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The renowned audio brand positioned the newly-launched Bose 700s above the QC 35 IIs, thanks to the sleek modern design, the ability to pair to two devices at once, boosted noise-cancellation, and support for Amazon Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant (the QC 35 IIs only have support for the latter, which is great for Android users… but not anyone else).

Bose 700s boast 11 levels of active noise cancelling – cutting out the rumble of the train carriage on your commute, the hum of the photocopier beside your desk, or the groan of a jet engine on your next flight.

Noise-cancellation lets you enjoy podcasts, music, radio, or watch a boxset or movie on your phone without the need to crank up the volume to damaging levels. The bundled adapter means you’ll be able to use the Bose 700s with an in-flight entertainment system on your next long haul journey.



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Motorists in London from today face being stung with higher fines if they break rules when driving on the city’s busiest, no-stopping, ‘Red Routes’.

Transport for London has increased the maximum fine on the capital’s busiest roads from £130 to £160 – a 23 per cent hike – despite nearly two-thirds (65 per cent) of drivers opposing the hiked charges in a consultation held last year.

Red routes account for around 390 miles of the capital’s roads. While that’s around just five per cent of the road network, these are the busiest routes, with between 30 and 40 per cent of daily traffic in London using them.

As of today (Monday 17 January), motorists will be fined an extra £30 if they are found committing a number of contraventions, such as blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes. 

Higher fines in London come into force TODAY: Drivers caught breaking rules on the capital's 390-mile network of red routes will be hit with a fine of £160 - up from £130

Higher fines in London come into force TODAY: Drivers caught breaking rules on the capital’s 390-mile network of red routes will be hit with a fine of £160 – up from £130

Red routes are marked by red lines on the sides of the road and are managed and controlled by London Streets – an arm of Transport for London.

They are designed to help reduce congestion on the capital’s most-used roads, with ‘no-stopping’ rules applying to ensure ‘crucial’ deliveries and journeys can be made safely to keep the city moving.

If motorists don’t follow the rules on red routes, TfL will issue a driver with a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) with the notice of a £160 fine. 

How you can land a £160 fine on a red route

Transport for London issues penalty charge notices for several motoring breaches, including:

– Parking illegally in loading bays

– Blocking yellow box junctions

– Making a turn where this movement is banned, which creates risk for people walking and cycling

– Driving or parking in a bus lane

– Stopping on the red route

Source: TfL

 

If paid within 14 days, the fine is halved to £80. However, if it the driver fails to make payment within 28 days, the penalty increased by 50 per cent to £240.  

TfL bosses say the near-quarter increase in fine values is in response to a rise in motorists ignoring the rules on red routes.

They claim there has been a 26 per cent increase in the number of PCNs issued for parking, loading, bus lane and moving traffic offences on red routes between 2016 and 2019 and by increasing the fine it will act as a greater deterrent.

Defending the hike, TfL added last week that the increase to £160 is ‘in line with inflation since the last increase’ and brings the fine amount in-line with penalties for non-payment of the the capital’s Congestion Charge and the recently extended Ultra-Low Emission Zone. 

Siwan Hayward, TfL’s director of compliance, policing, operations and security, justified the elevated fine amounts by stating that non-compliance with red route rules ‘impacts London’s air quality, creates safety risks, disrupts traffic, and creates congestion for everyone’. 

The rise comes just weeks after TfL confirmed a 30 per cent increase in the Congestion Charge to £15 per day will be permanent.

Motorists who are caught blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes on the capital's red routes now receive a penalty charge notice (PCN)  of £160. Early payment (within 14 days) reduces the fine to £80

Motorists who are caught blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes on the capital’s red routes now receive a penalty charge notice (PCN)  of £160. Early payment (within 14 days) reduces the fine to £80

Red routes are managed by TfL and make up around 5% of London's road network. However, they are also some of the busiest in the city, carrying between 30-40% of traffic in the capital

Red routes are managed by TfL and make up around 5% of London’s road network. However, they are also some of the busiest in the city, carrying between 30-40% of traffic in the capital 

‘Increasing the level of the penalty charge is about improving compliance, not penalising drivers,’ Transport for London said in a statement. 

‘It should deter motorists from contravening essential rules and safety restrictions. 

How can you tell tell if you’re driving along a red route?

 

Of London’s 9,197 miles of road network, around 390 miles (approx 5%) are ‘Red Routes’.

They are managed and controlled by London Streets, which is a dedicated arm of Transport for London.

Red routes are recognisable for their painted red ‘no-stopping’ lines. They are also accompanied by signage.

If drivers see red lines on the road, it means there are restrictions on stopping, parking and loading. 

Double red lines – as seen pictured above – apply at all times and single red lines usually apply during the working day.

They are designed to keep traffic flowing and prohibit drivers from stopping except for in specified areas.

 

‘PCNs are an important way of encouraging road users to follow the rules of the road and are only issued to the small number of drivers who contravene these rules.’

It added: ‘Any revenue raised through these penalty notices is invested back into London’s transport network, which includes investing in its road network to improve safety for all road users.’  

RAC head of roads policy Nicholas Lyes described the increase as ‘eye-watering’.

He said it will make PCNs ‘not far off the fine for a serious motoring offence such as illegally using a handheld mobile phone’.

Fines for illegal phone use while driving are £200. 

President of the AA, Edmund King, was also vocal about the fine increase.

He said there was ‘no justification’ for increasing fines, adding that nearly two thirds (65 per cent) of respondents to a public consultation held between August and September believed a financial penalty of £160 was too high.

‘The AA fully accepts the need for fair and effective road traffic enforcement to deter selfish and illegal driving that impedes other road users, reduces the effectiveness of the road network, disrupts business and can lead to increased emissions,’ Mr King said. 

‘However, enforcement needs to be fair, proportionate and allow discretion while creating a deterrent. The AA believes that £130 fines are sufficient to provide deterrence.’

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OnePlus has slashed the cost of OnePlus Nord in half for an extremely limited time. Stock is dwindling, but if you’re quick – you’ll be able to secure this incredible deal on the OnePlus website. Even at launch, OnePlus Nord was a pretty impressive deal. At £469, it landed with 12GB of RAM, 256GB of built-in storage, and the Qualcomm-designed Snapdragon 765G 5G, keeping Android feeling buttery smooth. OnePlus has a phenomenal track record when it comes to rolling out new features to its older handsets with consistent operating system updates, so you can expect to see some new tricks coming to OnePlus Nord in the coming weeks and months. At £234.50, OnePlus Nord is a mind-bogglingly good deal. The handset will be available for as long as stock remains, so don’t wait around thinking about whether this is the right deal for you too long… as it promises to sell-out very soon.

OnePlus launched the half price promotion last week, with the first batch of OnePlus Nord handsets selling out within hours. And now, the second – and final – batch of OnePlus Nord are available to buy. OnePlus will end the incredible deal within 24-hours or until stock runs out.

Given that, at the time of writing, there’s only 8 units left in the Gray Ash colour and 164 for the Blue Marble option …it seems like demand is going to prevent this deal from lasting until the end of its 24-hour deadline. Not only can OnePlus fans grab the smartphone at half the usual cost, but OnePlus will also throw in a free case, in Sandstone or Blue, for free. These cases usually cost £17.99 when bought separately from the OnePlus Store.

It also means you won’t need to worry about damaging your brand-new OnePlus Nord when you take it out-and-about as, let’s be honest, you’re unlikely to be able to pick up another one at the same price. If you haven’t heard of the brand or model before, you can check out our comprehensive OnePlus Nord review. At the time, we claimed that “this phone simply shouldn’t be possible at this price” and that was written at a time when OnePlus Nord cost over £400 – highlighting what an unbelievable deal this is.

OnePlus accepts PayPal, VISA, Mastercard, American Express, and also offers payment plans via Klarna.



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New rules for travellers entering England 

  • From Friday, January 7, fully vaccinated travellers and those aged under-18 no longer need to take a test two days before travelling to England from countries outside the UK and the Common Travel Area. 
  • As of today, travellers will only have to take a lateral flow test instead of the more expensive PCR test on day two. This test must be purchased from a private test provider – free NHS tests are not allowed
  • Unvaccinated passengers will need to continue to take a pre-departure test, PCR tests on day two and day eight, and self-isolate for 10 days

Rules for testing have been eased for travellers arriving in England today, the Government has announced.

Since Friday, fully vaccinated travellers no longer have to take a pre-departure test before they travel to England.

And as of today, they may take a lateral flow test purchased from a private test provider within two days of arrival rather than the more expensive PCR. 

Until now, travellers have been required to take the PCR test before day two and self-isolate while waiting for the result. 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the pre-departure test discouraged many from travelling ‘for fear of being trapped overseas and incurring significant extra expense’, the BBC reports.

The announcement comes after airlines claimed traveller testing was making little impact, with data last week suggesting that one in 25 people in England had the virus.

On Friday, an airline boss said that demand for holidays was returning to pre-pandemic levels after the announcement of the eased restrictions. 

The measures will save families hundreds of pounds on not having to buy so many tests and make it much easier to book holidays – and has resulted in a surge in demand among winter sun-seekers and families looking to reunite with loved ones.

PCR tests on average cost around £80 per traveller, compared to £20-£30 for a rapid swab, saving families up to £200 on post-arrival tests alone. They could save another £100 in tests taken for entry into the UK.

Steve Heapy, chief executive of Jet2, told BBC Radio Four’s Today programme that demand for holidays had now reached similar levels to those seen before the start of the pandemic.

A busy terminal 5 arrivals hall at Heathrow Airport on Friday as passengers arriving back into the UK no longer need to take a PCR test

A busy terminal 5 arrivals hall at Heathrow Airport on Friday as passengers arriving back into the UK no longer need to take a PCR test

He said: ‘Demand is around pre-Covid levels. Prior to the announcement it was well below, but it has given people the confidence to look for a holiday, that they won’t be caught in resorts quarantining. People now want to start thinking about more cheerful things, ie going on holiday.

‘There’s always a risk that we could have new restrictions but I think the Omicron variant has shown to governments you need to bide your time and look at the science a bit before jumping into lockdown.

‘As Professor Whitty said we have to learn to live with this virus, we can’t just jump into further restrictions every time we have a new variant – we have to learn to live with it. Hopefully this is the beginning of the end we can get back to some form of normality.

‘Our plans for summer 2022 remain the same and we have a bigger programme than summer 2019. Some companies are saying it’s going to take two or three years to recover, we are back to above summer 2019 levels. 

‘I think it’s realistic [to be making such preparations], it’s optimistic obviously, but after two years of dealing with the virus, we’re in a place where we can live with it better. 

‘People are desperate to get away. It’s two or three years since some people have had a holiday, and I think it’s very good for health getting away in the sun, lying on a beach, getting some Vitamin D etc.’

Fully vaccinated travellers and those aged under 18 will no longer need to take a test two days before travelling to England

Fully vaccinated travellers and those aged under 18 will no longer need to take a test two days before travelling to England

Upon arrival, they will only have to take a lateral flow test instead of the more expensive PCR test on day two. This test must be purchased from a private test provider - free NHS tests are not allowed

Upon arrival, they will only have to take a lateral flow test instead of the more expensive PCR test on day two. This test must be purchased from a private test provider – free NHS tests are not allowed

Unvaccinated passengers will need to continue to take a pre-departure test, PCR tests on day two and day eight, and self-isolate for 10 days

Unvaccinated passengers will need to continue to take a pre-departure test, PCR tests on day two and day eight, and self-isolate for 10 days

Steve Heapy, chief executive of Jet2, told BBC Radio Four’s Today programme that demand for holidays had now reached similar levels to those seen before the start of the pandemic

Meanwhile, a spokeswoman for tour operator Tui said Mr Johnson’s announcement ‘has given Brits the reassurance that travel will once again be easier and more affordable’. 

She went on: ‘We’ve already seen an immediate and strong uptick in bookings and we now expect summer 2022 bookings to be normalised. 

‘January is traditionally the busiest month for holiday bookings and demand is yet to reach pre-Covid levels, so we need to see sustained confidence in travel so the industry can fully recover.’ 

The firm’s biggest booking spikes have been for Mexico and the Canaries. Derek Jones, chief executive of luxury travel company Kuoni, said the easing of testing rules ‘should be the beginning of the end of Covid as a blocker to international travel’. 

Mr Jones continued: ‘I predict travel will be 90% back to 2019 levels before the end of spring. 

‘We’re already seeing increased call volumes and inquiries about trips for the year ahead as confidence builds.’ 

Britons can fly to 16 countries for under £10 this month – including Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania and Spain.

The cheapest single flights found by MailOnline for this month were £4 from London Stansted to Zagreb with Ryanair, and £5 for both London Luton to Rome with WizzAir and Stansted to Eindhoven with Ryanair. UK tourists can also go from Stansted with Ryanair to Oslo or Krakow for £6, Vienna for £7 and Sofia or Dublin for £8.  

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in a statement in the House of Commons earlier this week that the Omicron variant of Covid-19 is now so prevalent in the UK that the measure is having limited impact on the spread of the disease.

Flight booking website Skyscanner now expects 2022 will now be a ‘bumper bargain year for travel’ with prices currently up to 71 per cent cheaper than pre-pandemic for some destinations, compared to the 2019 average.

The company said that in the first hours following Mr Johnson’s announcement, Skyscanner saw an 81 per cent increase in visits to the site, week on week. 

It said bookings by UK travellers were already up 25 per cent in the week to this Monday compared to the previous week – and the top five summer destinations booked by Britons are Orlando, Malaga, Faro, Alicante and Palma.  

Britons can fly to 16 countries for under £10 this month - including Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania and Spain

Britons can fly to 16 countries for under £10 this month – including Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania and Spain

Passengers sit in the international arrivals hall at London Heathrow Airport today after the new testing rules were announced

Passengers sit in the international arrivals hall at London Heathrow Airport today after the new testing rules were announced

Passengers walk around the departures area of London Heathrow Airport today after the rules were changed

Passengers walk around the departures area of London Heathrow Airport today after the rules were changed

Flight crew walk through Heathrow Airport today as it was revealed that pre-travel testing requirements will be dropped

Flight crew walk through Heathrow Airport today as it was revealed that pre-travel testing requirements will be dropped

Cheapest flights available for Britons this month

  • £4 to Croatia: London Stansted to Zagreb (Ryanair, January 22, 0830-1150, 2h20m)
  • £5 to Italy: London Luton to Rome (WizzAir, January 22, 1020-1350, 2h30m) 
  • £5 to Netherlands: London Stansted to Eindhoven (Ryanair, January 22, 0615-0830, 1h05m) 
  • £6 to Norway: London Stansted to Oslo (Ryanair, January 22, 1800-2100, 2h) 
  • £6 to Poland: London Stansted to Krakow (Ryanair, January 22, 0840-1155, 2h15m) 
  • £7 to Austria: London Stansted to Vienna (Ryanair, January 22, 0830-1135, 2h05m) 
  • £8 to Bulgaria: London Stansted to Sofia (Ryanair, January 25, 0635-1135, 3h) 
  • £8 to Ireland: London Stansted to Dublin (Ryanair, January 25, 0530-0745, 1h15m) 
  • £9 to Czech Republic: London Stansted to Prague (Ryanair, January 25, 1145-1435, 1h50m) 
  • £9 to Denmark: London Stansted to Copenhagen (Ryanair, January 26, 0840-1125, 1h45m)
  • £9 to Germany: London Stansted to Berlin (Ryanair, January 22, 0730-1010, 1h40m) 
  • £9 to Greece: London Stansted to Athens (Ryanair, January 25, 1545-2115, 3h30m) 
  • £9 to Latvia: London Stansted to Riga (Ryanair, January 19, 0620-1055, 2h35m)
  • £9 to Portugal: London Stansted to Lisbon (Ryanair, January 25, 0620-0910, 2h50m) 
  • £9 to Romania: London Luton to Bucharest (WizzAir, January 22, 1650-2205, 3h15m) 
  • £9 to Spain: London Stansted to Zaragoza (Ryanair, January 22, 1245-1555, 2h10m) 
  • £9 to Sweden: London Stansted to Gothenburg (Ryanair, January 25, 1845-2140, 1h55m) 

Checked by MailOnline on Skyscanner at about 10am today. Flight arrival and departures times are local.

Stephanie Boyle, Skyscanner’s global travel industry expert, told MailOnline: ‘This news will go a long way towards boosting confidence for travellers who are hoping to visit loved ones overseas or book a holiday in 2022. 

‘We expect to see a surge in demand from UK holidaymakers following the scrapping of pre-departure testing and self-isolation requirements, especially given the timing which aligns with a traditionally busy time for travel. 

‘Winter-weary workers returning this week after the festive period tend to want something to look forward to and will be keen to book breaks in the short term as well as planning bigger trips for the summer.’ 

She added: ‘We have more information on what we can expect from a calendar year living with the virus now and many will be planning big trips for the summer when traditionally we have seen fewer restrictions. 

‘The travel industry has proved its agility and resistance through difficult times and will be hoping for these new simpler rules to remain in place without change to continue the safe and sustained return of travel.’

The current travel testing rules were introduced in November last year amid a global panic over the spread of Omicron – but with the variant now dominant in the UK, many questioned why they remained.

Mr Johnson told the Commons that from this weekend, costly post-arrival PCR tests would be replaced with cheaper rapid swabs for the fully vaccinated.

Travellers must buy the post-arrival lateral flow tests from private providers before returning to England. They cannot use free NHS ones.

Tests which previously needed to be taken within 72 hours of travelling to England have also been axed. 

This change came into force at 4am today, whereas the replacement of PCRs with lateral flows post-arrival will come into effect at 4am on Sunday.

The new rules will apply only to those who have been fully vaccinated – which means double, rather than triple-jabbed.

Children aged five to 17 will be treated as fully vaccinated even if they are not, meaning they must also take day two post-arrival lateral flow tests.  Under-fives are exempt. 

The changes apply only to England, with Scotland and Northern Ireland yet to declare if they will follow suit. In Wales, health minister Eluned Morgan said they would be ‘reluctantly’ following suit.

Mr Johnson said: ‘When the Omicron variant was first identified, we rightly introduced travel restrictions to slow its arrival in our country.

‘But now Omicron is prevalent, these measures are having limited impact on the growth in cases, while continuing to incur significant costs to our travel industry.’

The changes come just in time for the travel industry, with January traditionally the busiest period for summer holiday bookings.

A British Airway aircraft comes in to land at London Heathrow Airport yesterday evening as the rule changes were announced

A British Airway aircraft comes in to land at London Heathrow Airport yesterday evening as the rule changes were announced

An aircraft comes in to land at Heathrow Airport last night as Boris Johnson announced a relaxing of travel testing rules

An aircraft comes in to land at Heathrow Airport last night as Boris Johnson announced a relaxing of travel testing rules

Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to the House of Commons yesterday where he announced changes to the travel rules

Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to the House of Commons yesterday where he announced changes to the travel rules

What will the new travel rules be for UK tourists? 

If you qualify as fully vaccinated for travel to England (meaning at least 14 days has passed since your second jab), and you will arrive in England from today (Friday, January 7), you do not need to:

  • Take a Covid test before you travel to England
  • Quarantine when you arrive in England

If you qualify as fully vaccinated and will arrive in England after 4am this Sunday (January 9), you can choose to take a lateral flow test instead of a PCR test after you arrive in England.

If you take a lateral flow test and test positive, you will need to self-isolate and take a free confirmatory PCR.

You must book the test before you travel to England. You can book lateral flows from today.

You must take the lateral flow test no later than the end of day two after arriving. For example, if you arrive on a Monday, this would be by the end of the Wednesday.

You cannot use a lateral flow until after 4am this Sunday. Before this time, you must use a PCR test after arrival. 

The fully vaccinated rules also apply to children aged 17 and under, people taking part in an approved vaccine trial, and people who are unable to have a vaccination due to medical reasons. Click here for more details

Willie Walsh, director-general of the International Air Transport Association trade body, said: ‘This is a long- overdue and welcome step back to the pre-Omicron regime. It’s clear that the extra measures had little or no impact on the spread on this new variant.’

Shai Weiss, chief executive of Virgin Atlantic, said: ‘Travellers can now book with confidence and look forward to reconnecting with loved ones and business colleagues. Meanwhile… vital testing capacity can be reallocated where it is needed the most – in hospitals, schools and crucial national infrastructure.’

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of the industry body Airlines UK, said it would be a ‘massive boost’ for the sector at a ‘critical’ time of the year.

‘People will now be able to book knowing that – for the fully vaccinated – all emergency testing restrictions have been removed,’ he said.

‘Today marks an important step towards learning to live alongside the virus, helping passengers and the travel sector look ahead to what will be an all-important spring and summer season.’

EasyJet chief executive Johan Lundgren also welcomed the move but said the Government needed to go further.

‘This will make travel much simpler and easier and means our customers can book and travel with confidence,’ he said.

‘However, the Government must now urgently take the final step towards restriction-free travel and remove the last remaining unnecessary test for vaccinated travellers so flying does not become the preserve of the rich.’ 

A spokesman for Heathrow Airport said: ‘Although this is welcome news, there is still a long way back for aviation which remains the lifeblood of the UK’s economy, supporting millions of jobs in all four nations.’

NHS lateral flow tests cannot be used for international travel, and the tests must be brought from a private provider. 

Those who have already brought PCR tests for travelling needs can still use these.

Julia Simpson, chief of the World Travel & Tourism Council, said: ‘The removal of pre-departure tests and replacing Day 2 PCRs with more affordable antigen testing will significantly boost the UK travel and tourism sector and help both it, and the whole UK economy recover much faster than expected.’ 

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