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The view of Hereford Cathedral from the River Wye

The view of Hereford Cathedral from the River Wye

With pretty villages renowned for 14th Century black-and-white timbered homes, historic market towns and swathes of undulating, unspoilt countryside, Herefordshire is undoubtedly one of England’s best-looking counties.

Yet it is also one that has fallen under the radar of mass tourism, making it a draw for those seeking a slice of England away from the crowds. The allure, apart from top-notch places to stay, is the growing foodie scene. Herefordshire produces some of this country’s most delicious fayre, from succulent beef and juicy blackcurrants to phenomenal beer, gin and cider.

And as well as familiar big names such as Westons Cider, Chase gin and Tyrrells crisps, there are hundreds of smaller producers and restaurants serving up culinary feasts to tuck into any time of the year.

CORE ATTRACTION 

Apples are the most famous of the county’s many crops, and Herefordshire makes fabulous cider. Recently introduced ‘cider circuits’ are a great way to tour the area’s best producers.

Each self-guided circuit starts and ends at Hereford Cathedral, covers about 45 miles and can be done by bike or car.

The Market House on the main shopping street in Ledbury. It's possible to go on a cider and perry 'tour and tasting' in the town

The Market House on the main shopping street in Ledbury. It’s possible to go on a cider and perry ‘tour and tasting’ in the town

Glorious: A crop of apples heading to cider-makers. Recently introduced ‘cider circuits’ are a great way to tour Herefordshire's best producers

Glorious: A crop of apples heading to cider-makers. Recently introduced ‘cider circuits’ are a great way to tour Herefordshire’s best producers

Or call in on cider and perry producers such as Westons Cider Mill at Ledbury for a tour and a tasting (westons-cider.co.uk).

It’s also worth looking out for regular apple-themed menus and activities in pubs, hotels and restaurants across the region. That way you know you’re getting the freshest and tastiest local produce.

Settle in at the Green Dragon Hotel in the heart of Hereford and close to the cathedral, where its 83 rooms have been brilliantly refurbished in bold and bright jewel colours. B&B from £89 per room per night (greendragonhotel.com).

BERRY TASTY

Another local drink to sip is White Heron’s British Cassis – blackcurrant liqueur. It featured on the BBC show Dragons’ Den and is now sold everywhere from Waitrose to Fortnum & Mason.

Take a fascinating tour of 700-acre Whittern Farms in Lyonshall to see how it’s produced. You’ll get to see behind the scenes, visit a blackcurrant plantation (the finest berries head to Ribena) and bottle up your own cassis to take home.

The two-hour tour, which includes a 200ml bottle of cassis and a cocktail, costs £50 arrangement fee plus £20pp.

The estate also has holiday cottages which sleep four to eight guests, some with access to an outdoor pool. Or there’s The Colloquy, a luxurious property with squash court, sauna and hot tub. Prices start at £2,500 for a two-night stay for 16 people (whiteheronproperties.com).

Another estate offers an even grander place to relax. The old pigsty and outbuildings of the Whitbourne Estate have been reborn as Crumplebury and will take your breath away.

Whittern Farms in Lyonshall has holiday cottages that sleep four to eight guests, some with access to an outdoor pool (pictured)

Whittern Farms in Lyonshall has holiday cottages that sleep four to eight guests, some with access to an outdoor pool (pictured)

Heavenly attraction: Pictured above is Lyonshall's St Michael and All Angels church

Heavenly attraction: Pictured above is Lyonshall’s St Michael and All Angels church 

Fine dining at Pensons on the Netherwood Estate near Bromyard

Fine dining at Pensons on the Netherwood Estate near Bromyard

The out-in-the-wilds property now includes the renowned Green Cow Kitchens fine dining restaurant plus an exclusive-use state-of-the-art wedding and events venue with uber-luxurious on-site accommodation. The restaurant makes the most of the meat produced on the estate and fresh herbs such as wild garlic which are foraged from the fields by the chefs.

B&B costs from £165 per night (crumplebury.co.uk).

STARRY STARRY NIGHT

What better way to celebrate a special anniversary or event than an unforgettable Michelin-starred meal at Pensons on the Netherwood Estate near Bromyard.

Showcasing the best local produce, the tasting menu features cured sea trout with carrot, orange and saffron, monkfish, venison, spiced red wine pear with vanilla panna cotta… need I say more?

The cost is £440 per night for two guests, including the five-course tasting menu, breakfast and a courtyard bedroom – that’s actually a bargain.

The estate also has several luxurious large houses to rent (pensons.co.uk).

Or check in to The Baiting House in Upper Sapey, a small village close to the Worcestershire border. The pub was stylishly refurbished by a local couple in 2015 and now offers beautifully simple rooms and self-catering lodges with private patios and hot tub. The locally sourced menu changes daily, but examples include dishes such as chicken liver parfait and beer-battered hake and chips. Rooms from £75 per room per night (baitinghouse.co.uk).

The Baiting House in Upper Sapey, pictured, offers beautifully simple rooms and self-catering lodges

The Baiting House in Upper Sapey, pictured, offers beautifully simple rooms and self-catering lodges

The locally sourced menu at The Baiting House changes daily. The pub, pictured, was stylishly refurbished by a local couple in 2015

The locally sourced menu at The Baiting House changes daily. The pub, pictured, was stylishly refurbished by a local couple in 2015

Tasty: A Beefy Boys burger, made with super-succulent, 21-day-aged Hereford beef

SO-JUICY BURGERS

Want to taste probably the juiciest beefburger in the world? 

Head for The Beefy Boys in Hereford – but you may need to book ahead.

Set up in the Old Market in 2016, the restaurant serves burgers made with super succulent, 21-day-aged Hereford beef, freshly ground each day and available in all shapes and flavours. 

Go for the original Beefy Boy with its secret sauce or tackle the Dirty Boy with bacon, cheese and beef dripping onions. 

Milkshakes come in hard or soft varieties (with or without alcohol) and are to die for (thebeefyboys.com).

GIN THAT’S A TONIC 

The town of Ross-on-Wye, pictured, is home to The Bridge House B&B. It boasts 'spacious gardens and river views'

The town of Ross-on-Wye, pictured, is home to The Bridge House B&B. It boasts ‘spacious gardens and river views’ 

Chase produces vodka that’s so good it is exported to Russia!

You’ll learn more fascinating facts on a tour of the Chase Distillery in Preston Wynne, just 20 minutes outside Hereford, including how owner and entrepreneur William Chase switched from growing potatoes for supermarkets to making high-end Tyrrells crisps to producing outstanding vodka and gin.

You’ll be invited to taste classic GB Gin, made with ten botanicals including ginger and liquorice root, and the zesty Pink Grapefruit & Pomelo Gin. Tickets cost from £20pp (chasedistillery.co.uk).

Alternatively, make your own gin at Black Mountains Botanicals, from £120pp using your own still with the help of a master distiller. Tastings included, naturally (blackmountainsbotanicals.co.uk).

Stay at The Bridge House, Ross-on-Wye, a lovely B&B with spacious gardens and river views, from £110 per room per night (bridgehouserossonwye.co.uk).

GET AROUND AND A BITE 

Foraging for food turns out to be another great way to explore Herefordshire’s stunning countryside. The spoils change with the season, and include mushrooms, nuts, herbs, berries and other fruits.

Local foraging expert Liz Knight teaches guests how to recognise each one and where to find it. Private two-and-a-half-hour walks for a group of up to 12 people cost £250 (foragefinefoods.com). Stay at gourmands’ heaven The Riverside at Aymestrey, with Herefordshire snails, free-range chicken and juicy Hereford beef on the menu. B&B from £95 per room per night (riversideaymestrey.co.uk).

CURRYING FAVOUR

Rayeesa Asghar-Sandys teaches an Indian cookery class in the village of Mordiford (pictured), near Hereford

Rayeesa Asghar-Sandys teaches an Indian cookery class in the village of Mordiford (pictured), near Hereford

Tuck in: Afternoon tea at Castle House hotel can be spiced up with a glass of fizz

Tuck in: Afternoon tea at Castle House hotel can be spiced up with a glass of fizz

Learn how to spice up your life on an Indian cookery class in the farmhouse kitchen of Rayeesa Asghar-Sandys in Mordiford, near Hereford.

Rayeesa, a former Met police officer who appeared on Dragons’ Den with her range of curry sauces, Spiced by Rayeesa, will show you how to select the finest Herefordshire ingredients to create scrumptious main dishes and sides. Her next class, the Essential Indian on January 25, costs £175pp (spicedbyrayeesa.com).

Stay at the stylishly refurbished The Greenman in Fownhope. B&B from £70 per room per night (thegreenman.co).

TWICE AS NICE  

The Nest near Ledbury isn’t just a gem of a cafe, it’s a delicatessen stuffed with a tempting smorgasbord of Hereford goodies for the larder, plus a local art gallery and plant centre (nestledbury.co.uk).

It is also home to the Handmade Scotch Egg Company, so lunch must include at least one – how about Braveheart, featuring pork with chilli and fresh lime? So tasty and it definitely represents a substantial meal.

Stay at The Feathers in Ledbury, a cosy black-and-white Tudor coaching inn. B&B from £110 per room per night (feathersledbury.co.uk).

TEA TIME 

Castle House is a perfect place for afternoon tea – a luxurious, elegant hotel tucked away in a quiet spot beside Hereford’s old moat in which you might spot otters playing.

Tea, from £16pp and served Wednesday to Saturday, includes finger sandwiches, savouries, scones and cakes washed down with locally blended teas and coffees – and you can add a glass of fizz for a tenner. Do treat yourself to an overnight stay – B&B from £155 per room per night (castlehse.co.uk).

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A winter’s day in a remote graveyard in Suffolk. On the north side of the church — the dark side, the cold side — we find a dense grove of old yew trees, and a hidden grave.

Matthew retrieves something from the earth: an old bone. ‘A rabbit?’ I suggest. He shakes his head. It’s a human finger bone.

Respectfully, we replace the fragment exactly where we found it, and return to the south side of the church. Behind us, the yew trees shiver.

Fact and fiction: St Peter’s in Great Livermere. Montague Rhodes James called the 'remote and sleepy' village home

Fact and fiction: St Peter’s in Great Livermere. Montague Rhodes James called the ‘remote and sleepy’ village home 

For we are in the churchyard of St Peter’s at Great Livermere, the village that England’s greatest ghost-story writer, Montague Rhodes James, called home, and where his father was rector. One of his spookiest stories, The Ash-Tree, features a house similar to the rectory here, where James spent his boyhood, and a terrifying witch, long dead, called Mothersole.

The name on the grave we have just discovered under the yews? Mothersole.

Matthew, a Suffolk local, explains that his county is rich in haunted country houses, often inhabited by the same families for generations, with an old church nearby, bells intoning through the mist.

It was just this landscape that inspired James, who passed a long, serene life (1862-1936) as a Cambridge don, poring over medieval manuscripts; and, late at night, composing his spine-chilling tales.

The BBC has adapted The Mezzotint, one of M. R. James’s classic ghost stories. Pictured from the left are the cast of the BBC adaptation, with Rory Kinnear (playing Edward Williams), Nikesh Patel (Nisbet), and Robert Bathurst (Garwood)

The BBC has adapted The Mezzotint, one of M. R. James’s classic ghost stories. Pictured from the left are the cast of the BBC adaptation, with Rory Kinnear (playing Edward Williams), Nikesh Patel (Nisbet), and Robert Bathurst (Garwood)

Rory Kinnear stars in the BBC adaptation of James’s spooky tale - A Ghost Story for Christmas: The Mezzotint - which will air on Christmas Eve

Rory Kinnear stars in the BBC adaptation of James’s spooky tale – A Ghost Story for Christmas: The Mezzotint – which will air on Christmas Eve

James once claimed that he saw a real ghost on the edge of the Brecklands woodland, at Oldbroom Plantation (pictured). Picture courtesy of Creative Commons

A photograph of James, who Christopher describes as 'England’s greatest ghost-story writer'

James once claimed that he saw a real ghost on the edge of the Brecklands woodland, at Oldbroom Plantation (pictured on the left). Picture courtesy of Creative Commons. On the right is a photograph of James, who Christopher describes as ‘England’s greatest ghost-story writer’

'We lunch at the little fishing port of Felixstowe Ferry (pictured), where the River Deben curves out into the North Sea, creating a treacherous sandbar across the mouth of the estuary,' writes Christopher

‘We lunch at the little fishing port of Felixstowe Ferry (pictured), where the River Deben curves out into the North Sea, creating a treacherous sandbar across the mouth of the estuary,’ writes Christopher  

They often featured academics like himself, investigating ancient texts or artefacts and disturbing something terrible. James — whose story The Mezzotint has been adapted by the BBC and will be shown on Christmas Eve — would then read his tales to friends in his rooms in King’s College, Cambridge, by candlelight.

A remote and sleepy village, Great Livermere is the first stop on our M. R. James winter pilgrimage. It stands on the edge of that mysterious stretch of country called the Brecklands, a barely inhabited grassland sparsely dotted with trees and thorn thickets. In his story A Vignette, James records the only time he saw a real ghost — ‘the eyes were large and open and fixed . . . a glamour of madness about it’ — on the edge of the woodland here called Oldbroom Plantation, which stands to this day.

From here it’s a rambling drive east across the county to the coast north of Felixstowe. James used to stay at the Bath Hotel here. We lunch at the little fishing port of Felixstowe Ferry, where the River Deben curves out into the North Sea, creating a treacherous sandbar across the mouth of the estuary. 

Christopher's final stop is in the town of Aldeburgh, pictured. He says that the area was 'much loved by James'

Christopher’s final stop is in the town of Aldeburgh, pictured. He says that the area was ‘much loved by James’ 

The centre of Aldeburgh. According to Christopher, James created the tale A Warning To The Curious during his time in the town

 The centre of Aldeburgh. According to Christopher, James created the tale A Warning To The Curious during his time in the town

Christopher stays at The Angel Hotel in the Suffolk town of Bury St Edmunds (pictured)

Christopher stays at The Angel Hotel in the Suffolk town of Bury St Edmunds (pictured)

Rooms at The Angel Hotel, pictured, start at £69 pp. Visit www.theangel.co.uk for more information

Rooms at The Angel Hotel, pictured, start at £69 pp. Visit www.theangel.co.uk for more information

Small boats bob about on the river, halyards clanking in the wind and gulls loitering ready to pounce.

This is the coastal landscape of one of James’s most terrifying tales, Oh, Whistle, And I’ll Come To You, My Lad, complete with golf course, just as he described it (he hated golf). 

Take a walk along this atmospherically desolate coast, or inland over Falkenham Marshes, and you can understand James’s fascination.

Finally, on to Aldeburgh, much loved by James. Even here, though, his haunted imagination created the tale A Warning To The Curious, featuring the sinister figure of one William Ager. 

He is said to live north of the town, in an isolated cottage on the heath.

Not all the great writers of the haunted and strange evoke specific locales, but when they do — Dickens’s Kentish marshes, Conan Doyle’s Dartmoor — the effect can be spine-tingling.

James’s Suffolk is just such a landscape, a perfect destination for exploring on a bleak winter’s day. 

And wherever there is an old country house, dark woodland, empty heathland or a remote medieval church, there, surely, the ghost of the genial old Cambridge don still wanders. 

In Aldeburgh, Christopher stayed at the White Lion Hotel, pictured, where rooms cost from £78 pp

In Aldeburgh, Christopher stayed at the White Lion Hotel, pictured, where rooms cost from £78 pp

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On the coastal path near Kingsdown you can sometimes lose track of time, especially if you’re relying on your mobile phone.

The trail rises along cliffs above the pebble beach, passing dream homes facing the Channel, with the faint outline of France on the horizon. One moment you may look at your phone and it’s 10am. The next, time will have leapt forward to 11am.

In this peaceful part of the Kent coast, you are so close to French shores — about 20 miles away — that technology sometimes thinks you are in Calais.

Tom Chesshyre says that 'you can sometimes lose track of time' walking on the coastal path at Kingsdown (pictured at the far left of the image). The village on the right is Walmer. This stretch of coastline is only about 20 miles from France. 'This is about as close to "going abroad" as you can get, without actually doing so,' Tom adds

Tom Chesshyre says that ‘you can sometimes lose track of time’ walking on the coastal path at Kingsdown (pictured at the far left of the image). The village on the right is Walmer. This stretch of coastline is only about 20 miles from France. ‘This is about as close to “going abroad” as you can get, without actually doing so,’ Tom adds 

Historic: Walmer Castle was built by Henry VIII in 1539-40 to protect Britain from different invaders

Historic: Walmer Castle was built by Henry VIII in 1539-40 to protect Britain from different invaders

‘It’s caught me out many a time,’ says the barmaid at The Coastguard pub, a few miles on in St Margaret’s at Cliffe. A sign says that this pub is the closest one to France on mainland Britain.

‘A votre sante,’ we say, toasting our hike with Kentish ale. This is about as close to ‘going abroad’ as you can get, without actually doing so — and you can understand why Noel Coward and Ian Fleming were both drawn to live here. 

Tucked away by the cliffs, with the ferries churning across to France, there is an inspiring feeling of living on the edge.

Kingsdown is a village with 1,750 inhabitants, a first-rate butcher’s, a grocery shop, a church and three fine pubs of its own: the Kings Head, the Rising Sun and — maybe the best of the lot, as it’s on the beach — the Zetland Arms.

Tom describes the setting of Walmer Castle, pictured above, as 'one of England’s most historic spots'

Tom describes the setting of Walmer Castle, pictured above, as ‘one of England’s most historic spots’

Since the 18th century, Walmer Castle (pictured) has been the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports

Since the 18th century, Walmer Castle (pictured) has been the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports

This is a hostelry-to-population ratio that, if matched nationally, would mean we’d have 115,000 pubs across the UK (in reality, there are just over 40,000). 

This also makes it an excellent base for walkers like us tramping the coastal path who fancy a tipple at the end of the day.

And there is plenty of path upon which to tramp — plus all sorts of interest, including one of England’s most historic spots.

Walmer Castle is run by English Heritage and has 'gorgeous gardens'. Pictured is the Queen Mother's Garden

Walmer Castle is run by English Heritage and has ‘gorgeous gardens’. Pictured is the Queen Mother’s Garden

The Queen Mother, pictured, stayed at Walmer Castle as Lord Warden from 1978 to 2002 and 'loved the place'

A hallway at Walmer Castle. 'Nearby Deal and Sandwich have their own castle remains to explore, too,' Tom notes

The Queen Mother, pictured on the left, stayed at Walmer Castle as Lord Warden from 1978 to 2002 and ‘loved the place’. On the right is a hallway at Walmer Castle. ‘Nearby Deal and Sandwich have their own castle remains to explore, too,’ Tom notes

In 55BC, Julius Caesar landed in Kent, coming to blows with squadrons of ‘barbarians’ (us), who were waiting with spears. Skirmishes led to a stand-off before a storm blew in and Caesar and his ships retreated. He returned the next year with more soldiers, experiencing less resistance and surging inland. Again, however, bad weather wrecked his plans.

A plaque in the small town of Walmer, just north of Kingsdown, marks the spot where the Romans may have first arrived. Walmer offers yet another treat for walkers. Its castle was built by Henry VIII in 1539-40 to protect Britain from different invaders: the French.

Since the 18th century, however, it has been the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, the block of ports in Kent, Sussex and Essex. The Queen Mother was Lord Warden from 1978 to 2002 and loved the place. 

Pictured is the Walmer Castle room that is preserved as it was when the Duke of Wellington, the then warden, died there in 1852

Pictured is the Walmer Castle room that is preserved as it was when the Duke of Wellington, the then warden, died there in 1852

The castle is run by English Heritage, with gorgeous gardens and a room preserved as it was when the Duke of Wellington, the then warden, died there in 1852.

Nearby Deal and Sandwich have their own castle remains to explore, too. But the biggie, medieval Dover Castle, lies to the south.

When the sun goes down, though, the place to be is the Zetland Arms. Put your hiking feet up and gaze across the water. Don’t worry what time your phone may think it is — and bon soir.  

Medieval Dover Castle, pictured above, lies to the south of Walmer. Tom describes it as the 'biggie' of the region's castles

Medieval Dover Castle, pictured above, lies to the south of Walmer. Tom describes it as the ‘biggie’ of the region’s castles

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Staycationers, prepare to rub your hands with glee, because a host of eye-catching new hotels and guesthouses are throwing open their doors up and down the British Isles this year.

From Jersey to Blackpool via London, here are seven eye-catching properties to put on your must-visit list…

COUNTRY PILE

Stately stay: The Fairmont Windsor Park, which opened its doors on New Year's Day, overlooks Windsor Great Park

Stately stay: The Fairmont Windsor Park, which opened its doors on New Year’s Day, overlooks Windsor Great Park

One of 200 rooms at the Fairmont Windsor Park. Doubles at the countryside hotel are available from £425

Pictured is the swimming pool at Fairmont Windsor Park. The hotel has a spa with 18 treatment rooms

Pictured is the swimming pool at Fairmont Windsor Park. The hotel has a spa with 18 treatment rooms

A cosy lounge area at the Fairmont Windsor Park, which boasts seven restaurants and bars

A cosy lounge area at the Fairmont Windsor Park, which boasts seven restaurants and bars

The 200-room countryside hotel Fairmont Windsor Park opened on January 1. 

The property overlooks 4,800 acres of Windsor Great Park, has seven restaurants and bars, and a spa with 18 treatment rooms. Book doubles from £425 at Fairmont-windsorpark.com.

ISLAND HOP

The Plus room at the new 122-room Premier Inn that is set to open in St Helier in February

The Plus room at the new 122-room Premier Inn that is set to open in St Helier in February

The hotel, which is set on Bath Street, is close to Elizabeth Castle and some of the island’s best beaches

The hotel, which is set on Bath Street, is close to Elizabeth Castle and some of the island’s best beaches

Fans of Jersey will be pleased to hear a new 122-room Premier Inn will open in St Helier in February. 

On Bath Street, the hotel is close to Elizabeth Castle and some of the island’s best beaches. Rooms from £60 at premierinn.co.uk.

FRESH HEIGHTS

Calm and comforting interiors are one of the highlights at One Hundred Shoreditch, which opens in February

Calm and comforting interiors are one of the highlights at One Hundred Shoreditch, which opens in February

Rooms at the 258-bedroomed One Hundred Shoreditch will start from £175 per night

Rooms at the 258-bedroomed One Hundred Shoreditch will start from £175 per night

The hotel boasts six restaurants and bars, including a rooftop bar with views of East London

The hotel boasts six restaurants and bars, including a rooftop bar with views of East London 

Calm and comforting interiors are one of the highlights at One Hundred Shoreditch which opens in February. 

The Central London hotel has 258 rooms and suites plus six restaurants and bars including a rooftop bar with views of East London. Rooms from £175 at onehundredshoreditch.com.

COSY COMFORT

Cities don’t come much more charming than York and it is home to No 1 guesthouse, pictured

Cities don’t come much more charming than York and it is home to No 1 guesthouse, pictured 

The No 1 guesthouse is a Regency townhouse that has been transformed to feature 39 rooms. Pictured is the guesthouse's lounge area

The No 1 guesthouse is a Regency townhouse that has been transformed to feature 39 rooms. Pictured is the guesthouse’s lounge area 

Pictured is the restaurant at No 1 guesthouse. The building has large sash windows and high ceilings

Pictured is the restaurant at No 1 guesthouse. The building has large sash windows and high ceilings 

One of the guest rooms at No 1 guesthouse. York Minster is a ten-minute walk away

One of the guest rooms at No 1 guesthouse. York Minster is a ten-minute walk away

Cities don’t come much more charming than York and it is home to No 1 guesthouse. 

A Grade II Listed Regency townhouse has been transformed to house 39 rooms (from £139) with large sash windows and high ceilings. York Minster is a ten-minute walk away (guesthousehotels.co.uk).

GO WILDE

Wildes Chester is set to open on Chester’s historic Rows this summer. Pictured is a rendering of the hotel's spa area

Wildes Chester is set to open on Chester’s historic Rows this summer. Pictured is a rendering of the hotel’s spa area

A rendering of one of the 18 rooms at the hotel. Room prices will start from £250 per night

A rendering of one of the 18 rooms at the hotel. Room prices will start from £250 per night

One of the highlights at Wildes Chester, shown here in a rendering, will be X by Harry Guy - a chef who has worked in multiple Michelin-starred restaurants

One of the highlights at Wildes Chester, shown here in a rendering, will be X by Harry Guy – a chef who has worked in multiple Michelin-starred restaurants

Chester’s historic Rows will be home to an 18-room boutique hotel from this summer. 

One of the highlights at Wildes Chester will be X by Harry Guy — a chef who has worked in multiple Michelin-starred restaurants. Rooms from £250 at wildeschester.com.

CLASSY CABINS

Pictured is one of the five Orchard Cabins that Norfolk's Congham Hall Hotel will be launching in February

Pictured is one of the five Orchard Cabins that Norfolk’s Congham Hall Hotel will be launching in February

Each cabin is set in the manor’s apple orchard. Pictured is the view from the interior of one of the cabins

Each cabin is set in the manor’s apple orchard. Pictured is the view from the interior of one of the cabins

Congham Hall Hotel in Norfolk is in business but will also be launching five Orchard Cabins in February.

Each room is set in the Georgian manor’s apple orchard and has a freestanding out-door bath. Book from £399, including dinner and breakfast, at conghamhallhotel.co.uk.

COASTAL CAPER

Blackpool seafront is set to get its first five-star hotel with the opening of Sands Venue Resort. The property will be inspired by 1930s glamour with Art Deco and modern influences throughout. Sign up at sandsvenueresorthotel.co.uk to hear news of an exact opening date and room prices. 

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