade ago. In 2021, it retained that crown

The Qashqai has been the best-selling SUV in Britain since it first hit the market over a decade ago. In 2021, it retained that crown

The Qashqai has retained its crown of Britain’s most popular SUV in 2021, amassing more sales than any of its rivals yet again – a feat it has managed ever since it was first introduced in 2007. 

One big factor helping to boost the Qashqai’s popularity among Britons is the fact it is produced on our shores, with the SUV assembled at Nissan’s Sunderland factory. And a new version arrived in 2021 offering mild-hybrid technology, plenty of extra equipment, a boost in practicality and fresh new looks.

A combination of orders for the third-generation car and sales of remaining second-gen model stocks in showrooms has kept it firmly among the best-selling new passenger vehicles of the previous 12 months.

A new ‘e-Power’ hybrid is set to be made available soon, which should help to cement the Qashqai’s position among the most popular motors in 2022 as drivers switch to greener vehicles. 

6. Volkswagen Golf

2021 registrations: 30,240

2020 ranking: 3rd (down 3 places)

The VW Golf 8 hit the market in 2020, meaning it has been on sale during one of the most difficult recent periods for the automotive sector

The VW Golf 8 hit the market in 2020, meaning it has been on sale during one of the most difficult recent periods for the automotive sector

Every car maker has suffered as a result of the semiconductor shortage, with automotive giant VW also caught up in the global issue.

As a result, the Golf – traditionally Volkswagen’s best-selling new car – has slipped down the charts to sixth, having been the third most popular model in Britain behind the Vauxhall Corsa and Ford Fiesta in 2020.

Reduced outputs at the brand’s Wolfsburg plant mean the German car maker has a backlog of Golf orders to fulfil. 

The eighth-generation car hit the market last year, meaning it has arrived at one of the most difficult times for the sector.

5. Volkswagen Polo

2021 registrations: 30,634

2020 ranking: 8th (up 3 places)

The Polo rose above its bigger VW sibling - the Golf - in the sales charts in 2021, with figures likely bolstered by the sales of remaining stocks of the previous-generation model that has recently been replaced

The Polo rose above its bigger VW sibling – the Golf – in the sales charts in 2021, with figures likely bolstered by the sales of remaining stocks of the previous-generation model that has recently been replaced

Like the Golf, there is a new Polo on the market, which arrived on sale late last year.

That means its position of fifth in the 2021 rankings is likely a result of available stock being sold to make way for the latest iteration, with order books for the latter opening around September.

This has pushed the Polo above its bigger sibling in the UK sales charts for the first time in years. 

Registrations hit 30,634 last year, which was 394 examples more than the Golf.  Volkswagen – for the first time on record – was the most popular car brand in Britain last year, overtaking Ford.

4. Mercedes-Benz A-Class

2021 registrations: 30,710

2020 ranking: 5th (up 1 place)

The Mercedes A-Class, which starts from just under £26,000, is now the most popular new family hatchback bought by Britons

The Mercedes A-Class, which starts from just under £26,000, is now the most popular new family hatchback bought by Britons

The UK has a new favourite family hatchback – and it’s a premium model.

The Mercedes A-Class now outsells the VW Golf, Ford Focus, Vauxhall Astra and every other mainstream family hatch on the market, and has also completely thrashed the BMW 1 Series – arguably its closest rival.

This second-generation A-Class only arrived on the market late in 2017 but has had a big impact on UK buyers and proved a huge hit thanks to attractive finance deals.

Private customers and fleet operators have been lapping it up due to its quality interior and high safety standards. This has seen the Merc move one place higher in the sales standings than last year. 

3.  Mini Hatchback

2021 registrations: 31,792

2020 ranking: 7th (up 4 places)

Despite pausing production in April due to the semiconductor shortage, Mini has sold enough hatchbacks to warrant taking third spot in the sales charts for 2021

Despite pausing production in April due to the semiconductor shortage, Mini has sold enough hatchbacks to warrant taking third spot in the sales charts for 2021

The Minis rise to the third most-bought new car in 2021 is despite owners BMW being forced to pause assembly lines at its Plant Oxford site in April, again due to semiconductor shortages.

Yet some 31,792 examples of the compact hatchback – both three and five-door models – were registered in the UK, according to the latest SMMT figures. 

This means the Mini has jumped four places higher in the popularity ranks for UK drivers compared to a year ago. 

The Mini Electric – also built at the Oxford factory – likely helped to boost sales, with the zero-emission version of the car the seventh best-selling pure-electric vehicle last year. 

2. Tesla Model 3

2021 registrations: 34,783

2020 ranking: 14th (up 12 places)

Incredibly, the Tesla Model 3 - despite its £43,000 starting price - was the second most-bought new car in Britain last year, official figures have confirmed

Incredibly, the Tesla Model 3 – despite its £43,000 starting price – was the second most-bought new car in Britain last year, official figures have confirmed

In 2020 the Tesla Model 3 set a new record by becoming the first fully-electric car to break into the top 15 best sellers in Britain.

Last year, it went to dizzying new heights and has become the second most-bought new passenger car in the country, with a massive 34,783 registrations during 2021. 

Incredibly, at the end of November the Model 3 wasn’t even among the top 10. 

However, a shipment that arrived in the final month of the year – as tends to be the case with Teslas mostly coming to the UK in bulk at the end of each quarter – saw it leap up the standings, with 9,612 Model 3s (almost a third) registered in December alone. 

The majority of Model 3 customers will be company car drivers who are taking advantage of the lucrative salary sacrifice scheme with low benefit in kind taxation of 1 per cent for electric vehicles.

1. Vauxhall Corsa

2021 registrations: 40,914

2020 ranking: 2nd (up 1 place)

The Vauxhall Corsa has brought to an end the Ford Fiesta's 12-year stint at the top of the UK's best-selling cars standings. It is also the first time a Ford hasn't been the nation's most-bought new model since 1971

The Vauxhall Corsa has brought to an end the Ford Fiesta’s 12-year stint at the top of the UK’s best-selling cars standings. It is also the first time a Ford hasn’t been the nation’s most-bought new model since 1971

The Ford Fiesta has been the top-selling new car in Britain for the previous 12 years. But it has been forced to pass the baton to a new king, the Corsa.

It will be a bitter pill for Ford to swallow, passing the gong to its nearest rival, and brings to an end a 50 year run of a Ford topping the sales charts. 

It also spells the end of a record held by the brand for half a century. The last time a car without the blue oval badge on its bonnet (either the Cortina, Escort, Focus or Fiesta) was crowned the nation’s best seller was in 1971 when the Austin/Morris 1100/1300 topped the registration rankings.

The Corsas rise to the top is down to a combination of factors, including plenty of fleet sales and the popularity of its all-electric Corsa-e, which was the ninth most-bought pure electric car in Britain in 2021.

However, the Corsa WASN’T the best-selling motor in Britain last year… 

NATION’S BEST-SELLING VEHICLE OVERALL IN 2021: Ford Transit Custom van

2021 registrations: 53,394

2020 ranking: Behind Vauxhall Corsa and Ford Fiesta (up 2 places)

Price: from £28,825 (excl VAT)

While the Vauxhall Corsa might be the best-selling car of 2021, more new Transit Custom vans (right) were registered in the UK last year. Some 53,394 entered the road, along with 34,293 two-tonne Transits (left) - which would be enough to earn it third position in the list above (fourth if including the Transit Custom), ahead of the Mini Hatchback

While the Vauxhall Corsa might be the best-selling car of 2021, more new Transit Custom vans (right) were registered in the UK last year. Some 53,394 entered the road, along with 34,293 two-tonne Transits (left) – which would be enough to earn it third position in the list above (fourth if including the Transit Custom), ahead of the Mini Hatchback 

That’s right, the best-selling new motor in the UK last year wasn’t a car but a van.

A total of around 355,000 vans sold in 2021 – up 21 per cent on 2020 and only two per cent down on 2019. 

Ford’s Transit Custom topped the commercial vehicle sales charts, amassing 53,394 registrations, which is more than any car model last year and  12,480 units ahead of the Vauxhall Corsa.

Industry insiders claim the rise in demand for vans due to the increasing reliance on deliveries during the pandemic saw Ford prioritise its semiconductor availability to its commercial vehicles. For those manufacturers that build them, vans also offer stronger profit margins than passenger cars because they are less expensive to produce. 

It also explains why the two-tonne Transit also sold in massive numbers last year with 34,923 registrations – enough to place ahead of the Mini Hatchback in the list above.

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