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Vincent Zhou is finally out of quarantine after missing his event. 'A stroke of bad luck'

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  • Zhou tested positive for COVID-19 on Feb. 7 and spent a week in quarantine
  • He missed the individual men’s competition and it was too difficult to watch
  • One bright spot was hearing from friends and celebs, including Josh Groban

BEIJING – Vincent Zhou couldn’t watch as the men’s Olympic figure skating competition went on without him last week.

In isolation after a positive COVID-19 test in a hotel room somewhere in Beijing – he still isn’t exactly sure where he was, other than it was about a 30-minute drive from the Olympic Village – he kept up with the results, but that was all he could do.

“It was too emotionally difficult to actually watch it,” Zhou said on a Zoom call with reporters Wednesday after his week-long isolation ended. “Of course I wanted to see how my teammates did. I was extremely happy when both Nathan (Chen, the Olympic gold medalist) and Jason (Brown, who finished sixth) knocked it out of the park.

“It also was very difficult for me seeing the results because I knew I could have medaled. I’ve been training consistently where I could deliver well enough to pull a score like that and win the bronze medal, so definitely a very difficult day for me. But I worked through it mentally and I’m happy to be out … so I don’t really want to dwell on the negatives too much.”

Vincent Zhou skates in the men's long program during the Beijing Olympics.

Zhou, 21, helped Team USA to the silver medal (perhaps to turn into gold later pending the results of the Russian doping scandal) by skating the men’s team long program, but was robbed of the opportunity to compete in his main event when he shockingly found out he had tested positive for COVID Feb. 7.

He had been so cautious that even his teammates remarked about how they often saw him by himself.

“I think it’s true that I’ve been one of the most careful people,” he said. “Everything short of moving to Antarctica. I’ve taken lots of precautions. I tried to eat away from people. I chew with my mask on. I think it’s just really unfortunate. A stroke of bad luck. I honestly don’t know how I got it but I controlled the things that I could and sometimes bad things happen.”

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The day he won an Olympic silver medal was the day he found out he tested positive. “Definitely not easy at all. … I was not showing any symptoms certainly when I received the news of the positive test which was why it was very shocking for me. It was just kind of out of the blue.”

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I'm among the rideshare drivers living in fear, demanding safer work conditions

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Uber, Lyft safety: I’m mom of three. I need to know I’ll make it home.

Uber, Lyft made safety improvements, but many of those protect riders more than drivers. But drivers are also in danger.

Naomi Ogutu is a member of Justice for App Workers.

Naomi Ogutu

Opinion contributor

I’ve been a rideshare driver in New York City for six years, and I take pride in my job and helping my passengers get where they need to go safely. But my safety is not a guarantee. I’m a mom of three. I need to know that I’ll make it home to my kids at the end of each night. 

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'A bad déjà vu': Under the crush of Western sanctions, Russians fear a return to dark economic days

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Russians fear toll of sanctions triggered by Putin’s Ukraine invasion

Harsh sanctions from Western nations on Russia have reminded citizens of the country’s 1998 debt crisis.

By Anna Nemtsova

USA TODAY

  • McDonalds and other American businesses have closed in Russia amid its invasion into Ukraine.
  • One expert estimates more than 200,000 Russians have left the country since the start of the war.
  • To counter economic turmoil, Putin has demand “unfriendly” countries pay for natural gas exports in rubles.

The once bustling corner of Moscow’s central Tverskaya Street looked deserted on Wednesday, as Russia’s first-ever McDonald’s franchise – opened in 1990 in a move that symbolized the Soviet Union’s opening to the West – shut its doors.

A large mural depicting a giant, Soviet-era medal – the Order of Victory, the highest military decoration awarded in World War II — loomed over over the empty sidewalk.

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Saint Peter's embodies wackiness and uncertainty of this NCAA Tournament | Opinion

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