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The breathtaking winter wonderland of the Nordic countries is like no other place on Earth. Stunning scenery and a white Christmas are already guaranteed, but throw in exploring ice caves, snowmobile tours, whale spotting and tracking down the real Santa, and you’ve suddenly got the adventure holiday of a lifetime on your hands.

And great news for hunters of the aurora borealis is that this winter there are spectacular new ways to do it. So if you can embrace the cold, we have gathered together the best expeditions, including a night flight in a hot-air balloon in Sweden, or stargazing in the company of an astronomer from The Sky At Night in Iceland.

Lights and action – or get a free cruise to try again

Light show: The aurora borealis above the snowy islands of Lofoten, where fishing villages are found in magnificent fjords

Light show: The aurora borealis above the snowy islands of Lofoten, where fishing villages are found in magnificent fjords

Take a trip on Bergen’s funicular, pictured above, on a tour with travel firm Hurtigruten

Unfortunately you can’t guarantee an aurora sighting, but if they don’t show up on this 15-day expedition up the Norwegian coast to North Cape, travel firm Hurtigruten will give you another seven-day trip free of charge.

The expedition starts and ends in Dover, so you avoid airport hassle. And there are a number of included outings, such as a ride on Bergen’s funicular, a visit to one of the Lofoten islands where fishing villages are found in magnificent fjords, and a coach tour of the dramatic scenery of Senja.

The journey culminates with a visit to North Cape, with its dramatic plateau high above the Arctic Ocean.

Book: Fourteen nights’ full-board costs from £2,999pp (hurtigruten.co.uk).

Up, up and away for the best view of the Northern Lights

Enjoy a morning hot air balloon ride in Sweden, floating above the frozen lakes and forests of Rane River Valley

Enjoy a morning hot air balloon ride in Sweden, floating above the frozen lakes and forests of Rane River Valley

Pictured is one of four cosy tents at the Aurora Safari Camp, which is a good base to spot moose, red fox and reindeer

Pictured is one of four cosy tents at the Aurora Safari Camp, which is a good base to spot moose, red fox and reindeer

The view of the Northern Lights from the 'cone room' at the Aurora Safari Camp. Three nights’ full-board with airport transfers costs from £2,219pp

The view of the Northern Lights from the ‘cone room’ at the Aurora Safari Camp. Three nights’ full-board with airport transfers costs from £2,219pp

Take spotting the Northern Lights to new heights in Sweden by going up in a tethered hot-air balloon for unobstructed views of this stunning natural phenomenon. Or enjoy a morning ride, floating above the frozen lakes and forests of Rane River Valley.

Flights start in February and can be booked by guests staying in one of four cosy tents at the Aurora Safari Camp, which is also a good base to spot moose, red fox and reindeer. The use of fat bikes (mountain bikes with wide tyres), Nordic skis and snowshoes is included, with snowmobiling, dog-sledding and air-ballooning as optional extras.

Book: Three nights’ full-board with airport transfers, but not flights to Lulea, costs from £2,219pp. Balloon experiences cost £199pp to £510pp (discover-the-world.com).

Pristine forests, ski trails… and the spirit of Norway

Norway’s Rondane National Park, pictured above, is ideal for cross-country skiers, who can tackle the trails in the park's pine and birch forests

Norway’s Rondane National Park, pictured above, is ideal for cross-country skiers, who can tackle the trails in the park’s pine and birch forests

Skiers can follow a seven-mile loop right from the door of the Spidsbergseter Hotel, pictured above

Skiers can follow a seven-mile loop right from the door of the Spidsbergseter Hotel, pictured above

A communal area at the Spidsbergseter Hotel. Seven nights’ full-board with flights costs from £1,195pp with inntravel.co.uk

A communal area at the Spidsbergseter Hotel. Seven nights’ full-board with flights costs from £1,195pp with inntravel.co.uk

The untouched wilderness that is Norway’s Rondane National Park is the perfect place for cross-country skiers. Beginners can follow a seven-mile loop right from the door of the Spidsbergseter Hotel near the park, while more experienced skiers can use trails in the pine and birch forests.

There’s an indoor pool, sauna and steam room to unwind in after a day’s skiing, as well as 140 varieties of the Norwegian spirit aquavit available in a former goat barn.

Book: Seven nights’ full-board with flights costs from £1,195pp (inntravel.co.uk).

Sleep in a bird’s nest or plunge into an icy river

The camouflaged Mirrorcube, pictured, is one of seven Treehotel cabins in the pine forests of Harads

The camouflaged Mirrorcube, pictured, is one of seven Treehotel cabins in the pine forests of Harads

Head to the pine forests of Harads to stay in two of Swedish Lapland’s design gems.

First up is the Treehotel, with seven cabins that include the camouflaged Mirrorcube, The UFO and The Bird’s Nest.

Then it’s on to Lulea River and the incredible Arctic Bath hotel and spa. After warming up in the sauna, guests plunge into a circular spa filled with ice-cold river water, and sleep in wood and stone cabins built above the ice or on nearby land.

A two-hour spa ritual is included, but activities from ice-fishing to wildlife photography at the Treehotel cost extra.

Book: Two nights at the Treehotel followed by one night at Arctic Bath, both half- board, cost from £1,868pp with flights (best-served.co.uk).

Chase humpback whales and orcas on a schooner

The last day of the seven-night Gane and Marshall Arctic cruise is spent on the island of Sommaroy (pictured)

The last day of the seven-night Gane and Marshall Arctic cruise is spent on the island of Sommaroy (pictured)

Search for humpback whales and orcas as well as the aurora on a seven-night Arctic cruise. Sail from the Norwegian city of Tromso on board a schooner sleeping just 33 to the island of Senja, known for its spectacular fjords, islets and mountains.

Following the herring shoals that attract whales, the ship will head into the Arctic Circle. The last day is spent on the island of Sommaroy, with the chance to climb Mount Hillesoya as well as good opportunities to spot the Northern Lights.

Book: Seven nights’ full-board costs from £1,812pp, which includes shore excursions but not international flights (ganeandmarshall.com).

All aboard an Arctic Express to the Aurora Sky Station 

Travelling on the Arctic Circle Train is an adventure in itself. Pictured is the train at Abisko Ostra station

Travelling on the Arctic Circle Train is an adventure in itself. Pictured is the train at the Abisko Ostra station

The Northern Lights are elusive, so to maximise your chances of seeing them visit Sweden’s Abisko National Park, home to the Aurora Sky Station.

Ride the chairlift up to the Sky Station and enjoy a four-course meal in the restaurant while waiting for the skies to light up. Getting there on the Arctic Circle Train from Kiruna is part of the adventure. The four-night trip includes two nights in Kiruna itself, the northernmost town in Sweden.

Book: Four nights costs from £1,480pp including flights, B&B in Kiruna, otherwise full-board (regent-holidays.co.uk). 

Join a TV star in Iceland, the land of fire and ice

Enjoy Iceland’s amazing sights, including the Gullfoss waterfall (pictured), on a group trip with omegabreaks.com in search of the Northern Lights

Enjoy Iceland’s amazing sights, including the Gullfoss waterfall (pictured), on a group trip with omegabreaks.com in search of the Northern Lights

 Join Pete Lawrence from the BBC’s The Sky At Night on a group trip in search of the Northern Lights in Iceland.

Spend two nights in a remote location in the town of Hella, where Pete will give a presentation on the aurora before going outside with you to explore the night sky.

You’ll also get to enjoy Iceland’s amazing sights, including the Gullfoss waterfall and the exploding waters at Geyser, as well as the place where Europe’s and America’s tectonic plates are slowly drifting apart.

Book: Five days costs from £799pp, including flights, two nights’ half-board, one night’s B&B in Reykjavik and one night at the airport (omegabreaks.com).

The environmentally-friendly way to go whale-watching 

The city of Tromso, pictured, will be your base on an eco-conscious trip in Norway with wherethewildis.co.uk

The city of Tromso, pictured, will be your base on an eco-conscious trip in Norway with wherethewildis.co.uk

Two nights of the Norway tour are spent in a cabin by the sea at Vengsoy Rorbuer (pictured above) 

The wherethewildis.co.uk trip includes two nights in a cabin at Vengsoy Rorbuer, which as this image of the spot shows is a great place for viewing auroras

The wherethewildis.co.uk trip includes two nights in a cabin at Vengsoy Rorbuer, which as this image of the spot shows is a great place for viewing auroras

If you are looking for a trip that is as eco-conscious as possible, this short break to Norway could be just the ticket. Based in Tromso, you will be taken in Tesla electric cars to go snowshoeing by the fjords by day and in search of the Northern Lights at night. You can also enjoy whale-watching on a hybrid electric catamaran.

After three nights in Tromso, two nights are spent in a cabin by the sea at Vengsoy Rorbuer, the ideal place to search for some inner calm as well as aurora activity.

Book: Three nights’ B&B plus two nights’ self-catering, with transfers and excursions, costs from £1,240pp (wherethewildis.co.uk). Flights are not included.

Snowmobile tours and a stroll through a glacier

Inside one of 25 stone and wood guesthouses at the Torfhus Retreat in Iceland. Each retreat boasts a complimentary mini bar for a toast should the Northern Lights show up

Inside one of 25 stone and wood guesthouses at the Torfhus Retreat in Iceland. Each retreat boasts a complimentary mini bar for a toast should the Northern Lights show up

Step on to the surface of the mighty Myrdalsjokull glacier and venture under another glacier to explore its impressive ice caves.

Then hop on your snowmobile back to the Torfhus Retreat in an untouched part of the country and sink into the open-air geothermically heated pool as you get ready for the show in the night sky.

The retreat has 25 stone and wood homes and suites, with turf roofs and complimentary mini bars for a toast should the Northern Lights show up. Two snowmobile excursions and a guided jeep experience are included.

Book: Four nights’ B&B with flights costs from £4,520pp (wixsquared.com).

Snuggle under reindeer skin during an Icehotel stay

The Icehotel has been created in the Jukkasjarvi village in the north of Sweden every year since 1989. Pictured above is 2020's version

The Icehotel has been created in the Jukkasjarvi village in the north of Sweden every year since 1989. Pictured above is 2020’s version

Rooms themed on a Dickensian Street, The Great Gatsby and the somewhat more confusing ‘To Bed With Chickens’ will be part of this year’s Icehotel, which has been created in the Jukkasjarvi village in the north of Sweden every year since 1989.

Each room is a chilly minus 5C, but beds are equipped with reindeer skins and thermal sleeping bags.

Book: Three nights’ B&B with one night in an ice room and two nights in ‘warm accommodation’, plus a husky-dog sled tour, an encounter with reindeer, a sauna ritual and a Northern Lights snowmobile tour with dinner, and flights, costs from £1,874pp (sunvil.co.uk). 

Track down Santa on the ultimate festive adventure

Try husky-mushing (pictured) on a trip to the Finnish village of Pyha with Canterbury Travel

Try husky-mushing (pictured) on a trip to the Finnish village of Pyha with Canterbury Travel

Among the accommodation options are cosy log cabins (pictured above) sleeping up to six people

Among the accommodation options are cosy log cabins (pictured above) sleeping up to six people

Whisk the kids or grandkids off on a Christmas adventure in search of Santa 

Whisk the kids or grandkids off on a Christmas adventure in search of Santa.

Don’t be tempted to take a day trip, which involves a hideously early start, and instead make it a mini-break to Finland’s Pyha.

Try your hand at husky-mushing, go on a snowmobile expedition through the pine forests and snuggle up in the back of a reindeer sleigh. The best bit, though, is going to Santa’s house for a chat with the big man himself, before a celebration dinner.

Among the accommodation options are cosy log cabins sleeping up to six people.

Book: Three nights’ full-board in December with flights costs from £1,580 per adult in the cabins, and £1,480 per child (canterburytravel.com).

See the stars at the top of the world – from your bed

Lie in bed and gaze through the glass roof of your chalet at the Aurora Village in Ivalo, in Finnish Lapland, in the hope of seeing the celestial ballet of the Northern Lights.

The stay is part of a ten-day guided group trip which then crosses into Norway, where you can toast reaching one of Europe’s most northerly points at North Cape with champagne and caviar. There’s the chance, too, to meet husky-dog racer Trine and her puppies in Alta, and to visit an ice bar.

Book: Ten days costs from £3,450pp on a B&B basis with six dinners (three with wine) and included experiences, flights and coach transfers, plus UK door-to-door airport transfers (insightvacations.com).

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The doors of Sweden’s Icehotel for 2022 are open – and these pictures show that it’s as mesmerising as ever.

Each year since 1989, the Icehotel has been built and rebuilt using just snow and ice in the village of Jukkasjarvi, 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle next to the shores of the Torne River.

For this year’s winter Icehotel – No.32 – 27 artists from all over the world spent six weeks creating 12 suites, as well as three new suites in Icehotel 365, the year-round version.

'Dickensian Street' by British father and daughter duo Jonathan and Marnie Green

‘Dickensian Street’ by British father and daughter duo Jonathan and Marnie Green

The 'No Pressure' suite, pictured, depicts Earth in a press, with the bed placed in a gigantic vice. The room was created by two Swedes, sculptor Carl Wellander and neuroscience student Klara Wellander

The ‘No Pressure’ suite, pictured, depicts Earth in a press, with the bed placed in a gigantic vice. The room was created by two Swedes, sculptor Carl Wellander and neuroscience student Klara Wellander

Pictured here is the 'To Bed with the Chickens' suite, created by Edith Van de Wetering and Wilfred Stijger from the Netherlands

Pictured here is the ‘To Bed with the Chickens’ suite, created by Edith Van de Wetering and Wilfred Stijger from the Netherlands

Ice chickens roosting in the 'To Bed with the Chickens' suite. The phrase 'go to bed with the chickens' means going to bed early

Ice chickens roosting in the ‘To Bed with the Chickens’ suite. The phrase ‘go to bed with the chickens’ means going to bed early

And there is a new design for the Icehotel ceremony hall for ‘intimate celebrations’, built by artists Marjolein Vonk and Maurizio Perron.

Helped by the hotel’s construction team and Creative Director Luca Roncoroni, the artists whittled their creations using 600 tons of ice and 10 Olympic swimming pools of ‘snice’ – a mixture of snow and ice.

The temperature inside the building is around -5C, which keeps the sub-zero masterpieces in tip-top condition.

This suite is called 'UV' and was created by designers Nicolas Triboulot and Fernand Manzi, both from France

This suite is called ‘UV’ and was created by designers Nicolas Triboulot and Fernand Manzi, both from France

The 'Blue Tundra' suite, where reindeer 'gather for their migration to the coast'. This room was created by sculptor Elisabeth Kristensen from Norway

The ‘Blue Tundra’ suite, where reindeer ‘gather for their migration to the coast’. This room was created by sculptor Elisabeth Kristensen from Norway

This mesmerising suite, called Ginnungagap, was created by Onomiau, a French architecture and design practice

This mesmerising suite, called Ginnungagap, was created by Onomiau, a French architecture and design practice

The amazing 'Room Service' suite, created by Swedes Tjasa Gusfors and Ulrika Tallving

The amazing ‘Room Service’ suite, created by Swedes Tjasa Gusfors and Ulrika Tallving

One highlight of the new hotel is a suite designed by British father and daughter duo Jonathan and Marnie Green called ‘Dickensian Street’. Here guests are ‘taken on a trip back in time to travel in a bygone era down the cobbles of a London street set in Dickensian times with shops, houses and even a pub intricately carved out of ice’.

Guests can also marvel at the hexagonal Art Deco interior of the ‘Great Gatsby’ suite, a band of monkeys and a prehistoric dinosaur crash the party in the ‘Room Service’ suite and reindeer from the frosty blue tundra gather for their migration to the coast in the ‘Blue Tundra’ suite.

There’s also a suite filled with chickens in the ‘To Bed with the Chickens’ suite, created by Edith Van de Wetering and Wilfred Stijger from the Netherlands, with the phrase ‘go to bed with the chickens’ meaning going to bed early.

Sculptor Robert Harding and artist Timsam Harding created this room - 'Different Natures'

Sculptor Robert Harding and artist Timsam Harding created this room – ‘Different Natures’

The other-worldly 'Ceremony Hall', created by Dutch stylist and art director Marjolein Vonk and Italian sculptor Maurizio Perron

The other-worldly ‘Ceremony Hall’, created by Dutch stylist and art director Marjolein Vonk and Italian sculptor Maurizio Perron

Swedish artists and sculptors AnnaSofia Maag, Emilia Elisson, My Flink and Oscar Insulander banded together to create this room, called 'Sacred Giant'

Swedish artists and sculptors AnnaSofia Maag, Emilia Elisson, My Flink and Oscar Insulander banded together to create this room, called ‘Sacred Giant’

This room is called Inom and was created by artist and sculptor 'Henkia', who's based in Stockholm and Berlin

This room is called Inom and was created by artist and sculptor ‘Henkia’, who’s based in Stockholm and Berlin

A BLIZZARD OF FACTS ABOUT THE 2022 ICEHOTEL 

  • 27 artists created the new art suites in Icehotel 32, as well as in Icehotel 365.
  • 600 tons of ice were used to build the Icehotel 32.
  • 10 Olympic swimming pools (25,000 cubic metres) of snice, a mix of snow and ice, were used to create Icehotel 32.
  • 200 handmade ice crystals were used to create the crystal chandeliers in Icehotel 32.
  • Icehotel 32 has a temperature of -5C inside the building.
  • It takes six weeks to build Icehotel 32, from start to finish.
  • Icehotel was named the world’s leading ice hotel and winner of the World Travel Awards 2020.

Extinct animals feature in the ‘No Pressure’ suite, meanwhile. This room depicts Earth in a press, with the bed placed in a gigantic vice.

Activities on offer at the hotel include snowmobiling and dogsledding under the Northern Lights, sipping cocktails out of frozen glasses and guests can challenge themselves to a spot of ice sculpting.

The winter hotel will be open until April 2022. To book a trip to the Icehotel for this year or to visit during the summer or next winter, contact Discover the World on 01737 214 291 or at www.discover-the-world.com/holidays/icehotel-break.

Each year since 1989, the Icehotel has been built and rebuilt using just snow and ice in the village of Jukkasjarvi, 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle next to the shores of the Torne River. Pictured here is a new deluxe suite located in Icehotel 365, the permanent hotel, called A Midsummer Night’s Dream, from a design team that included Prince Carl Philip Bernadotte and his colleague Oscar Kylberg

Each year since 1989, the Icehotel has been built and rebuilt using just snow and ice in the village of Jukkasjarvi, 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle next to the shores of the Torne River. Pictured here is a new deluxe suite located in Icehotel 365, the permanent hotel, called A Midsummer Night’s Dream, from a design team that included Prince Carl Philip Bernadotte and his colleague Oscar Kylberg

The Art Deco 'Great Gatsby' suite, created by artist and designer Tomasz Czajkowski and architect Tomasz Jastrzebski, both from Poland

 The Art Deco ‘Great Gatsby’ suite, created by artist and designer Tomasz Czajkowski and architect Tomasz Jastrzebski, both from Poland

This ethereal suite is called 'Molecules' and was created by interior and textile designer Anja Kilian and product designer Wolfgang Luchow, both from Germany

This ethereal suite is called ‘Molecules’ and was created by interior and textile designer Anja Kilian and product designer Wolfgang Luchow, both from Germany



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Countries with populations that have higher levels of trust in each other saw Covid cases and deaths fall faster, a study has found.

Exeter University experts found nations where at least 40 per cent of the population agreed with the statement ‘most people can be trusted’ were more successful in bringing down Covid rates from peak levels in the first year of the pandemic.

The UK barely meets the 40 per cent threshold, while up to 74 per cent of people in Scandinavia trust each other, compared to 63.5 per cent in China and 37 per cent in the US. 

The team believes this is because restrictions in place to suppress the spread of the virus – such as face masks and social distancing – ‘depend on mutual trust to be effective’. 

Professor Tim Lenton, one of the researchers, said: ‘Our results add to evidence that trust within society benefits resilience to epidemics. 

‘Building trust within communities should be a long-term project for all nations because this will help them cope with future pandemics and other challenges such as extreme events caused by climate change.’ 

Exeter University academics found nations where at least 40 per cent of the population agreed with the statement 'most people can be trusted' were more successful in bringing down Covid rates from peak levels in the first year of the pandemic.  China, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden have some of the most trusting populations. The UK met the 40 per cent threshold, while the US fell below it. The graph shows Norway and Denmark saw cases fall back to low levels faster than the UK and US

Exeter University academics found nations where at least 40 per cent of the population agreed with the statement ‘most people can be trusted’ were more successful in bringing down Covid rates from peak levels in the first year of the pandemic.  China, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden have some of the most trusting populations. The UK met the 40 per cent threshold, while the US fell below it. The graph shows Norway and Denmark saw cases fall back to low levels faster than the UK and US

The researchers said the most trusting societies saw cases fall up to 40 times faster and deaths drop 25 times quicker than the least trusting. The data shows Covid deaths returned to low levels faster in Denmark, Norway and China compared to the UK and the US, where the populations were less trusting

 The researchers said the most trusting societies saw cases fall up to 40 times faster and deaths drop 25 times quicker than the least trusting. The data shows Covid deaths returned to low levels faster in Denmark, Norway and China compared to the UK and the US, where the populations were less trusting

The graph shows a correlation between the speed at which Covid cases (left) and deaths (right) fell and how trusting populations are. Countries where at least 40 per cent of the population agreed with the statement that 'most people can be trusted' saw infections and deaths fall faster from the peak in the first year of the pandemic than places where societies are less trusting

The graph shows a correlation between the speed at which Covid cases (left) and deaths (right) fell and how trusting populations are. Countries where at least 40 per cent of the population agreed with the statement that ‘most people can be trusted’ saw infections and deaths fall faster from the peak in the first year of the pandemic than places where societies are less trusting 

The Exeter researchers' map shows countries in relation to how quickly their Covid cases (top) and deaths (bottom) fell, with blue nations seeing the fastest decline and red countries seeing Covid measurements drop slowest

The Exeter researchers’ map shows countries in relation to how quickly their Covid cases (top) and deaths (bottom) fell, with blue nations seeing the fastest decline and red countries seeing Covid measurements drop slowest

The researchers used Oxford University platform Our World in Data to measure the daily change in coronavirus infections and deaths from peak levels between the start of the pandemic and December 1 – before vaccines were widely rolled out. 

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, found countries where at least 40 per cent of people said the majority of others could be trusted ‘achieved a near complete reduction’ of new cases and deaths. 

What societies are the most trusting? 

Denmark: 73.9%

Norway: 72.1% 

Finland: 68.4% 

China: 63.5%

Sweden: 62.8% 

New Zealand: 56.6% 

Austria: 49.8%

Australia: 48.5% 

Canada: 46.7%

Spain: 41%

UK: 40.2% 

Germany: 39.5% 

US: 37% 

France: 26.3%  

Italy: 26.6% 

Greece: 8.4% 

The most trusting societies saw cases fall up to 40 times faster and deaths drop 25 times quicker than the least trusting, the team said.

Mauritius saw cases fall at the fastest rate from the first peak in 2020.

However, the experts noted some nations which did not meet the 40 per cent threshold also saw a sharp decline from peak cases and deaths, ‘indicating that trust in each other is only one of several factors at play’. 

The team said their findings show strict Covid curbs do not have the same effect when applied in different countries.

Most nations implemented similar rules at the start of the pandemic but had ‘hugely varying success in bringing down case numbers and deaths’, they said.

‘This is partly because more stringent governments tend to be associated with less trusting societies,’ according to the researchers.

The experts wrote: ‘These results add to evidence that trust can improve resilience to epidemics and other unexpected disruptions, of which Covid is unlikely to be the last.’

It comes as Chinese city Anyang, in the Henan province, entered a fresh lockdown today, placing a stay-at-home order on five million people as the country battles a spike in cases, in part fuelled by Omicron.

Last week, one million people in Yuzhou — also a city in Henan — were told to stay at home, while Xi’an, home to 13million people, is in its third week of lockdown. 

The new curbs in Anyang mean all non-essential businesses have been forced to close and a mass-testing drive has been launched to stop the variant spreading.

And all travel out of the city has been restricted in an attempt to stop the variant spreading into other parts of the country. 

China reported 110 new local virus cases Tuesday, a tiny figure compared to the more than 140,000 recorded in the UK and more than 1.5million registered in the US yesterday. 

But they are a cause of alarm for Chinese authorities as they prepare to host the Winter Games in Beijing, with the event already expected to have tight coronavirus safety protocols.

Tianjin, which is adjacent to Winter Olympics venues in Beijing and Hebei province, confirmed another 10 new locally transmitted cases after citywide mass testing.

The UK initially avoided imposing Covid restrictions because of fears people would get ‘fed up’ of abiding by rules adopted in other countries.

But Britons have since spent several months over the last two years following stay-at-home orders, avoiding seeing friends and family and working from home.  

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