Ad
Ad
Ad
Tag

virtual

Browsing

[ad_1]

It has been 80 years since the first Japanese warship was sunk by the Australian navy during World War Two.

The I-124 had been on a secret mission laying mines off the coast of Darwin when it suffered irreparable damage from dozens of depth charges detonated by the HMAS Deloraine.

All 80 crew members died in the dramatic battle on January 20, 1942, just one month before the Japanese bombing of Darwin, and the wreck has lain on the sea bed ever since.

Exploring the site as a member of the public is impossible because of its protected status and shared heritage between Australia and Japan — until now that is.

That’s because a new virtual reality experience is offering unprecedented access to the World War Two submarine, enabling people to use YouTube to ‘dive’ down and get a closer look.

All they need is a VR headset, smartphone or tablet and I-124’s remains can be explored in extraordinary detail thanks to maritime archaeologists.

Scroll down for video

Exploring: A new virtual reality experience is offering unprecedented access to the Japanese World War Two submarine I-124 (pictured), which was sunk off the coast of Australia on January 20, 1942

Exploring: A new virtual reality experience is offering unprecedented access to the Japanese World War Two submarine I-124 (pictured), which was sunk off the coast of Australia on January 20, 1942

It allows people to use YouTube to 'dive' down and get a closer look at the wreck 40 miles off the coast of Darwin Harbour

It allows people to use YouTube to ‘dive’ down and get a closer look at the wreck 40 miles off the coast of Darwin Harbour

The wreck of the I-124 submarine was mapped (pictured) using state-of-the-art remote sensing equipment in October 2021

The wreck of the I-124 submarine was mapped (pictured) using state-of-the-art remote sensing equipment in October 2021

All 80 crew members onboard I-124 (pictured) died when the submarine was sunk on January 20, 1942, just one month before the Japanese bombing of Darwin, and the wreck has lain on the sea bed ever since

All 80 crew members onboard I-124 (pictured) died when the submarine was sunk on January 20, 1942, just one month before the Japanese bombing of Darwin, and the wreck has lain on the sea bed ever since

KEY FACTS ABOUT THE I-124 SUBMARINE 

Who built the I-124 submarine?

Kawasaki Corporation, Kobe, Japan 

When was she launched?

12 December 1927

How many crew members were there?

80

Top speed

14.9 knots surfaced; 6.5 submerged

Range

10,500 nautical miles

Length

279ft (85m)

Armament

  • 12 torpedoes
  • 1 naval gun
  • 42 naval mines

When did she first enter service?

Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937

What was her first action in WWII? 

Laying mines off Manilla Bay in the Philippines during her first patrol on 7 December 1941.  

When was she lost?

I-124 was sunk by the Australian navy’s HMAS Deloraine on January 20, 1942. She was on her third patrol during World War Two, laying mines off the coast of Darwin.

I-124 fired a torpedo at HMAS Deloraine, which in turn detonated dozens of depth charges in a sustained attack that irreparably damaged the submarine.

All 80 crew members on I-124 died.

In anticipation of the 80th anniversary, the Northern Territory Government Heritage Branch undertook a joint project with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) from the AIMS research vessel Solander to map the wreck using state-of-the-art remote sensing equipment in October 2021.

Dr John McCarthy, a maritime archaeologist at Flinders University, was then commissioned to create a virtual dive experience to show how this data is being used to understand and monitor this site, one of Australia’s most important wrecks.

‘Drawing on our data, and historic ship plans and photographs, we’ve created a virtual dive experience in which the video takes the viewer through the data gathering process, and then takes you down into the deep, to experience the wreck firsthand,’ said Dr McCarthy.

‘The archaeological survey shows that the wreck is in good condition, but with some signs of degradation of the outer hull that require further investigation.

‘Our aim was to create a realistic virtual experience with an accurate digital reconstruction of the submarine given the historical significance of the wreck in Australia and Japan.’

The wreck can be found 40 miles (65km) off the coast of Darwin Harbour.

It is considered a highly significant site of shared heritage between Australia and Japan, with former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attending a 2018 memorial service in Darwin honouring the Japanese soldiers who died.

Dr McCarthy said developments in virtual technology are making it possible to finally explore wrecks and submerged landscapes previously hidden to the wider public.

The I-124 was built by the Kawasaki Corporation in Kobe, Japan in 1926 and launched a year later on December 12, 1927.

She carried an armament that included 12 torpedoes, one naval gun and 42 naval mines.

Having first entered service during the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937, I-124 was later used for three patrols during World War Two.

The first saw the submarine lay mines off Manilla Bay in the Philippines in December 1941.

A second followed before I-124 was lost on her third patrol while laying mines off the coast of Darwin in northern Australia.

An unsuccessful attack on a US oil tanker in the region by a sister submarine prompted the Australian navy to send three corvettes to the scene between Darwin and Bathurst Island.

First there was HMAS Deloraine. I-124 fired a torpedo at the warship, which prompted the Australian navy to retaliate by detonating dozens of depth charges in a sustained attack.

This led to I-124 suffering irreparable damage and sinking to the sea bed in January 1942. 

All 80 crew members were killed in the battle. 

Dr John McCarthy, a maritime archaeologist at Flinders University, was commissioned to create a virtual dive experience to show how this data is being used to understand and monitor this site, one of Australia's most important wrecks

Dr John McCarthy, a maritime archaeologist at Flinders University, was commissioned to create a virtual dive experience to show how this data is being used to understand and monitor this site, one of Australia’s most important wrecks

'We've created a virtual dive experience in which the video takes the viewer through the data gathering process, and then takes you down into the deep, to experience the wreck firsthand,' said Dr McCarthy

‘We’ve created a virtual dive experience in which the video takes the viewer through the data gathering process, and then takes you down into the deep, to experience the wreck firsthand,’ said Dr McCarthy

Dr McCarthy said the archaeological survey shows that the wreck is in good condition, but with some signs of degradation of the outer hull that require further investigation

Dr McCarthy said the archaeological survey shows that the wreck is in good condition, but with some signs of degradation of the outer hull that require further investigation

The wreck off the coast of Darwin is considered a highly significant site of shared heritage between Australia and Japan

The wreck off the coast of Darwin is considered a highly significant site of shared heritage between Australia and Japan

Dr McCarthy said developments in virtual technology are making it possible to finally explore wrecks and submerged landscapes previously hidden to the wider public

Dr McCarthy said developments in virtual technology are making it possible to finally explore wrecks and submerged landscapes previously hidden to the wider public

the Northern Territory Government Heritage Branch undertook a joint project with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) from the AIMS research vessel Solander (pictured) to map the wreck

the Northern Territory Government Heritage Branch undertook a joint project with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) from the AIMS research vessel Solander (pictured) to map the wreck

I-124 suffered irreparable damage and sank to the sea bed during a battle 40 miles (65km) off the coast of Darwin in 1942

I-124 suffered irreparable damage and sank to the sea bed during a battle 40 miles (65km) off the coast of Darwin in 1942

During World War Two, Japan was Australia’s most ferocious enemy, dropping bombs on Darwin during 64 air raids between February 1942 and November 1943 that killed 252 Allied soldiers and civilians. 

On February 19, 1942, 188 Japanese planes attacked Darwin in two air raids, killing 235 people, wounding 400 and drawing Australia into the war.

It was the largest and most destructive single attack ever mounted by a foreign power on Australia and led to the worst death toll in the nation’s history.

Thirty aircraft were destroyed, 11 ships were sunk, and many civil and military facilities were also heavily damaged.

Nearly 2000 women and children had already been evacuated before the bombings started, but there was widespread panic and about half of Darwin’s remaining civilian population fled in the immediate aftermath.

The raids were planned and led by the commander responsible for the attack on Pearl Harbor ten weeks earlier, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto.

One Japanese plane crash-landed on Melville Island to Darwin’s north, and its pilot was captured by a local Aboriginal man. He was the first prisoner of war taken on Australian soil.

The assaults on northern Australia continued for the next two years, with more than 200 raids from Exmouth in the west to Townsville in Queensland.

The ‘virtual dive experience’ is available in both English and Japanese on YouTube here.

[ad_2]

[ad_1]

Our new Power Portfolio has arrived – we think it’s brilliant as do thousands of our existing users. We listened to our loyal audience and have made a raft of improvements.

Login/create a portfolio 

Below are some useful tips on how to get started and to keep going.

Power portfolio: Track your shares, funds and other investments

Power portfolio: Track your shares, funds and other investments

New users – how does it work?

New users – a very warm welcome. To get going, register with This is Money, then go to the portfolio login page – create a portfolio and give it a name then scroll down and fill in the fields in the Add transaction section. 

Start typing the name of the company or fund and choose from the results. 

Easy to use: Start typing the name of a company and choose from the list

Easy to use: Start typing the name of a company and choose from the list

You can add ‘Other investments’ such as foreign stocks, cash, property that will contribute to your total net worth but you’ll need to maintain the prices manually as they change over time. 

You can also access a wealth of information on the shares in your portfolio. 

Login/create a portfolio 

Shares: Use the tabs to see the vital information about your holdings

Shares: Use the tabs to see the vital information about your holdings 

Long-time users – do I need to start again?

If you’ve been using our portfolio for a while, some of you for more than 20 years, you will see that your shares and funds have been successfully imported into your portfolios. The old cash function has been mothballed because too few people used it. You can now add cash as an ‘Other investment’ along with property, cars, wine as you wish. 

What do the tabs mean?  

Portfolio – shows all your investments on one page, divided into investment type 

News – official announcements for your shares (general news will be added later) 

Allocation – see at a glance the sectors and industries you’re invested in

Statement – a ledger of when you added each entry to your portfolio 

Shares – this really allows you to drill down into fundamental data for your holdings 

Funds – is your fund clean or is your provider taking more charges than they need?

News: The official announcements for shares you're interested or invested in - all in one place

News: The official announcements for shares you’re interested or invested in – all in one place 

Funds: We show you whether your funds are clean - those without hidden charges

Funds: We show you whether your funds are clean – those without hidden charges

Sometimes asked questions 

These were once called frequently asked questions but the new Power Portfolio is so intuitive and reliable we don’t get asked many questions. But there’ll always be a few things that need ironing out. 

Missing funds?

For those people whose portfolios were migrated from the old version, you might find that some funds are no longer available or recognised. In this case, it will be listed under a heading ‘Other fund’ and display the old Citicode, which we no longer use.

These are likely to be investment trusts that are now only available under shares, funds that have changed name or ownership and the odd random glitch. If you know the fund name please look it up and add it again. You’ll be able to look up the date it was initially added.

Can’t delete entries?

One small bug reported to us by a few people that we’ve not been able to tackle yet is where you cannot delete some of the imported entries. Thankfully, a long-time fan worked out that if you enter it again you can then delete it. It works. We’re working on a longer term fix. 

Can’t log in?

If you find you cannot log in and are presented with an infuriation graphic going round in circles until you want to throw expensive IT equipment out the window. Don’t. Simply clear the cache on your device and make sure you’re using the correct new link.

https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/portfolio 

How often are prices updated?

Share prices are updated every few minutes throughout trading hours and fund prices once a day. Share data are from the London Stock Exchange and fund data from Morningstar via data specialist Webfg. The site was built by geniuses at Eck Technologies exclusively for This is Money. 

I’ve forgotten my password 

You can reset your password here. 

I’m stuck

Any problems please email editor@thisismoney.co.uk with details.

Did you know?

We rebuilt the entire market data section with everything you need to research your investments with comprehensive share performance tables to broker views, regulatory news, winners and losers, crypto, funds and more.

Finally, what have long-time users said about the new portfolio?

Ooh, glad you asked that.  Here’s some of our favourites.

The new portfolio is easy to use – Andrew

I find the “Power Portfolio” very useful – another Andrew

I’m a long time user and a big fan of your This is Money portfolio tool – Anthony

I find it invaluable – Barry

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

[ad_2]